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Agreed with others about adjusting the front track shock as needed. I personally am a big fan of dual rate/spring set ups on the FTS, I know doo used to use them, not sure if they still do on the new stuff. I had a hygear set up on my last cat that worked great. If I need help with the xcr hygear definitely will get my business again.
HyGear is "Great" but sending now you'd be lucky to have them back by the end of the season. For me, getting HyGear shock work is an off-season thing.
 

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Not for sale! Just need suspension set up correctly.
Send your shocks out to have checked. Not uncommon to be way out of spec. If they’re OK, have them revalved while there. I wouldn’t go making all these changes without knowing that. Just my 2 cents… good luck
 

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I did put 1/4" more preload on the IFS. I love the front end. I don't have much preload on the FTS. I can move it a little bit side to side. I didn't want to make it too stiff and cause the fulcrum effect. I started both rear shocks at two on the high speed and 4 on the low speed. I just kept going up until I ran out of clicks. That was over 2.5 days of riding and 450 miles
If you turned the clickers full clockwise, you probably blew the shocks out. Never turn them full clockwise.
 

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I will call hygear in the morning. Thank you to all.

I think you are misunderstanding. I am not riding down trashed out rail beds. I am riding trails that every now and then have a washout in the bottom of a hill or dip. If you hit that at 50 it should handle it. The reason I am on this site is because I have a polaris xcr and am looking for insight on how to fix a problem that I am having with it. I thought that is what this site is for.
Those dips, and transitions pre/post hills are high g “slow” events, I would focus more on the low speed adjuster.
 

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As long as your shocks are ok. I would spring it stiffer to include ski springs. I think they are only 100 might want to go 120-130. A bit stiffer on fts. And maybe rears. This will allow you to bring the kickers down into a more mid range of adjustment. If you think the 22 is soft. Try a stock 20. Lol. I think they actually did a good job splitting the difference between the stiff bottom resistant ride I like and the plush ride others like. Imo and the way my sled is riding right now. I think a few hundred bucks in springs will set it right up. I honestly think most average buyers 200ish and under will be happy with it. Righ out of the box. It’s actually rideable. The 20 with stock calibrations was a shitbox until resprung and revalved . 1600-1800 later I got the 20 rocking. I’m 99 percent sure for about 400 I’ll have the 22 kicking ass in the bigger bumps with my heavy ass on it.
I would agree with the IFS springs going up to 110 or 220. The stiffer front when crushed down, will help the FTS from getting compressed as easy. I find the 110 gives a more usable range of adjustment.
 

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I took some pictures of my setup yesterday that could be helpful. I know you said your issue is with the rear but if the front is too high it will make the effects of the rear more dramatic. You can put a zip-tie on the base of the shock shaft to see how much travel you are effectively using. The A-Arms are practically flat and completely level with my weight on it.

I tried to show the new dual rate Elka springs next to the stock spring for reference. Also note the minimal preload on the center shock. Each full rotation of that limiter adjuster equals 1 hole on the strap. Adjuster essentially gives you 4 holes worth of adjustment. Hygear will likely suggest a similar setup. What would be even better is if they could coach you on how to set it up in shop. Guy I went to did that, everything made more sense and I didn't have to waste money on stuff I didn't need. Zoomed in the IFS so you can see the new rates. Best of Luck!

P.S: You could call or email Accelerated Technologies to find out their turn-around time on mail-in shocks. They were doing sled, sport bikes and pickup truck shocks while I was there. I think they mentioned 1-2 weeks. They're also a Hygear dealer.
 

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Who is the person or company to send them to? Also, I don't want them gone for a month. If I am understanding you guys correctly, I need to change the front shock spring as well as the back two springs? The dump truck analogy made me laugh because that is what it feels like. Going down a choppy trail I could hardly stay on the sled. Partly because the seat is so slippery. I seriously thought some dipshit played a joke on me and sprayed it with Armour all. My 7s display also will not find the satelights. I just keeps searching all day for them. So I have that going for me!
 

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Are you suggesting he sell his sled simply because he can't get the suspension setup? I don't think re-valving will do very much if the springs are not adequate no?
Obviously, you didn't pick up on the sarcasm ;)

What people are not paying attention to is A LOT of these shocks are not charged properly and they just start buying springs and this and that. Start with having the shocks looked at and yes, revalved for you if it's that important.

However, an occasional bottom is good on BIG hits and HOLES. Hard to tell what another person is experiencing and what they consider rough, big, too stiff, too soft, too much (what she said), not enough, blah blah
 

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Obviously, you didn't pick up on the sarcasm ;)

What people are not paying attention to is A LOT of these shocks are not charged properly and they just start buying springs and this and that. Start with having the shocks looked at and yes, revalved for you if it's that important.

However, an occasional bottom is good on BIG hits and HOLES. Hard to tell what another person is experiencing and what they consider rough, big, too stiff, too soft, too much (what she said), not enough, blah blah
I partially assumed that you were being sarcastic it's just I know people that would actually do something dumb like sell a sled simply because they can't set it up properly. They got lotsa money, I don't. I would also agree that anything mass produced is subject to varying tolerances especially now with supply low and demand high. I agree with your statements about trying to judge the problem and provide a solution.
I was totally in the clouds on suspension, coming off a Phazer with almost no adjustment, buying the XC was like trading in a hooptie for a Cadillac. I asked questions on here and got a whole whack of different answers in the end somebody suggested bringing my sled to the suspension expert I brought it to and they actually coached me in-person on the problem and how to fix it. Having said that, OP is not in Ontario but he could still call them and if they have the weight, riding style, skid length and make and model they could suggest options and provide instructions on how to set it up. I'm just a newb trying to cut a path through this technical jungle.
 

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Welcome to the XCR. So far my 20’ 21’ and the 22 I rode all bottomed fairly easy. I’m 175 riding weight and bottomed all of them more than they should. I’m beginning to think it’s the geometry of the skid. The more compression you throw at it or stiffer revalve, it rides like an empty dump truck everywhere else.

Doo seems to be able to get the best of both worlds, I’ll give them that.
The ski doo has a steeper rate increase at the rear shock than the Polaris. So more work can be done with the shock as far as bottoming without destroying overall ride compliance or resorting to too heavy springs.

The Polaris is great too though. I just believe that if you ride very hard or are heavier you have to do heavier springs AND REVALVE both rear shocks. Then you'll be back in business with ride quality and bottoming resistance that's up up to par with the skidoo.

I think the Polaris has an advantage that it is coupled front to rear as well as rear to front. The r motion is only coupled rear to front. This works fine at reasonable speeds and lower spring/damping. As you ride super hard or need stiffer damping and springs, the front to rear coupling becomes important again. Look at the R-motion race sled. It's coupled front to rear and rear to front. Without the front to rear coupling you start to need real heavy spring and damping at the front arm and it hurts.

Anything at the outer edge of its range is compromised. If you need to ride with the clickers maxed the universe is screaming out to you. Walker evans has real nice damping adjustment. But with the clickers maxed, the damping characteristics of the shock are far from ideal.

HD Springs in the rear+ Re-Valve to the point where you could be happy with no or very few clicks. 10-20% more spring on tne center shock with damping to match.
 

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I normally, not always, will start by adding preload to the FTS, and if I start to lose too much ski pressure I back off. I know that I basically can't run any more spring pressure at that point. And then I will adjust from there. If the sled is way out of wack initially that's a whole different story. It's the way I've always gotten my sleds in the ball park, then can fine tune from there. Moral is, I always start with the FTS.
 

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I don't think anyone can get a Poo to ride as good as a Doo period. My 17 Assault rode Ike a horse wagon, didn't matter what I did. I decided to try an Assault this year against my better judgment, we will see what the outcome is. Honestly it can't be worse then my last experience.

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The assault is a different animal. No coupling yet a very traditional 90s-2000's rear shock geometry. Spring on the shock. That's not all bad but it is given the geometry of this arrangement.

This rear suspension was: cost
reduction+weight target+make it good enough for it's intended purpose. It's not really a "trail" sled. It's made to get you to illegal off trail riding and to assault your spine on the trails back. Mission accomplished.
 
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