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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Snowtech listed their 2006 test sleds in the most recent issue, wet (ready to ride) but with no gas. I think that's the best way to do it, so you don't penalize them for putting on a big gas tank.

2006 F7 STD- 484 pounds
2006 Crossfire 700 Sno Pro- 499 pounds
2006 Switchback 600HO- 506 pounds
2006 MXZ800 Adr. (w/electric start and 1.25" Ripsaw)- 511 pounds
2006 Polaris Classic 700- 576 pounds
2006 Apex GT (136x1.25") 592 pounds
2006 Renegade 1000X (electric start) 604 pounds
2006 Attak (136x1.25") 608 pounds
 

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Snowtech listed their 2006 test sleds in the most recent issue, wet (ready to ride) but with no gas. I think that's the best way to do it, so you don't penalize them for putting on a big gas tank.

2006 F7 STD- 484 pounds
2006 Crossfire 700 Sno Pro- 499 pounds
2006 Switchback 600HO- 506 pounds
2006 MXZ800 Adr. (w/electric start and 1.25" Ripsaw)- 511 pounds
2006 Polaris Classic 700- 576 pounds
2006 Apex GT (136x1.25") 592 pounds
2006 Renegade 1000X (electric start) 604 pounds
2006 Attak (136x1.25") 608 pounds[/b]
How can you figure that this is the best way. Can you drive them like that? No! Fill em up and weigh them the way you ride them. Big tank, small tank, who cares!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
How can you figure that this is the best way. Can you drive them like that? No! Fill em up and weigh them the way you ride them. Big tank, small tank, who cares![/b]
Because if everyone weighs them full of gas, it encourages a manufacturer to put on a smaller tank, so that their sled looks lighter. It also lets you know how accurate the dry weight was from the manufacturer. For example, the Crossfire ("wet, no gas") was 14 pounds more than dry, so you know they were truthful. The Apex was WAY more than what Yamaha claimed (like 50 pounds), so you know that they were full of it.
 

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wet no gas is the way to go.

you can calc out wet with gas easy enough

gas wight/gallon is universal damb near .

im not sure what it is but its easy to figure out ,, water is about 8 lbs a gallon or so with a specific gravity of 1.0 eh?

wet wights + (# gallons ) X (pounds:gallon ) = your real world value your looking for * yes u can ride that*

that way u can use # gallons set to equal regardless of manufacturer size of tank.

imo set that number at 8 gallons , a rough number thats sloshing around my tank often when banging around.
 

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the best way is full tanks, no one is going to add 10 gallons to a 12 gallon tank. when you stop for gas you fill up. your weight is your weight with a full tank of gas.[/b]
I do. If I am going for a fifty mile ride I do not fill my tank to save the wieght.

Empty tanks makes the most sense to me.
 

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who would buy a sled with a smaller tank??????????[/b]
Revs have smaller tanks, lots of people buying them.


the best way is full tanks, no one is going to add 10 gallons to a 12 gallon tank. when you stop for gas you fill up. your weight is your weight with a full tank of gas.[/b]
Completly disagree. The true weight of a sled should be all fluids and no gas. This way it's fair for all, the sled is ready for the snow -gas. If you were into racing for example, your not going to run a full tank, just as much as you need. Yes, on the trail you would fill it up, but can you really tell the difference between a 1/2 tank and a full one when trail riding, no.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Damage,

Not Bashing here, but;
FYI:
No such sled as an Apex GT with a 136 x 1 1/4 " track built by Yamaha. :dunno:
Try again on your 50 lb overweight estimate.

Rice[/b]
I don't work for Snowtech, I am just reporting what they wrote. The reason why they noted that it had a 136x1.25 is obviously because they added it! These are their test sleds, and they DO modify some of them. That's why they added notes for sleds that were modified. Adding rail/tunnel extensions and a 136 should only add about 15 pounds, so yes, Yamaha's dry weight was around 50 pounds off, same as last year. Note that their Attak is also WAY off from their listed dry weight, not just the Apex. The Snowtech gang does a lot of their riding in the U.P. and they like to boondock, so an Apex with a stock 121 is pretty worthless for them. I saw an Apex, RX1, and a Nytro all get buried in the U.P. last year, all on level ground with set-up snow! They trench like a damn ditch witch with a 121 (just too much weight for off-trail riding).
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
the best way is full tanks, no one is going to add 10 gallons to a 12 gallon tank. when you stop for gas you fill up. your weight is your weight with a full tank of gas.[/b]
I think you guys are missing the point. If everyone weighed all the sleds wet, it would encourage the manufacturers to build them with smaller tanks, so they looked lighter. If brand A builds their 600 with a 10 gallon tank, and brand B builds theirs with a 12 gallon tank, it makes it looks like brand B is 12 pounds heavier, and they are in effect being penalized for giving you a larger tank. Weighing them without gas keep everyone on an even field, and doesn't discourage them from adding fuel capacity. Why do you think Snowtech does it like that? Because it's the most fair way to do it! If you want/need to know what your sled weighs full, it's not hard to do the math.
 

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Whether it is the most fair way to do it is opinion because SuperTrax weighs them fully fueled for the same reason. Do you think it's fair to penalize sled makers like Yamaha that have excellent fuel economy and don't need to put a heavier 13 gallon tank on their machines? This debate is dependant on your state of mind and usually based on what brand you ride. The fact is you can't ride them on empty but if it makes you feel better to believe your sled is lighter dry then have at it. You can subtract the gasolines weight to you know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
This debate is dependant on your state of mind and usually based on what brand you ride.[/b]
It doesn't have shit to do with the brand you ride. Doo's 600SDI and Yammies Nytro have the best economy of any of the performance sleds, but if I owned either of them, I would still rather have a 12 gallon tank than a 10 gallon. Unless you are one of those people that only ride in a 30 mile radius of your home base, more range is always better.

Full tanks or empty, my Crossfire is still over 100 pounds lighter than an Attak. Wow. That's like carrying a passenger everywhere you go.

The surprise for me (with those weights) was the 1000 Renegade. I realize that it's not the same chassis as the 600/800 Gade, but that 1000 must be one heavy motor.
 

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I would agree that wet, no fuel, is the best way to weight these sleds. In that state, they are essentially "ready to go", all systems operational, but no fuel. This gives all manufacturers an equal opportunity when doing weight tests.

Weighting them with fuel would be the most accurate "out the door" weight for each sled, but it is not the right way to do it if you truly want to compare the weight of one sled to another and see how well of a job the manufacturer's did at keeping the sled weights down. All of the variables have to be equal to have a correct comparison, and wet with no fuel or completely dry is about as good as a guy can get these days.
 

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wet, no gas is the way

what do you think about oil - I was going to say only 1 qt should be added (so they don't make smaller oil tanks) but that would give 2 strokes advantage over 4 strokes b/c wet means "ready to run", cant run motor w/o oil!

I think full oil may be the way to go
 
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