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2012 TZ1 Touring
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I would think that as long as you are up front with the buyer, you can at least have a clear conscience. As long as they know about the issue, and who to contact to get it rectified, it's OK.

They may choose to move on, don't know if they are already aware of the situation. If I was a buyer, that's what I would want. I can decide to buy, then its on me.
 

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When I traded off the 2021 the other week the dealer knew it was recalled and said they are hoping for a quick fix and it was on them. Not sure how a private sale would feel or if they could force you to take it back.
 

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The laws on this vary from state to state. Most areas you have no concern but in others you must disclose the recall and if not you are open to losing everything. That said, other than New York, who’s laws I do not know, most liberal states do mot support snowmobiling and therefore the laws on this are not as harsh.
 

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The laws on this vary from state to state. Most areas you have no concern but in others you must disclose the recall and if not you are open to losing everything. That said, other than New York, who’s laws I do not know, most liberal states do mot support snowmobiling and therefore the laws on this are not as harsh.
up to this point ny has been surprisingly supportive of sleds. adk group in the adirondacks hates them, but they are a green group. the state knows the economy upstate is dependent on sleds in the winter. ny laws in general are actually pretty harsh , but that's if a liberal da wants to push it
 

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Polaris '20 INDY 550 Adv 144 / Polaris '23 Switchback 650 XC 144
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I strongly doubt there are snowmobile specific laws that answer OP's question. If OP really wants the "right answer" OP needs to ask a lawyer in his/her jurisdiction. Legal questions are best answered with a "risk lens". If you are interested in a generic internet response that in no way is a substitute for actual legal advice I offer a few thoughts:

If you are very risk-conservative, then the only risk free sale is no sale in an ambiguous situation

If you are risk-moderate, then disclose the recall (and any others affecting the sled that you are aware of) and get AS IS in writing. Writing AS IS on the back of a check is often insufficient. Do a quick sales commemoration note that the buyer signs.

If you are risk-ignoring, then just sell AS IS in the ad/listing and sleep well.

I for one would choose the middle ground.
 

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When I traded off the 2021 the other week the dealer knew it was recalled and said they are hoping for a quick fix and it was on them. Not sure how a private sale would feel or if they could force you to take it back.
I know here in connecticut if i sell a bike, boat or snowmobile and write the bos ''as is'' the buyer cannot come back on you no matter what.
 

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I traded in my 2015 Ram last year because it had cam & lifter failure on cylinder #5. The dealer put my truck on his lot the next day, full well knowing that the engine needed $5k of work. Using my spam email address, I inquired about the truck online. They said that it had no known problems and was being sold as-is. Some poor guy bought that truck only to get a surprise. However, I was pretty sneaky about printing out my maintenance history tracking spreadsheet. I hid copies in a few easy and a few hard-to-find spots, so that hopefully the new owner would know that this was a known issue.

Sellers can pretty much get away with anything. Buyer beware. If you buy any used vehicles, always check for active recalls.
 

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I traded in my 2015 Ram last year because it had cam & lifter failure on cylinder #5. The dealer put my truck on his lot the next day, full well knowing that the engine needed $5k of work. Using my spam email address, I inquired about the truck online. They said that it had no known problems and was being sold as-is. Some poor guy bought that truck only to get a surprise. However, I was pretty sneaky about printing out my maintenance history tracking spreadsheet. I hid copies in a few easy and a few hard-to-find spots, so that hopefully the new owner would know that this was a known issue.

Sellers can pretty much get away with anything. Buyer beware. If you buy any used vehicles, always check for active recalls.
here in ny the misfires would prevent an inspection
 

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I traded in my 2015 Ram last year because it had cam & lifter failure on cylinder #5. The dealer put my truck on his lot the next day, full well knowing that the engine needed $5k of work. Using my spam email address, I inquired about the truck online. They said that it had no known problems and was being sold as-is. Some poor guy bought that truck only to get a surprise. However, I was pretty sneaky about printing out my maintenance history tracking spreadsheet. I hid copies in a few easy and a few hard-to-find spots, so that hopefully the new owner would know that this was a known issue.

Sellers can pretty much get away with anything. Buyer beware. If you buy any used vehicles, always check for active recalls.
Thats why you dont buy a trade in.Dealers are a dumping ground for junk.
 

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Polaris '20 INDY 550 Adv 144 / Polaris '23 Switchback 650 XC 144
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Thats why you dont buy a trade in.Dealers are a dumping ground for junk.
A mixed bag in my experience, sometimes they can pass along junk, others actually fix stuff up and are safer than buying out of some guy’s garage unless you really know what to look for. I suppose it is a reminder to only do business with those you trust.
 
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