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Discussion Starter #1
Wondering if anyone else feels this pain. My brother and i have coined the term “arctic cat knuckles”. These things give so much feedback in the handlebars on a bumpy day. Every Sunday it hurts to open and close my hands. I’m surprised I’ve never heard complaints about this but maybe it’s a standard for all modern day 2 strokes? Dad and mom are both on power steering apexes and you don’t feel the bumps in your hands at all.
 

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What are you riding? I've been on cat since early 2000's and aside from my hand falling asleep once in awhile, I've never experienced that. Maybe hanging on too tight with all the power on tap???

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Discussion Starter #4
What are you riding? I've been on cat since early 2000's and aside from my hand falling asleep once in awhile, I've never experienced that. Maybe hanging on too tight with all the power on tap???

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I have had 800 1100T and 600. I get it with all 3. the 1100T seems to have less feedback with the weight up front.
I do classify myself as an aggressive rider. I don't let bumps slow me down unless they are moguls. Maybe it time for me to go easier on myself.
 

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I have had 800 1100T and 600. I get it with all 3. the 1100T seems to have less feedback with the weight up front.
I do classify myself as an aggressive rider. I don't let bumps slow me down unless they are moguls. Maybe it time for me to go easier on myself.
well here's your chance to dump a lot of money on shocks. Only cost you over 3 grand for a set of Axis shocks from Penske Racing. That will change your ride
 

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Discussion Starter #7
well here's your chance to dump a lot of money on shocks. Only cost you over 3 grand for a set of Axis shocks from Penske Racing. That will change your ride
Not sure if that will solve the problems. i feel it less with the qs3's compared to the fox floats but still definitely feel it. brother is in a 21 limited this year and still gets it. I honestly think its just the design of the procross steering. Not willing to spend 3K to figure out if its a shock thing or just a flaw in the design.
 

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Not sure if that will solve the problems. i feel it less with the qs3's compared to the fox floats but still definitely feel it. brother is in a 21 limited this year and still gets it. I honestly think its just the design of the procross steering. Not willing to spend 3K to figure out if its a shock thing or just a flaw in the design.
I have at the moment an 18 and a 20 with iAct. Neither effects my arms. I feel little to nothing through the bars. Fairly aggressive rider. My 20 rides better but again it has iAct and is a 137.
 

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I am using the iso-vibe riser mount on my ZR8000. This has eliminated the vibrations at the bars. I am using the red rubber bushings which I believe are the softer of the options available. This is available from grip/n/rip.
 

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I am using the iso-vibe riser mount on my ZR8000. This has eliminated the vibrations at the bars. I am using the red rubber bushings which I believe are the softer of the options available. This is available from grip/n/rip.
Looks interesting. I will give it a shot. we have 3 procross's in the fleet right now so it will be cool to go back and forth to see the difference.
 

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I posted this a while ago.... go to home depot and get a tube of Silicone and pump it into the end of bars filling the bars with the silicone absorbs the harmonics. also insulates them for heaters...or the isolaters wrk aswell
 

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I had a very modified Skidoo sled I had built that went 82 mph on Radar, scary back then with ski width being so narrow even after I widened it it still was something to hang on to at speed.
 

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I posted this a while ago.... go to home depot and get a tube of Silicone and pump it into the end of bars filling the bars with the silicone absorbs the harmonics. also insulates them for heaters...or the isolaters wrk aswell
I have done this as well with "great stuff" foam. It does help. But I'm thinking also that you are gripping the bars too tight. In motocross there is a thing called "arm pump" and it can lead to injury. I remember a few guys having issues with that. My wife has arthritis pretty bad in her hands and she will do 200+ mile days on her Procross Cat and never complains about this. Relax your grip a little (easier said than done) and make a conscience effort not to squeeze the grips so hard.
 

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slow huh, ok you wanna see what 80mph is like with no carbides, cleats and no studs, 29" ski stance and 4 inches of skid travel? And hardly any brakes!
Brakes are for sissies and suspension is for chumps. In all seriousness though, why did ArcticCat hold on to cleated tracks for so long? My earliest memories of snowmobiling were checking and replacing cleats on my friends Cat. It was a revelation when his grandfather bought an 82 ski doo with a rubber track.
 

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In my situation I have had some luck with rotating the bars and changing the position. Basically, I try to adjust the grips to be straight out which means tilting the riser forward a bit along with bar rotation. The newer and smaller diameter grips also help. I feel the difference when I hop on the sleds with big grips. I also turn the ski adjusters to the low compression settings in stutters to smooth out the ride.
I have found that with adjustments, I can change my gripping style. It also allows me to essentially set my hands on the top of the grips. I use less palm grip. My calluses move to the base of my fingers and outer palm. One difference with the grip style is throttle position comfort. I rotate the throttle down a bit more and use the flat pad of my thumb to push up/forward on the lever instead of gripping to push.
 

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My hands used to go numb when I had crotch rockets, but there's a lot of weight on your hand just from the seating position.

Can't recall it happening while sledding though, at least not in the last 10 yrs.

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Brakes are for sissies and suspension is for chumps. In all seriousness though, why did ArcticCat hold on to cleated tracks for so long? My earliest memories of snowmobiling were checking and replacing cleats on my friends Cat. It was a revelation when his grandfather bought an 82 ski doo with a rubber track.
Why did they? Well back then the only other tracks were full molded rubber and those ran with sleds that had bogey wheels. Trouble with bogeys is they flipped and you'd have to stop and flip them back. Those only had as much travel as the the rotation of the torsion spring, about a couple inches. And there was no studs. With Cat the reason was they were the only ones with "Slide Suspension" so the slides needed something to slide on, so they ran right on the cleats. You could get Cat Claws which bolted on (or in) the cleat, sort of helped on ice, sort of! it wasn't till all the other companies went to slide suspension that bogeys disappeared and a few more years and there was the new molded, and clipped track, that's what you have today. Cleats were dynamite on a snow covered field, terrible on ice. Busted cleats sucked, first time I was looking for a long lever rivet gun.

Ya those were the days, 3 gallon gas tanks 30/to 1 oil pre-mixed fuel, no carbides, no studs, no brakes, open face helmets with a scarf covering your face and ski goggles. We rode 100's of miles that way.
 
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