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Finally decided to put ~156 studs in the F7 snopro. I"m just looking for ideas, suggestions, tips on what will make installation easier, anything that anyone has done that may be helpful. I already know about not studding the outer belt as well as the center, so if anyone has some tips, let's hear 'em! Thanks!!
 

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Take a few moments and drop the skid down and out if you way,it will make your job alot easier with 0 risk of punching holes where they shouldn't be.It will also allow you to double check all the suspension bolts and nuts much easier.m2c
 

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A lot of ways to do it, here's what I do. I don't drop the skid. I take the belt off and turn off fuel if you can. I push the skis against a wall before raising back end. I take off the flap and I put a saw horse under each side up by the foot wells. Buy or make a templete (I make one always, but you need to be careful). Eyeball the template to make sure it will put the studs in the right (safe) spot. Mark the entire track with touch up paint using template. Make sure you have a sharp track bit and drill your holes (you will need to sharpen the bit). I use a cordless drill that fits easily up into the tunnel and drill all holes into a blank spot in the skid. Helps to have a buddy for putting in the studs. Have them hold the stud head as you put on the nut. I loctite my threads too.

I'm sure there are other/better ways...but this has worked for me...Marc
 

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I added an eyebolt in the ceiling of the garage. Leaving the sled on the trailer with the tie down still on the skis, I use a tie down strap to lift the rear end up (after dropping the suspension). That way you can stand up and work.
 

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The fastest and easiest way I have found is the following.

1- Remove the snowflap
2- Either put the rear bumper on a jackstand or attach a tie down strap or chain to the rear bumper and then the other end to either an eye bolt in the ceiling. We usually stud in our shop, and tie off to an engine hoist.
3-Remove the belt from the machine
4-Depending on how high you get the rear of the machine, you can sit on a bucket, milk crate or even a regular chair. Whatever is most comfortable.
5- If you are using a template, lay the template on the track and mark all of your holes. A white paint pen or track marker works well.
6- Go back and check your marks.
7-Go back and check your marks.
8- Then use a new track cutter and cut your holes. Start just to the front of your rear wheels and in back of the suspension. There is plenty of room to cut the holes and not hit anything behind the track.
9- Roll the track forward or back, so that your next set of marks in the track are at about the same location as the last set you cut. And just check to make sure you still have clearance. I have used both an electric drill and cordless. If you use a cordless, just make sure you have a spare battery in the charger. Also, if using a new cutter, it should get you through one track without sharpening.
10- Once you cut all your holes. You can add the studs.
11- Seperate all your studs, backers and nuts.
12- Put a small dab of Red Loctite on each stud.
13- Put the stud on a torx socket, on a ratchet and push it up through the hole in the track.
13- Add your backing plate and screw the nut on starting it by hand.
14- Then tighten down your nut. Again, we use a small air gun to do this. I am sure you can use a socket and another ratchet, but I am not sure what the Torque should be. We have done so many tracks now, you can just see when you are tight.
Another tip is if you have someone to hold the ratchet with the stud on it up through the hole and someone else adding the backer and tighting the nut, it goes alot faster.
15- If you are using square backing plates, I highly recommend using a backing plate indexer to make sure you backers are aligned. All you do, is put the indexer on a socket, place over the stud and backer and twist until your backing plate is square.
16- Once done, put your snowflap back on, put the belt back on and you are ready to ride.

Hope this helps.
 

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Like all the above have stated, suspend rear of sled from ceiling, pull flap off, mark pattern layout all the pieces, ORDER PIZZA with beer, invite sled head ridding buddies over and have a studding party, it sure does make it a lot easier.
 

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Remove belt
roll on side
drill holes in track in the middle area of skid frame where there is nothing to hit with corded drill - my 18v Milwaukee cordless isn't fast enough.
Push studs through and put backer an nut on then hold with t handled allen and tighten with drill.
Finish tightening by hand with rachet

THEN don't forget to add appropiate carbide runners - I love my 7 1/2" Shaper Bars

Finally roll the sled back on its feet , put the belt back on and enjoy the ride!

BTW I use 153 1.45" with a 2-3-4 pattern and a mix of double and single backers
 

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one thing to add, make sure your drill is a high rpm type, get that bit spinning, so that you heat the hole up to sear the cords in the track. Iam trying my own pattern, I have the Sno Pro track and I am trying a 128 studs to start, If I don't like it and need more I'll only add as necessary, trying to save on rotating weight. THe sp track weighs almost an additional 6 lbs. over the 1" standard track.
 

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When cutting through track with stud tool, I have a propane torch next to me to heat up the tip of the cutting tool. This will burn the inside fibers of the track while cutting, ensuring you don't pull cords.

It also helps cut through faster. Careful though, you'll have a bunch of black burning/smoking pellets all over your floor.
 
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