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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I took my 136'd Edge out for a ride yesterday after moving the rear scissor stops forward in hopes of curing some bottoming I was experiencing on what I thought were medium sized rollers.

This seems to have helped the problem, but not cured it. When I brought the sled back home and was looking it over, I noticed the following:

Bumper height if I lift it up and let go is 24 3/8"
If I sit on it, the height is 20 3/8"
After sitting on it, height is 22 3/8"

I also noticed that when I lift up all the way on the rear that the front of the skid lifts off the track and leaves a 3/8" gap between the track clips and the hyfax near the front of the rails. If I apply weight to the skid and then get off the sled, the hyfax sits on the track clips (22 3/8" measurement)

Any help would be appreciated. For the most part, the sled soaks up bumps really well, but something doesn't seem right. The rear track shock (PPS) was just rebuilt.

Thanks in advance.

EDIT: forgot to say that I have the springs on the highest setting. I haven't verified what rate the springs are (not sure if they're stock?)
 

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Best guess w/o more info (assuming suspension isn't broken or binding somewhere, sled is sitting flat on ground, not on dollies) is that you likely have too much preload on the front (ski) springs.

To check, back completely off on those adjusting collars, then preload 3 or 4 turns, no more. See if that doesn't
help.

On the bottoming thing, your weight and rear block location?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm roughly 200lbs. I'll take pictures of the skid when I get home.

That being said I did raise the front end of the sled before I went out west last year in hopes of gaining some ground clearance and not being a snowplow. Come to think of it, that's when I noticed the strange rear skid behaviour.

Any way to keep the front end up like this and fix the rear, or should I drop the front back down?
 

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For trail, I'd drop the front end. For powder, I'd look into dropping front of skid.

The plan for powder is to try to distribute the weight as evenly as possible - front/middle/rear. When you put the extra preload on the front, you likely hurt yourself for your intended purpose. What that did was spread weight that had been previously on the middle, to the front and rear. You picked up one end of the teeter-totter - leaving most of the weight on each end.......none in the middle. -Al
 

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Sorry, no help here on that. Flatlander only, have never looked into it. Maybe somebody over at SnoWest?

Edit: Would caution that dropping the front cross shaft enough by itself can lead to a situation that stretches the track as the suspension collapses, making setup difficult/impossible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Can I let my limiter straps in the front out a little to remove some ski pressure and retain the higher front height?

Thanks in advance.

EDIT: this should also drop the front of the skid down to a normal position, correct?
 

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Can I let my limiter straps in the front out a little to remove some track pressure and retain the higher front height?

Thanks in advance.[/b]
That should give you less ski pressure, be better in deep snow, and should hook up better out of the hole.
 

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What Dave said. Sounds like you've got the idea now.....

Edit: Just thought of something else. Letting the strap out doesn't necessarily take weight off the skis at standstill. You'd need to increase the spring pressure there to do that....
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yes, I know one limiter strap is missing, it was actually broken. My new ones are here, I just have to put them in.










Thanks to XcSpecial, who faxed me the polaris 136 kit setup.

1. It states that the spring roller should be moved to the rear most hole, it's currently in the front most hole - DO I MOVE IT?
2. It states that for riders over 200lbs or with a 136" track that the shock mount should be in the rear mount hole - DO I MOVE IT?
3. I can't find any markings on my springs that would indicate what stiffness they are, does anyone know where it should be stamped?

Thanks in advance.
 

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The Polaris 136" setup/settings are totally not relevant to what you are doing with the extended 121". The 136" Polaris rails move the rear arm back in the tunnel and rails, about 2". Your rear arm obviously hasn't moved a bit with the extensions.

Move the spring rollers if needed to get your 3" sag measurement. Otherwise, leave it.

You've likely got the standard .375 springs. Measure to confirm if you'd like. They're all you need unless you're totally nuts in the bumps or over 300lbs.

Maybe you know, but thought I'd mention, that front strap would normally use a bolt on each end, to form a loop on each end - not the one big loop like I think I'm seeing in the picture?

The rear stop is something you could try where it's at, but guessing it's going to be coupling up early and giving an extra stiff ride because of that. The trick to using the back hole is to find a couple of large flat washers and grind/cut a flat spot in them nearly to the id. The washers then go on the bolt between the block and rail, cut side toward the extensions, forming kind of a pad so the block sits squarely. Much harder to write than do, and very worth the trouble. With clickers, you can also move the block even further back using the top front extension fastener hole. Just drill it out to 3/8"....
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I had the setup you describe on the rear block, and it bottomed out a lot worse than it does now. I moved the spring rollers to the rear most setting. I have roughly 2.5-3" of sag now.

Is there a measurement I should shoot for on the front limiter strap? The way you see it is how it was when I bought it. Is that considered to be too tight being doubled over the way it is? I don't know what they typically look like. I'll be putting in new straps tomorrow and want to do it right but was considering dropping the front a little bit to try and figure this situation out a little.

My next step is to get a good shock for the back end and have someone reputable go through it.
 

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The reason it bottomed out easier with the block moved back is coupling. Once the link comes back and hits the RRSS, to collapse any further the front spring has to collapse also. Effectively doubles the spring rates to go any further - lumber wagon effect. Moving the block forward, especially with too much sag, is a gauranteed rough ride. Moving the block back wouldn't let the suspension couple as easily, and because the sag was set too high, let you bottom easier.

With the sag set like you have it , and the blocks in the middle, betting you're set to see a big difference in ride.

With stock Polaris straps, set them up as long as possible to start, go from there if you have a problem you can't deal with any other way.

I hear Jerry at jbshocks.com has the PPS figured out. Shipping shock here to Detroit may be worth your trouble. He's been looking for somebody to try a clicker set up on one of those if I remember right.......
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Your explanation makes total sense.

I'd love to try a clicker setup on this thing. I'm going to put the straps in tonight as you and XC Special suggest. I'll leave the spring roller in the rear hole, but I'll move the rear blocks to the back hole with the washers.

Then I'll do some testing this weekend :)

Thanks for all the help, I really appreciate it!
 

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If you go further back with the RSS (or even throw it out) you can go to a heavier rear spring and still get a good ride and excellent hookup. That's what I've done on my XTRA10. The heavy rear spring now acts as your stop theoretically, and it's never a hard abrupt stop like the plastic block - it's spring pressure. The main reason that guys have poor holeshots is as soon as the scissor hits the rear stop the track breaks loose and they start to spin. If you take the block out of the equation all together and let the spring control the weight transfer, you don't break loose and you maintain power to the ground.
I'm running aftermarket heavy springs on the lightest setting.

And yes, I'd have to agree that the straps should not be like that. Two bolts, one on either end. Maybe someone can post a pic?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Dave, when I looked at the broken strap that came out, I knew something was wrong right away. Too many holes for it to be in that position.

I'd like to keep the rear scissor stops as I've been known to do a bit of jumping, but I will move them back for sure.
 

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Wow, good stuf.
Put a 03 edge under my Storm last year.
Made such a big diff. i havent really messed with it yet.
Rides great, but after reading this i might have to plat around a little.
When i ran grass drags this past fall, i did take the rss blocks off,your right it really hooks up.
 
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