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Ok, that sales pitch for VES still didn't fully answer the oil flow question. Once the oil has done it's job lubricating the turbo, where does it go? Return to the tank? Return to the base and into the combustion process?
 

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Ok, that sales pitch for VES still didn't fully answer the oil flow question. Once the oil has done it's job lubricating the turbo, where does it go? Return to the tank? Return to the base and into the combustion process?
My understanding is it is consumed in the combustion process. Just adds a slight increase in oil usage. A ball bearing turbo doesn't need much oil. An Aerocharger turbo uses a wick fed oiling system and the small reservoir lasts a very long time.
 

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23 650 Adventure, 22 850 Assault, 21 XC 650 137
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No different than the crank bearings in a two stroke. A thin film of oil is all that is needed. We have hundreds of pumps at work with ball bearings that run at 3600 rpm 24/7/365 on an oil mist system. No wet sump, just an atomized oil mist that is supplied to the housing.
 

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Ok, that sales pitch for VES still didn't fully answer the oil flow question. Once the oil has done it's job lubricating the turbo, where does it go? Return to the tank? Return to the base and into the combustion process?
There is no oil return on the RMK boost sleds and the trail versions will likely be the same. Polaris claims only 2% more oil usage on a boosted 850 vs a NA Patriot even with the oil sent to the turbo being solely used to lube the ball bearing.
 

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Ok, that sales pitch for VES still didn't fully answer the oil flow question. Once the oil has done it's job lubricating the turbo, where does it go? Return to the tank? Return to the base and into the combustion process?
There are two places the small amount of oil (2% of total oil usage) pumped to the Center Hub Rotating Assembly (CHRA) of the turbocharger, can go.

1. Past the Compressor Impeller and into the intake air going to the engine. Very little oil does this because there is some pressure from the air being pressurized.

2. Past the Exhaust Turbine and into the hot exhaust exiting to the muffler


There is NO return line to the oil reservoir/sump, as used in most four stroke turbochargers, lubricated by engine oil.
 
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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
the p-85b robs 5 h.p. plus at 8000 rpm. even more above that. the pb-80 about 1. and it stays cooler then the p-85. test by CV-TECH. also the p-85 is about worn out between 3500-4000. the pb-80 28,000 miles. again tested on there clutch test unit that is computer controlled varying load, rpm, etc. with a belt and driven clutch. ran straight no relief until vibration was bad enough to stop it or belt blew. in the case of the belt they just changed it.. we have a lot of these in the field. every customer very satisfied with them. tuning? takes 5 minutes to add subtract weights. no spring involved. one nut and half the clutch comes apart. no puller needed to change weight. got to love the mouth runners on here who have zero experience with these? just like a patriot boost. we have one. it ran it good when it stayed running. 4 issue's in 400 miles. and i bet the clutch doesn't last beyond 3000. nice $23,000 pos. better hope the bugs are worked out on the trail boost coming? again a lot think they know or just link shit from other's. we don't do that. we will always post the good the bad and the ugly. like it or not.
 

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the p-85b robs 5 h.p. plus at 8000 rpm. even more above that. the pb-80 about 1. and it stays cooler then the p-85. test by CV-TECH. also the p-85 is about worn out between 3500-4000. the pb-80 28,000 miles. again tested on there clutch test unit that is computer controlled varying load, rpm, etc. with a belt and driven clutch. ran straight no relief until vibration was bad enough to stop it or belt blew. in the case of the belt they just changed it.. we have a lot of these in the field. every customer very satisfied with them. tuning? takes 5 minutes to add subtract weights. no spring involved. one nut and half the clutch comes apart. no puller needed to change weight. got to love the mouth runners on here who have zero experience with these? just like a patriot boost. we have one. it ran it good when it stayed running. 4 issue's in 400 miles. and i bet the clutch doesn't last beyond 3000. nice $23,000 pos. better hope the bugs are worked out on the trail boost coming? again a lot think they know or just link shit from other's. we don't do that. we will always post the good the bad and the ugly. like it or not.
I may be wrong but I don’t remember you having a boost at all last season. Now you have one and somehow put 400 miles on since the snow was extinct in the East. Were you running it on a lake? What were the 4 issues you encountered during your 400 miles of riding in the off-season? Again I may be wrong but I don’t recall that you had a boost.
 

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Notice that the power to the outer movable sheave is all transferred by the steel cover via a thin hex hole. Looks pretty fragile to me.
Looks are deceiving, I have one that has been on my last 4 skidoo 4 strokes. Over 40,000 miles with only yearly cleaning. They do run warmer than the E drive skidoo clutch, but never had any belt issues. But never had any belt issues on any of my Polaris P85, and never wore one out in 3000 miles. Maybe I am just to easy on my sleds?
 

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Looks are deceiving, I have one that has been on my last 4 skidoo 4 strokes. Over 40,000 miles with only yearly cleaning. They do run warmer than the E drive skidoo clutch, but never had any belt issues. But never had any belt issues on any of my Polaris P85, and never wore one out in 3000 miles. Maybe I am just to easy on my sleds?
I too never have any of the reported issues with the P85.
As for the PB80, how do you change belt side clearance? How about change the rate of shift based on pipe temp gradually increasing?
 

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I too never have any of the reported issues with the P85.
As for the PB80, how do you change belt side clearance? How about change the rate of shift based on pipe temp gradually increasing?
Clearance is preset, and never had a problem. Pipe temp increase was not an issue on the 4 strokes. I have only had the PB80 on 4 strokes and dont know of many on 2 strokes, so I can only talk about how well they hold up, and belt heat on them. Well built and easy to adjust, but dont know if they are a great product for 2 strokes.
 

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Worked with a power block years ago. Not a bad clutch for general riding but limited for tuning.
Here's a P85 with 6500 miles. Gets cleaned every 700 to 1000 miles. Still tight, rollers are good, belt to sheave clearance good and sled runs great.

Wheel Automotive tire Helmet Tire Vehicle brake
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
ask lenn johnson about the p-85 clutch wear problems. he rides extremely hard. i rebuild his clutches. if you keep them clean there will last longer. if nothing done to them then they are worn out in the mileage i said. again i see 150-160 sleds per year. big difference from a single owner or week-end warrior. there are a lot of moving parts in a p-85 clutch. moveable sheave bushing and weight bushings the biggest problem. about every clutch i take off have spider damage from weights hitting them and wearing a groove in them. some with under 2000 miles.
 
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