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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
January 8, 2008
Contact: James Jennings, Executive Director, 518-624-3849

ASSOCIATION URGES SNOWMOBILE SAFETY
Early Season Accidents Prompt Safety Message.


Long Lake, NY – With the snowmobile season underway, state association officials are concerned about several recent snowmobile accidents, including some that resulted in fatalities. The New York State Snowmobile Association (NYSSA) wants to remind snowmobilers to take proper precautions to have a safe ride.

“Snowmobiling is a rewarding and enjoyable sport,” says Jim Jennings, NYSSA Executive Director, who adds that “observing speed limits and taking the proper safety measures will help ensure that it stays that way.”

Jennings notes that officials from the NYS Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (OPRHP) blame excessive speed for many snowmobile accidents. The maximum allowable speed for snowmobiling in New York is 55 mph, unless otherwise posted, but paying attention to local trail conditions is paramount to safe riding. “Many trails are routed on terrain where slower speeds are prudent, so exercising caution in unfamiliar areas is important” Jennings says.

NYSSA member clubs are responsible for installing signs along snowmobile routes to provide direction to riders as well as noting hazards along the trail. Many of this season’s accidents occurred along local roadways or other areas away from the official trails. In fact, according to the American Council of Snowmobile Associations (ACSA), only about 10-15% of snowmobile incidents occur on well maintained and designed trails where as much as 80-90% of all snowmobile riding takes place. Snowmobiling on roadways requires additional caution in order to avoid collisions with other motor vehicles, and riding in unsigned areas may expose the operator to unseen hazards. “Know where you ride, and ride where you know,” Jennings advises, adding that conditions change constantly.

One recent fatality occurred along the Erie Canal towpath in Canastota, NY. The preliminary report from NYS Parks Police indicated that imprudent speed was the chief factor in that accident, causing the operator to lose control of the snowmobile and strike a tree. The Erie Canal is one trail area that is posted at 25 mph. Other routes have reduced speed limits, and many towns and villages have adopted ordinances that set maximum snowmobile speeds within their jurisdictions.

Dave Perkins, NYSSA Trails Coordinator, agrees that attention to safety should not be overlooked. “The best was to ensure a safe snowmobiling experience is to pay attention and ride within the appropriate speed,” and adds that “additional care should be taken when riding at night.” Perkins stresses that riding at excessive speed at night can cause snowmobilers to outrun their headlights. By the time the rider sees a hazard, it might be too late to avoid.

Perkins offers the following tips from the ACSA:
• Respect and obey trail, speed and other signs.
• Respect land owners’ property when a trail runs through their private property.
• Respect others who use the trails, like other snowmobilers, cross country skiers, hikers, snowshoe users and dogsleds.
• Use slow speeds to prevent injury to yourself and others who may be ahead of you, around turns, corners and over blind hills.
• Speed limits should be obeyed at all times. This is not only for your safety, but for the safety of others.
• Respect the groomers, the machines that plow the snow and restore the trails you ride.
• Be safe and courteous at all times. Each time you ride your snowmobile, you should portray that snowmobilers take safety seriously.
Snowmobilers may visit the NYSSA Website at www.nyssnowassoc.org/ for more information.

January 13-19 is International Snowmobile Safety Week, for more information go www.snowmobile.org.


Respectfully,



James P. Jennings, Executive Director
PO Box 612
Long Lake NY 12847-0612
Tel: 888-624-3849 Fax: 518-624-2441
[email protected]
 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
January 8, 2008
Contact: James Jennings, Executive Director, 518-624-3849

ASSOCIATION URGES SNOWMOBILE SAFETY
Early Season Accidents Prompt Safety Message.


Long Lake, NY – With the snowmobile season underway, state association officials are concerned about several recent snowmobile accidents, including some that resulted in fatalities. The New York State Snowmobile Association (NYSSA) wants to remind snowmobilers to take proper precautions to have a safe ride.

“Snowmobiling is a rewarding and enjoyable sport,” says Jim Jennings, NYSSA Executive Director, who adds that “observing speed limits and taking the proper safety measures will help ensure that it stays that way.”

Jennings notes that officials from the NYS Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (OPRHP) blame excessive speed for many snowmobile accidents. The maximum allowable speed for snowmobiling in New York is 55 mph, unless otherwise posted, but paying attention to local trail conditions is paramount to safe riding. “Many trails are routed on terrain where slower speeds are prudent, so exercising caution in unfamiliar areas is important” Jennings says.

NYSSA member clubs are responsible for installing signs along snowmobile routes to provide direction to riders as well as noting hazards along the trail. Many of this season’s accidents occurred along local roadways or other areas away from the official trails. In fact, according to the American Council of Snowmobile Associations (ACSA), only about 10-15% of snowmobile incidents occur on well maintained and designed trails where as much as 80-90% of all snowmobile riding takes place. Snowmobiling on roadways requires additional caution in order to avoid collisions with other motor vehicles, and riding in unsigned areas may expose the operator to unseen hazards. “Know where you ride, and ride where you know,” Jennings advises, adding that conditions change constantly.

One recent fatality occurred along the Erie Canal towpath in Canastota, NY. The preliminary report from NYS Parks Police indicated that imprudent speed was the chief factor in that accident, causing the operator to lose control of the snowmobile and strike a tree. The Erie Canal is one trail area that is posted at 25 mph. Other routes have reduced speed limits, and many towns and villages have adopted ordinances that set maximum snowmobile speeds within their jurisdictions.

Dave Perkins, NYSSA Trails Coordinator, agrees that attention to safety should not be overlooked. “The best was to ensure a safe snowmobiling experience is to pay attention and ride within the appropriate speed,” and adds that “additional care should be taken when riding at night.” Perkins stresses that riding at excessive speed at night can cause snowmobilers to outrun their headlights. By the time the rider sees a hazard, it might be too late to avoid.

Perkins offers the following tips from the ACSA:
• Respect and obey trail, speed and other signs.
• Respect land owners’ property when a trail runs through their private property.
• Respect others who use the trails, like other snowmobilers, cross country skiers, hikers, snowshoe users and dogsleds.
• Use slow speeds to prevent injury to yourself and others who may be ahead of you, around turns, corners and over blind hills.
• Speed limits should be obeyed at all times. This is not only for your safety, but for the safety of others.
• Respect the groomers, the machines that plow the snow and restore the trails you ride.
• Be safe and courteous at all times. Each time you ride your snowmobile, you should portray that snowmobilers take safety seriously.
Snowmobilers may visit the NYSSA Website at www.nyssnowassoc.org/ for more information.

January 13-19 is International Snowmobile Safety Week, for more information go www.snowmobile.org.
Respectfully,
James P. Jennings, Executive Director
PO Box 612
Long Lake NY 12847-0612
Tel: 888-624-3849 Fax: 518-624-2441
[email protected][/b]
I"ll all for safety, but what is the point of this post?
 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
January 8, 2008
Contact: James Jennings, Executive Director, 518-624-3849

ASSOCIATION URGES SNOWMOBILE SAFETY
Early Season Accidents Prompt Safety Message.


Long Lake, NY – With the snowmobile season underway, state association officials are concerned about several recent snowmobile accidents, including some that resulted in fatalities. The New York State Snowmobile Association (NYSSA) wants to remind snowmobilers to take proper precautions to have a safe ride.

“Snowmobiling is a rewarding and enjoyable sport,” says Jim Jennings, NYSSA Executive Director, who adds that “observing speed limits and taking the proper safety measures will help ensure that it stays that way.”

Jennings notes that officials from the NYS Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (OPRHP) blame excessive speed for many snowmobile accidents. The maximum allowable speed for snowmobiling in New York is 55 mph, unless otherwise posted, but paying attention to local trail conditions is paramount to safe riding. “Many trails are routed on terrain where slower speeds are prudent, so exercising caution in unfamiliar areas is important” Jennings says.[/b]

Read between the lines. Lower speed limit is not far off IMO.
 

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I"ll all for safety, but what is the point of this post?[/b]
To remind people to be safe!
 

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justification for over-governing the sport?[/b]
Justification (that's a big word for a simple minded person such as yourself) that your a jackass!

Simply put - Ride with some common sense not by the seat of your pants so you don't become another statistic.
 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
January 8, 2008
Contact: James Jennings, Executive Director, 518-624-3849



One recent fatality occurred along the Erie Canal towpath in Canastota, NY. The preliminary report from NYS Parks Police indicated that imprudent speed was the chief factor in that accident, causing the operator to lose control of the snowmobile and strike a tree. The Erie Canal is one trail area that is posted at 25 mph. Other routes have reduced speed limits, and many towns and villages have adopted ordinances that set maximum snowmobile speeds within their jurisdictions.[/b]

Gary, sledshed, did you see this part?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Exactly, police yourself. The government isn't the one killing riders, the riders are doing it to themselves. Because they can't ride within reason and where they should be. Every joe shmoe thinks they are the next snocross rider, and doing that on the trail is what brings this on. The people who get angry at these posts are most often the biggest ones that violate these rules and ideas. So complain some more - stand up, raise your hand and tell the world what an idiot you are on your machine.
Have a terrific day!
;)
 

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Exactly, police yourself. The government isn't the one killing riders, the riders are doing it to themselves. Because they can't ride within reason and where they should be. Every joe shmoe thinks they are the next snocross rider, and doing that on the trail is what brings this on. The people who get angry at these posts are most often the biggest ones that violate these rules and ideas. So complain some more - stand up, raise your hand and tell the world what an idiot you are on your machine.
Have a terrific day!
;)[/b]
Well said :thumbsup:
 

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Ummmmm, I don't think it is riders thinking they are snocross racers that is the problem. I think it is riders who are unfamiliar with their snowmobiles, unfamiliar with the area they are riding in and in some cases familiar with alcohol. Unfortunately, policing it ourselves isn't going to work, there are too many unresponsible riders who think it is their right to use the entire trail, or ride from bar to bar and drink alcohol. Honestly, I think its BS that there are riders out there that don't look through a turn for oncoming traffic, there are riders out there that don't keep there eyes up ahead and instead are looking down and most of all there are riders out there, who when faced with a situation cannot control their snowmobile.

You are not going to get everyone to listen, there are just too many self-righteous, I beat my chest, neanderthals out there that are stubborn enough to think that they can ride without having the safety of every other rider in their minds.

This goes back to what I said earlier, there are some idiots that ride snowmobiles and they honestly have no idea what they are doing. A group of friends and myself were heading towards Highmarket, behind the Hideway, there are a couple 90 degree turns, I see the first guy coming towards us wash out one of the turns so I stop at least 20 feet before the turn to watch the greatness of these 4 or 5 guys negotiate the turn. Not one of them put up their hand to let me know how many were behind them, not one of them made the turn cleanly but I am sure they all felt like they knew what they were doing. From where I was sitting they have a lot to learn.
 

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Ummmmm, I don't think it is riders thinking they are snocross racers that is the problem. I think it is riders who are unfamiliar with their snowmobiles, unfamiliar with the area they are riding in and in some cases familiar with alcohol. Unfortunately, policing it ourselves isn't going to work, there are too many unresponsible riders who think it is their right to use the entire trail, or ride from bar to bar and drink alcohol.[/b]
I enjoy riding bar to bar; but I slow down after a couple beers and I don't get intoxicated. I have seen just the opposite where people go faster the more booze they have in them. That's just dangerous.

I think speed is going to be the #1 factor in almost all fatal accidents. Granted alcohol will also be a factor in some - it's the alcohol that helps people to misjudge how fast they should be going safely.

Either way the point of this post is well received by me. I certainly take it serious.
 

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Gary, sledshed, did you see this part?[/b]
Can-Am,

Yeah I did. Makes it that much harder to get a trail approved on the canal-government entity=risl adverse, we keep handing them the bullets and asking them to shoot us in the head.

Steve Lewis said he's having problems with those folks and the more accidents on the canal, the more problems he will continue to have. As I said at our club meeting-either we police ourselves or the police will do it for us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I know you can't reach everyone, but if even a handful wakes up then its a handful more than we had yesterday. Sure alcohol is generally a part of accidents, but that doesn't make up for all the a'holes that do think they are professional riders. Not having a wreck YET doesn't mean they are safe or even capable of riding a machine correctly.

No matter how fast you ride, stupidity will always catch up to you at some point!

They think just because they can go fast, that they should. You can't say for sure that those 4-5 riders that wiped the corner were even drinking, most likely just riding too fast for their ability or the capability of their machines.

And you're right, a big part of the problems is the brainiacs that sit at the bar drinking for a few hours, then ride 80mph to the next bar just to sit a drink for another few hours.
 
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