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I have to laugh. On the internet forums and social media, I see people ask about snowmobiling in Quebec and then others WHO HAVE NEVER BEEN SNOWMOBILING IN CANADA say it is nothing but boring, high-speed super highways; because they saw a photo or a video ONCE of a flat, straight divided trail in Canada, although they have NEVER been to Quebec.

I have done one snowmobile trip to Ontario, Canada and three snowmobile trips to Quebec, and yes there are a few smooth, high speed trails in Quebec but there are far more twisty and hilly trails in Quebec, plus the Quebec boondocking opportunities seem endless. Not to mention the world class grooming, food, accommodations, and hospitality.

I am not sure why people are experts on things they have NEVER done.
 

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I dont get it either lol I remember soneone who never had been snowmobiling said "its not a sport. All you do it sit there and turn right or left" ... If you ride 5 mph maybe it could be that boring and easy. He didnt realise snowmobiles could go over 40 mph. He got corrected.

My wife one time told me in her class the professor had for some reason or another talked about snowmobile sounds and why they shouldn't be allowed to have trails rear a residence or through town because they are over 100db of sound... I told her to mention that at MOST a snowmobile is only allowed to be at 78 dB from 50 feet away at full throttle. And anything over that the manufactures wouldnt be allowed to sell. And that law says aftermarket exhausts are illegal. My whole automotive engineering class was doing a study on snowmobile sound tests at that point too. That professor should have never mentioned that.

I also had a second level physics class in college with another friend who's was also in automotive engineering technology with me. A question came up on the board about electrical draw and basically the question boiled down to is the car battery dead (12v in the classes eyes was a good battery). Me and him looked at each other and was like... Thats not going to start a car. To us thats dead. But to the class it was a good battery. What is it like 12.66v is an excellent battery. The question came up on homework and after the equations it came to the battery being right at 12v... I didnt think about the class and just wrote down its not going to start the car. Of course I lost a few points. Now physics is a great thing for people to take, in fact I think everyone should have to take a physics course because its a really important thing to know. We live in it every day. But some professors should do a little more research on the answers they think are correct. In fact... Im pretty sure thats why my professors gave assignments that often come up in other classes about vehicles from other non automotive classes so we never get confused by the other professors answers. They probably got tons of those questions before that stemed from false information from those other classes.
 

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I have to laugh. On the internet forums and social media, I see people ask about snowmobiling in Quebec and then others WHO HAVE NEVER BEEN SNOWMOBILING IN CANADA say it is nothing but boring, high-speed super highways; because they saw a photo or a video ONCE of a flat, straight divided trail in Canada, although they have NEVER been to Quebec.

I have done one snowmobile trip to Ontario, Canada and three snowmobile trips to Quebec, and yes there are a few smooth, high speed trails in Quebec but there are far more twisty and hilly trails in Quebec, plus the Quebec boondocking opportunities seem endless. Not to mention the world class grooming, food, accommodations, and hospitality.

I am not sure why people are experts on things they have NEVER done.
Actually its all relative. Compared to our trails in ma, the tighter twisty trails of quebec seem like super highways....you rarely see a bunny trail in quebec. Generally if you stay on quebec's trans trails their wide flat and fast. Its secondary regional trail routes that can get pretty twisty. There can be some great off-trail/boondocking in quebec where its allowed. For the most part they prefer you to stay on their trail system. After all it would take many many trips to ride what the entire province offers.
 

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I have to laugh. On the internet forums and social media, I see people ask about snowmobiling in Quebec and then others WHO HAVE NEVER BEEN SNOWMOBILING IN CANADA say it is nothing but boring, high-speed super highways; because they saw a photo or a video ONCE of a flat, straight divided trail in Canada, although they have NEVER been to Quebec.

I have done one snowmobile trip to Ontario, Canada and three snowmobile trips to Quebec, and yes there are a few smooth, high speed trails in Quebec but there are far more twisty and hilly trails in Quebec, plus the Quebec boondocking opportunities seem endless. Not to mention the world class grooming, food, accommodations, and hospitality.

I am not sure why people are experts on things they have NEVER done.

I have ridden in Quebec, although I ride Ontario much more. You are right about world class grooming, trails and food. I'm not sure about hospitality though. Maybe we hit the wrong places but I found hospitality to be lacking at best. You know the game where they understand english but pretend they have no idea what you're saying and they make you play charades just to order breakfast or fill your sled with gas? Plus sled theft is an issue and if it happens forget ever seeing your sled again.
 

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I have ridden in Quebec, although I ride Ontario much more. You are right about world class grooming, trails and food. I'm not sure about hospitality though. Maybe we hit the wrong places but I found hospitality to be lacking at best. You know the game where they understand english but pretend they have no idea what you're saying and they make you play charades just to order breakfast or fill your sled with gas? Plus sled theft is an issue and if it happens forget ever seeing your sled again.
I have never been, but I have read more and more about those types of experiences in Quebec. I'm sure there are some nice people and places, but on the flip side I'm sure there are several assholes out there looking to get their rocks off by insulting the "stupid fat American".
 

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It won't matter if this covid thing doesn't go away soon because the boulders will remain closed.

Seriously, QC and NB have some vast trail systems (along with Ontario too).
Twisty, flat, boondocking etc. All depends on the region as well as the trail system.

Love it up there.

Some people think they're experts at everything, just ask em.

We rode from Manitoba to Maine in the early 2000s.
I saw some VERY nice Country.
I wish GoPros existed back then. What an ADVenture.

Jeff B In Maine

Sent via my US Cellular rotary dial device.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have ridden in Quebec, although I ride Ontario much more. You are right about world class grooming, trails and food. I'm not sure about hospitality though. Maybe we hit the wrong places but I found hospitality to be lacking at best. You know the game where they understand english but pretend they have no idea what you're saying and they make you play charades just to order breakfast or fill your sled with gas? Plus sled theft is an issue and if it happens forget ever seeing your sled again.
4 trips to Quebec, 3 in the winter, 1 in the summer, and have NEVER had a problem with poor hospitality. However, I always greet them in French: Bonjour = Good Day, Bonsoir = Good Evening, and just tell them my French is terrible (Mon français est terrible), and ask do you speak English (Parlez vous anglais)? And most are happy to oblige and are happy you at least made an attempt to speak their language when in their land.

That being said, I studied French for 3 years in high school and speak JUST ENOUGH to get by. And I have met some in Quebec that really don't speak English, but we always mutter our way through it with a smile.

I don't personally know anyone that has had their things stolen in Quebec and I know people who have been going 1 to 2 times a year for the last 30 years with no issues whatsoever. I am not saying that past thefts have not happened but over that last 10 to 15 years, I believe the Quebec authorities have really cracked down on theft. And the current theft of ATVs and dirt bikes within New York State has been rampant lately. That being said, avoid Montreal year-round if you can; Montreal is their Chicago. The rest of Quebec is a great place to visit.

One time, we stopped at some small po-dunk tavern, in Quebec, and ordered drinks and I also bought a drink for the local sitting next to me and the bartender. As soon as I even offered to do that, our money was no good there; extremely friendly and hospitable people.

On a side note, May 2019, my wife and I vacationed in Paris, France for a full week. And EVERYONE was extremely hospitable and no one was ever arrogant towards us. However, I did see a rude couple at the Palace of Versailles that came straight off an episode of Jersey Shore, and it was embarrassing to be anywhere near them.
 

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It won't matter if this covid thing doesn't go away soon because the boulders will remain closed.

Seriously, QC and NB have some vast trail systems (along with Ontario too).
Twisty, flat, boondocking etc. All depends on the region as well as the trail system.

Love it up there.

Some people think they're experts at everything, just ask em.

We rode from Manitoba to Maine in the early 2000s.
I saw some VERY nice Country.
I wish GoPros existed back then. What an ADVenture.

Jeff B In Maine

Sent via my US Cellular rotary dial device.
I like to say in Ontario that North Bay or Temagami is about the border line. anything south is more likely to be twisty and anything North is more likely to be wide open. I live in WNY, and there's a lot of Ontario thats just like riding at home, but there's nothing in NYS at all thats comparable to Cochrane/ Hearst.
 

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4 trips to Quebec, 3 in the winter, 1 in the summer, and have NEVER had a problem with poor hospitality. However, I always greet them in French: Bonjour = Good Day, Bonsoir = Good Evening, and just tell them my French is terrible (Mon français est terrible), and ask do you speak English (Parlez vous anglais)? And most are happy to oblige and are happy you at least made an attempt to speak their language when in their land.

That being said, I studied French for 3 years in high school and speak JUST ENOUGH to get by. And I have met some in Quebec that really don't speak English, but we always mutter our way through it with a smile.

I don't personally know anyone that has had their things stolen in Quebec and I know people who have been going 1 to 2 times a year for the last 30 years with no issues whatsoever. I am not saying that past thefts have not happened but over that last 10 to 15 years, I believe the Quebec authorities have really cracked down on theft. And the current theft of ATVs and dirt bikes within New York State has been rampant lately. That being said, avoid Montreal year-round if you can; Montreal is their Chicago. The rest of Quebec is a great place to visit.

One time, we stopped at some small po-dunk tavern, in Quebec, and ordered drinks and I also bought a drink for the local sitting next to me and the bartender. As soon as I even offered to do that, our money was no good there; extremely friendly and hospitable people.

On a side note, May 2019, my wife and I vacationed in Paris, France for a full week. And EVERYONE was extremely hospitable and no one was ever arrogant towards us. However, I did see a rude couple at the Palace of Versailles that came straight off an episode of Jersey Shore, and it was embarrassing to be anywhere near them.

I'm glad you have had such good experiences. i took French in school too but that was 37 years ago and I totally agree with you making an attempt to assimilate while in THEIR country, but I'm afraid my attempt would be so pathetic they'd feed me to the beavers! I've also experienced shitty attitudes from french Canadians in the 1000 Islands area, but it doesn't mean I wont go to either place.
 

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I like to say in Ontario that North Bay or Temagami is about the border line. anything south is more likely to be twisty and anything North is more likely to be wide open. I live in WNY, and there's a lot of Ontario thats just like riding at home, but there's nothing in NYS at all thats comparable to Cochrane/ Hearst.
Cochrane and Hearst are on my top 10 lists as far as a great places to ride. I am very happy we went through those areas. Thunder Bay ON was also pretty sweet.

Jeff B In Maine

Sent via my US Cellular rotary dial device.
 

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I have ridden in Quebec, although I ride Ontario much more. You are right about world class grooming, trails and food. I'm not sure about hospitality though. Maybe we hit the wrong places but I found hospitality to be lacking at best. You know the game where they understand english but pretend they have no idea what you're saying and they make you play charades just to order breakfast or fill your sled with gas? Plus sled theft is an issue and if it happens forget ever seeing your sled again.
I'm not sure if that still goes on today in quebec where you need to learn french to get your point across. It was that way in many places back in the 70's when i did my first snowmobile trips up there where you needed to learn some french. I can only remember one time on a bag trip back in the 90's we were treated less than one would be expected, otherwise the meals were fine, and so were our hosts....In fact on a bag trip staying in mount valins i think they went out of their way to make us feel welcome. If anything 99% of the retailers, hotel, and restaurant owners speak english far better than i speak french.
 

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4 trips to Quebec, 3 in the winter, 1 in the summer, and have NEVER had a problem with poor hospitality. However, I always greet them in French: Bonjour = Good Day, Bonsoir = Good Evening, and just tell them my French is terrible (Mon français est terrible), and ask do you speak English (Parlez vous anglais)? And most are happy to oblige and are happy you at least made an attempt to speak their language when in their land.

That being said, I studied French for 3 years in high school and speak JUST ENOUGH to get by. And I have met some in Quebec that really don't speak English, but we always mutter our way through it with a smile.

I don't personally know anyone that has had their things stolen in Quebec and I know people who have been going 1 to 2 times a year for the last 30 years with no issues whatsoever. I am not saying that past thefts have not happened but over that last 10 to 15 years, I believe the Quebec authorities have really cracked down on theft. And the current theft of ATVs and dirt bikes within New York State has been rampant lately. That being said, avoid Montreal year-round if you can; Montreal is their Chicago. The rest of Quebec is a great place to visit.

One time, we stopped at some small po-dunk tavern, in Quebec, and ordered drinks and I also bought a drink for the local sitting next to me and the bartender. As soon as I even offered to do that, our money was no good there; extremely friendly and hospitable people.

On a side note, May 2019, my wife and I vacationed in Paris, France for a full week. And EVERYONE was extremely hospitable and no one was ever arrogant towards us. However, I did see a rude couple at the Palace of Versailles that came straight off an episode of Jersey Shore, and it was embarrassing to be anywhere near them.
As far as vacationing europe i went there nearly a couple years ago to england and germany to see relatives. Believe me were respected far more in canada than countries in europe.
 

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I have had several saddlebag trips all over Quebec never an issue. Had a buddy's 70 year old Dad break down (hit a hidden rock on trail groomer coughed up Mt Valin). Limped sled to Polaris dealer. They gave buddy & his Dad the shop truck overnight to stay in hotel. Took parts off sled in showroom to fix the Pro S. Next day they arranged a trailer to transport fixed sled, son's sled & buddies to catch up with us. None of us spoke French but dealer was so accommodating. I'll never forget that.
 

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My wife one time told me in her class the professor had for some reason or another talked about snowmobile sounds and why they shouldn't be allowed to have trails rear a residence or through town because they are over 100db of sound... I told her to mention that at MOST a snowmobile is only allowed to be at 78 dB from 50 feet away at full throttle. And anything over that the manufactures wouldnt be allowed to sell. And that law says aftermarket exhausts are illegal.
In Wisconsin it's 88db at 3000prm (not full throttle) at 50 feet on the exhaust side of the sled 78db is the old 1975 rule. See the link I attached

2013 Wisconsin Statutes & Annotations :: 350. Snowmobiles. :: 350.095 Noise level requirements..
 

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I live in Québec and I noticed many employees of restaurants and hotels and all where they normally get people from US and other countries speaks a decent English. Expect a strong accent and other mistakes but it's understandable.
Hope you guys can come this winter and enjoy our trails too.
 

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We've ridden in Ontario quite a bit the past 5 or 6 seasons. Mostly start near the Sault and head North towards Wawa and on from there. Last year went East and did the ride around Algonquin. Was looking into Quebec. Rode once there like in 2003, starting out of St Raymond. Don't remember any specifics but had a great time. If you were coming from the West, say from MI (we live in IL & IN), where you would recommend starting out in Quebec? Prefer to not drive too far, but if driving a few more hours gets us into better riding conditions, it would be worth it. Normally our trips are 4 or 5 days of riding.
 

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We've ridden in Ontario quite a bit the past 5 or 6 seasons. Mostly start near the Sault and head North towards Wawa and on from there. Last year went East and did the ride around Algonquin. Was looking into Quebec. Rode once there like in 2003, starting out of St Raymond. Don't remember any specifics but had a great time. If you were coming from the West, say from MI (we live in IL & IN), where you would recommend starting out in Quebec? Prefer to not drive too far, but if driving a few more hours gets us into better riding conditions, it would be worth it. Normally our trips are 4 or 5 days of riding.
Seemed everyone we met from ontario, or the u.s. like mich. were saying in mount lauier.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
We've ridden in Ontario quite a bit the past 5 or 6 seasons. Mostly start near the Sault and head North towards Wawa and on from there. Last year went East and did the ride around Algonquin. Was looking into Quebec. Rode once there like in 2003, starting out of St Raymond. Don't remember any specifics but had a great time. If you were coming from the West, say from MI (we live in IL & IN), where you would recommend starting out in Quebec? Prefer to not drive too far, but if driving a few more hours gets us into better riding conditions, it would be worth it. Normally our trips are 4 or 5 days of riding.
If you are coming from IL and IN, I would recommend riding at least 5 days and starting and finishing in Mont Laurier, and ride North and West.
 
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