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I was working on my ZR800 with a couple of friends this weekend and we put the sled pro clutch aligment tool on my sled.. I was horrified to see how out of alignment my motor was.. The problem is you can't do anything about it with the stock motor mounts.. Both my friends said that have experienced the same problem on their zr900s and that I need to mill the holes in the motor mount plates so I can set it up properly.. So we took the plates off to get it done.. Just wondering if anyone else has used the sled pro tool and what they found on their sled?

-R.
 

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i owned and used it on my 03 900 it was quite a ways out of alignment. i ended up buying the Sno-Tek monster mount and setting it up that way. i found that drilling only made it possible for the engine to move even easier due to the fact that you are now relying on clamping pressure only...not a bolt/mount sized as one.
 

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Does this monster mount just twist it into alignment? Also is the motor suppose to be a little twisted on the pto side foward so as to offset torque? Bigtwin
 

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It is rare to find a box stock sled with a good engine allignment. They are always off. I always move the holes in the plate. If they are off to much I will weld the old holes up and redrill. If it's only slightly out I will elongate them and use 1/8 roll pins through the plate into the case. This will keep it where you want.
 

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The tools work great.Makes for a no brainer alignment.Must sleds are off right from the dealer thats where dealer prep should come into play but most dont care.The sno-tek mount does work good on the twins.You should see a increase in performance and belt life once installed and aligned.
 

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Originally posted by Alleycat35@Oct 18 2005, 08:44 AM
It is rare to find a box stock sled with a good engine allignment. They are always off. I always move the holes in the plate. If they are off to much I will weld the old holes up and redrill. If it's only  slightly out I will elongate them and use 1/8 roll pins through the plate into the case. This will keep it where you want.
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Can you give me some tips on how to align it and what is involved in drilling / welding /redrilling and or using the roll pins in the plate?
Where is a good place to buy the sled pro clutch aligment tool?
Will the clutch alignment bar from HPE do the same thing. (its a lot less money)
Thanks,
van
 

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You can get the same results without buying any special tools. The tools just make it easier. The only special tool I use is a normal off set bar that you can get for about $30. You could use a straight edge as long as you know what the offset is supposed to be. Most sleds use a 5/8" off set. But if you have the Sled Pro tool your all set.

There are three dimensions to consider when doing an engine alignment:

1) Center to Center distance.

2) Parallelism

3) Off Set

The first thing is to get the center distance correct. I believe it's 12.2 on the ZR but check to be sure. But the Sled Pro tool should work like a "Go/No Go Gauge. If the center is off try and see if you can move the engine enough to get the distance correct. I like to make it about .030 greater than the recommended dimension. I also want the left front of the engine to be about (.030) ahead of the right front which brings us to #2 Parallelism. Ultimately you want the crank shaft to jack shaft to be about 2 degrees from being parallel. The reason for this is when the sled is under load the engine wants to pull itself towards the jackshaft and you want the shafts parallel under load so by giving it those 2 degrees compensates for the load. Once you have 1 and 2 right you can set the off set. This is done by shimming the secondary.

If you cannot get enough movement you will have to modify the stock engine mount plate. Depending on how much it has to move determines the next course of action. If it's less than 1/8" off of being correct there would be no need to weld and redrill. You can just elongate the holes and roll pin it. When modifying the plate it will be necessary to remove the engine and remove the plate from the engine and reinstall the plate to the chassis without the engine on it.
The next step is to put some layout die around the four holes that attach the plate to the engine. You do not want to mess with the frame mounting holes only the ones that attach the engine to the plate. Now set the engine on the plate and go through the alignment procedure until you have the engine exactly in the right position. Mark the new hole locations by scribing around the engine's mounting bosses. Remove everything and figure out how much to move the holes so the engine will line up with the scribe marks on the plate and the bolts are not in a bind.
Install the modified plate to the engine using red Loctite and torque to specs. I use 3/16" roll pins to make sure the engine cannot shift on the plate. With the plate installed on the engine drill through the plate in a place that has enough material in the crank case casting to accommodate the roll pin. Make sure you don't drill to deep. Use some red locktite on the pins too. I use 2 pins that seems sufficient. If it's way off like 1/4" I weld all four holes and redrill and still use the pins.
 
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