Hardcore Sledder banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've taken apart enough junkers to see that many of these sleds could have been saved had the owners done even some basic maintenance on them. Ignoring maintenance causes parts to wear out, or most often, break when people finally get around to trying to fix them.

It occured to me today that while Polaris has always been an innovator in cookie-cutter sleds, making parts compatible year after year and keeping maintenance identical for long periods of times, they have (intentionally or not) at the same time ignored some very minor changes that could make their sleds much easier to keep up and repair, and in essence, have designed in planned obsolescence knowing that after x many years, the sleds will be too far gone to save.

Here are a couple things I see over and over that people neglect, but that will keep a sled alive for a long long time:

1. Keep your sled clean. Especially the engine compartment and suspension. Letting crud build up is a sure way to have parts die early due to rust and corrosion.

2. Periodically, apply lubricant to all exposed fasteners, including those on the engine and especially on the suspension pieces. WD-40 cleans the parts, but evaporates fast. Liquid Wrench lasts longer, but doesn't do as good a job at cleaning the parts. Don't forget your brake bleeder valve and all the zerk fittings on the suspension components. Next time you have your chaincase off, take off the oil and water bottles and lube your steering column as well.

3. Use anti-seize compound on all your fasteners, especially those that thread into, or go through aluminum. I see lots of sleds ruined because parts corrode in place and the bolts and nuts break off when owners try and remove them. A broken bolt in the wrong place can be very frustrating and often leads to owners scrapping the sled rather than trying to fix the problem.

4. Drain the carb tubes. All carbureted sleds have drain tubes on the bottom of the float bowls to collect any moisture or contaminants that may have found its way into your fuel. In all the years I've been rebuilding sleds, I have never bought a used sled where the owner had ever drained the tubes. They are always full of gunk and sludge. The reason is most likely that these tubes are often very hard to reach, especially middle and mag side tubes. Our solution is a simple one - next time you work on your sled, extend the tubes so they go under and extend out in front of the engine. This makes it extremely simple to drain them on a weekly basis like they are supposed to be. You'd be surprised at how much water they collect.

5. Check your intake boots. A lot of the sleds we see that were running rough, had high speed stalls or siezing problems due to leanouts had cracked or in many cases loose intake boots. We are astounded at how many sleds we get that people scrap because they run crappy only to find the owners or their mechanics never tightened the clamps on the boots!!

6. Change your brake fluid. Brake fluid is acroscopic - it sucks up moisture like a sponge. Nearly every master cylinder and caliper we get is ruined because the brake fluid was never changed. Often, when we open up the master cylinder, the fluid is full of metal shavings. Sure they still work, but just think of how much better they'd work if you had clean fresh fluid!

7. Check your bolt thightness and use a torque wrench so they're on spec. We just stripped an RXL. Many of the suspension bolts were only hand tight. Often, suspensions come to us missing bolts altogether. The jackshaft nut in the chain case needed an impact wrench to get it off, but the driveshaft bolt wasn't even tight - We removed it with our fingers.. In fact, the driveshaft, though otherwise in perfect condition, was a total loss because the loose gear hammered the splines and destroyed them.

8. Last, but not least for this post - change your chaincase oil and gasket annually. Many of the sleds we get in have NO OIL in the chaincase, or it's so old, it's thick as paste. We recommend a good synthetic chaincase oil, but anything is better than leaving the old oil in season after season.

Hope these help. If you have suggestions you'd like to add, please do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Great advice! It's really pretty easy, do the maintenance and better reliability is will come. Which means less down time when the white stuff is on the ground and more riding time.

:banana: :banana: :banana: :banana:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,931 Posts
Thanks for the time to post all that ,I made a copy.like the carb drain idea.Maybe should do the brake fluid change.Is regular brake fluid ok ,dot 2 is it, or do sleds get something else I thought I read somewhere?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,423 Posts
Originally posted by xcbullet@Sep 2 2005, 11:26 PM
Thanks for the time to post all that ,I made a copy.like the carb drain idea.Maybe should do the brake fluid change.Is regular brake fluid ok ,dot 2 is it, or do sleds get something else I thought I read somewhere?
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=859322
[/quote]
dot 3 brad,,,,,,,,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,387 Posts
dont forget also,check belt deflection and motor offset, it does get tweaked.also the clutches should be fully cleaned and inspected and any clutch springs with over 3000miles should be changed for top performance, the get sacked out quite easily.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
10,423 Posts
Originally posted by machz1@Sep 2 2005, 11:40 PM
dont forget also,check belt deflection and motor offset, it does get tweaked.also the clutches should be fully cleaned and inspected and any clutch springs with over 3000miles should be changed for top performance, the get sacked out quite easily.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=859332
[/quote]
also with polaris and doo secondaries, replace the outer bushing that the helix supports on a regular basis, due to their close proximity to each(narrow distance spaced apart)the load placed on them during hard upshifts cause undue bindage that wears the teflon lining off in approx 1000-1400 miles and hampers both upshift and backshifting, you won't believe the difference after replacement,,,,,,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
835 Posts
These are the type of posts I love seeing on here! Helpful, and each guy chiming in with his own good suggestions.

Keep this stuff up guys, because this stuff is gold. I already have a couple new things to do to my sled from these posts. I printed it out, and added these to my list.

Kudos to flylake and all of you who jumped in on this one. This is the type of stuff I come here for. :div20:
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top