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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I've read through several posts but most talk about hauling 2 or more sleds in a trailer. I bought a new sled and will need to drive around 8 - 10 hrs. to ride. I see some just load the sled in the back on the truck and go, but I would like to keep the sled as clean as possible on the drive. You never know what type of weather you will run into driving long distances. I was thinking I could cover the sled, but then you have to deal with cover flopping in the wind driving at highway speeds. What do you guys do when just hauling one sled long distances?

Thanks,
Tony
 

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they sell single place trailers too you know, if that is all you want
slop will always get on a sled in back of truck or trailer unless covered well, with a GOOD form fitting cover, and even then you will get bleed thru and slush and ice will build up pending weather conditions at time of travel!
this is why so many BUY enclosed trailers, to stop the slop and hassles with a cover that doesn;t work that well, or as well as an enclosed trailer does!

nature of the beast, if you want a clean sled, use an enclosed trailer and learn to deal with the CON"S of towing a trailer, its NOT that bad, you get used to towing after a few trips, and allows for more storage on trips to haul,m things you DON"T want inside your truck , yet again want protected from weather!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
they sell single place trailers too you know, if that is all you want
slop will always get on a sled in back of truck or trailer unless covered well, with a GOOD form fitting cover, and even then you will get bleed thru and slush and ice will build up pending weather conditions at time of travel!
this is why so many BUY enclosed trailers, to stop the slop and hassles with a cover that doesn;t work that well, or as well as an enclosed trailer does!

nature of the beast, if you want a clean sled, use an enclosed trailer and learn to deal with the CON"S of towing a trailer, its NOT that bad, you get used to towing after a few trips, and allows for more storage on trips to haul,m things you DON"T want inside your truck , yet again want protected from weather!
Thanks for the great feedback. I'll search for an enclosed trailer.
 

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I’m in the same situation...put as many miles on the truck as sled. I prefer to carry in back of truck when riding alone and only cover when weather is bad. A tight fitting cover is best...the paint still looks fine but has left a mark on the windshield. Not that it’s ideal but I would rather have a dirty sled then deal with the trailer. B.
 

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Just get a pickup truck and haul the sled in its bed...it stays high and dry, and you don't have to worry about a trailer.
 

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I seen a guy unloading a sled from the back of an extended full size van. Just an idea...
 

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For me the enclosed hybrid trailer was worth the extra $$$, It's an easy tow being only 600# empty, tad over 1200# with my fueled touring sled, therefor no need for a big truck. Could not be easier to load and unload, spring assisted beaver tail ramp/door. Sled stays clean and secure and it is a dedicated storage unit for the sled year round.
 

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Get a small utility trailer big enough to fit the snowmobile, then make 4 foot wood sides and a angled front piece. Put a cover on it, and it should stay clean. Then you can use the trailer for other things in the summer. Trailers always come on handy.
 

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Get a small utility trailer big enough to fit the snowmobile, then make 4 foot wood sides and a angled front piece. Put a cover on it, and it should stay clean. Then you can use the trailer for other things in the summer. Trailers always come on handy.
Basically what i did when i still owned my impala back in the 70's. Converted a small utility trailer to haul the sled in the winter and bikes in the summer. Was a pita for me storing the trailer when not in use. Didn't have much room to park it.
 

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https://www.hardcoresledder.com/forums/626-snowmobile-trailers-haulers/1839712-whiteout-project.html

check out that thread in here for the ultimate 1 place enclosed trailer haha.
Yep, exactly, I was going to link that as well. If I wanted the ultimate 1 place trailer, that is exactly what I would build.

However, I am a single guy, and now only have one sled, and I love all the space my 14' inline gives me. In fact, if I were to do it again I would probably buy an 18', but I haul ice fishing gear and all that nonsense in there.
 

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I have aftermarket covers for both of my older sleds and will not haul them without covers. They don't flop in the wind, very secure.

One time last winter I ended up trailering both sleds a short distance. Because it was short, I didn't bother to cover them, and that was a big mistake. Slop from the road covered the sleds by the time we got to the trail head. Worse, it found its way under the hood. Lots of new rust started on the steel parts under hood because of that, and I won't let it happen again.

Unless you end up using a covered trailer, make sure your sled is covered.

The covers are Parts Unlimited "Custom Fit" that I bought from Dennis Kirk and are well made. I didn't expect them to be as good as they are, especially for the price.
 

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There is nothing wrong with throwing it in the back of a truck bed with a cover on either if money is a concern. Most fitted covers have no issues being on the road. That is what they are for. Plus they stay cleaner than a open sled trailer unless they have the front hood on the trailer.
 

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Get a small utility trailer big enough to fit the snowmobile, then make 4 foot wood sides and a angled front piece. Put a cover on it, and it should stay clean. Then you can use the trailer for other things in the summer. Trailers always come on handy.
it will do the job, but be far from user friendly
the main reason, LOW ceiling, if you only do short sides, if you start to do a full on build, like a REAL enclosed trailer, you start getting very heavy using wood as wall material, as you will need to be using treated wood or , it will come apart in a few yrs on you or less, as ply wood ain';t made to get wet over and over!, so end up needing to skin it to save it(added costs)
trying to make a good angled front ain't the easiest either, you end up[ wasting some trailer space pending design, and can effect tongue weight doing so!

if flat, its like pulling a kite!
several buddies when down this road, and ended up NOT happy in the end, wasted a lot of time and money, and THEN ended up buying a real sled trailer, with tie downs and NOT banging there heads crawling up under things

better than nothing maybe, but IMO< not worth the time and costs for the end result!
cheaper to buy a GOOD cover and stick in back of truck as OP is thinking!
 

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I've done it all, sled in the back of the truck, open trailer with salt shield and a cover, and an enclosed trailer. And an enclosed trailer by far is the way to go. And some enclosed trailers don't cost more than a good open trailer plus the cost of a salt shield and good cover.

Not only will an enclosed trailer protect your sled best (and you won't have to deal with some salty, frozen cover), it also offers security and can offer year round storage, you will find yourself using it year round for so many other things. I use mine year round for hauling dirt bikes, ATVs, camping, hauling furniture, hauling lawn mowers, etc.

If you end up going with an enclosed trailer, my suggestion is to get one with an aluminum frame (road salt can destroy a steel framed trailer rather quickly) and a rear ramp door.

Good luck!
 

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I had a Polaris that I rode for over 15k miles and I had no garage and an open trailer. For the life of that sled I bought 4 covers because they don't last. They get sun damaged and tear, total pain in the ass. Between the open trailer and the covers I bought I could have bought a decent enclosed. i hope now I never buy another cover as long as I live.

The natural progression of snowmobiling is going to lead you to an enclosed trailer at some point. I went from open 10' one place, to a 10' enclosed clamshell, to a small enclosed cargo trailer to finally my 14' inline. If I were smart I would have just bought a decent inline right off.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Thank guys for the excellent replies. This helps alot.

Just curious how wide are inline trailers? looks like most are 7' wide. Is that the standard?
 

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I had a Polaris that I rode for over 15k miles and I had no garage and an open trailer. For the life of that sled I bought 4 covers because they don't last. They get sun damaged and tear, total pain in the ass. Between the open trailer and the covers I bought I could have bought a decent enclosed. i hope now I never buy another cover as long as I live.

The natural progression of snowmobiling is going to lead you to an enclosed trailer at some point. I went from open 10' one place, to a 10' enclosed clamshell, to a small enclosed cargo trailer to finally my 14' inline. If I were smart I would have just bought a decent inline right off.
I did the same back in the 70's my sleds sat covered outside in the yard. I was able to get the dealer to throw in a cover, plus a bought a water treated heavy canvas tarp to put over that. They didn't even have enclosed trailers back then.
 
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