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Unfortunately its pretty cost prohibitive to do anything after the house is built.
Can you tell if they used any waterproofing at all? Around here most basements just get a coat of black asphalt damp proofing swabbed on, no capillary break between the footer and the wall, or slab, no waterproofing. Sometimes you get lucky and have a dry basement, most of the time you have the typical musty cellar.
 
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Discussion Starter #22
Just curious how long you have owned this unit?
Its the second repair in 4 years almost to the day. First time the thermostat on the control board crapped out which they gave me a new one in warranty i changed out. Now the compressor failed 2 years later. I'm not a havoc tech or i'd replace the compressor. You can't even get anyone close by to service this pos once they hear what you have. Company that sold originally is now seeing another make...much higher end and more reliable i've been told. They even admitted they had too many failures .
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Unfortunately its pretty cost prohibitive to do anything after the house is built.
Can you tell if they used any waterproofing at all? Around here most basements just get a coat of black asphalt damp proofing swabbed on, no capillary break between the footer and the wall, or slab, no waterproofing. Sometimes you get lucky and have a dry basement, most of the time you have the typical musty cellar.
The outside concrete was done with that black tar stuff plus the insides appear to have that dry lock stuff painted on the walls. Basement is totally sealed in a thick plastic wrap much like a rubber roof. Any gaps near the windows are foamed. Its done well just very humid in there. Like already said,,,,its very common all the folks living on right off the lake have the same issue. The newer homes or just built are doing much better. Ours was built in the 70's.
 

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Were just off a lake front and have a sump pump in that crawlspace of a basement that discharges water about every 15 minutes during the more rainy parts of the year. Its common around this lake nearly everyone i've spoke with have the same issues, and from what i gather were just about average. The basement floor, walls, and windows are foamed and sealed by professionals.
Well there is your water source..

How deep is your sump and the pump? If its at grade in your basement you are wasting effort with dehumidifier/s. They’ll never get you dry enough. (below 40% RH to limit mold growth)

Dig in a sump basin 4’ below footer level and install the sump pumps lower. (4’ min below footer elevation) Center it up in your crawlspace. In a pinch a 55 gallon poly drum with holes would work for the basin. Hand dig that basin into crawl space floor and install sump pump/s with float switch. You must drop water levels below your house before you engage the dehumidifier. If you are sealed on perimeter that is not likely a problem. Route water discharge to a location that won’t simply loop back into crawlspace. Discharge water to storm drain or connect to waste line if local code allows. You need that bulk water GONE. Move the water a long way from your house so your crawlspace will drain the bulk water well below the crawlspace floor grade.

Then get your dehumidifier dialed in.
 

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Also its seemingly obvious but don’t overlook your roof or rain gutters and discharge locations. When I bought my lake house it had steel roofing on it. I thought great! Then a year later I inspected attic and found 30 plus drips from the steel screws holding down panels. The sun expanded the panels and popped 25% of the screws out. Other locations I noticed the seal washers on screws UV’d out and cracked off. Water was dripping down walls ending up in crawlspace making more water problems.
I had all that sh!t ripped off and went back to good ole 50 year shingles like grandpa used.

No gutters means roof rain water ends up in your crawlspace or basement..
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Well there is your water source..

How deep is your sump and the pump? If its at grade in your basement you are wasting effort with dehumidifier/s. They’ll never get you dry enough. (below 40% RH to limit mold growth)

Dig in a sump basin 4’ below footer level and install the sump pumps lower. (4’ min below footer elevation) Center it up in your crawlspace. In a pinch a 55 gallon poly drum with holes would work for the basin. Hand dig that basin into crawl space floor and install sump pump/s with float switch. You must drop water levels below your house before you engage the dehumidifier. If you are sealed on perimeter that is not likely a problem. Route water discharge to a location that won’t simply loop back into crawlspace. Discharge water to storm drain or connect to waste line if local code allows. You need that bulk water GONE. Move the water a long way from your house so your crawlspace will drain the bulk water well below the crawlspace floor grade.

Then get your dehumidifier dialed in.
I don't know what your getting at but the sump pump system was already done by the same well known professional company that put in the dehumidifier. Its been all sealed only thing coming out of the basin is the 2'' outlet hose , the electrical cord, and alarm/backup system. The system works great as long as their components function like they should. Its that dam shitbox dehumidifier thats not reliable. Sump pumps been working great for years. In fact we have a service contract on it that it gets cleaned out, and looked over every 2 years. The same company didn't offer one on the dehumidifier which should of sent off a red flag.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Also its seemingly obvious but don’t overlook your roof or rain gutters and discharge locations. When I bought my lake house it had steel roofing on it. I thought great! Then a year later I inspected attic and found 30 plus drips from the steel screws holding down panels. The sun expanded the panels and popped 25% of the screws out. Other locations I noticed the seal washers on screws UV’d out and cracked off. Water was dripping down walls ending up in crawlspace making more water problems.
I had all that sh!t ripped off and went back to good ole 50 year shingles like grandpa used.

No gutters means roof rain water ends up in your crawlspace or basement..
New roof/gutters were done at the time of the house remodel. I dug the trench for the sump pump discharge. Thats no problem works fine. The yard has been graded from the foundation so any water from the gutters will drain away and not puddle up anywhere nearby.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Forgot to add some of the new homes were built on higher ground or a hill to avoid this issue as much as possible. Homes in my immediate area are all on low ground just a few feet above the lakes surface. Its not cost effective to raise this home...you'd have to be retarded to even think so.
 

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I don't think its the slope a house if built on so much as the tech of NOW as to yrs back when designing draining about a foundation, my parents house is built on a pretty steep slope, and nearest water is about a mile away or more, house sits facing the sun, has sun all day long in the front, and shade half the day in the back
and there basement is a moisture magnet
they run 4 dehumidifiers all yr, and suck countless gallons a day out of the basement

when they were younger, they never really had as much of an issue, but as the house has aged, maybe weaker cement floors, cinder block walls?? and them being less active, and stay mainly up stairs, the basement has gotten worse each passing yr!

there right now trying to find some better option that what there doing and have yet to find anything better!

older building design's I don;t think, had the info they do today nor the options to TRY and keep water/dampness out
even when you RE dig around foundations and TRY and resolve, I don;t think its the same ever as newer but things, properly designed for conditions the build site is at!
many things just didn;t exist back yrs ago!

nature of the beast, I'm surprised more after market company's don';t have better options!, seems like a business could make some money if they had better options that worked better!
 

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Interesting to also talk about water getting into the house.
Our current home had poor grading and no gutters when we purchased seventeen years ago. The previous owner had a whopping five feet of hose outside for the discharge. I peeled back the sheetrock in the basement and found plenty of mold with water running down the walls. I also found that they had somewhat done the build correct with a interior footing/french drain. Water was getting to the drain fine. The moisture levels were not. It took a lot of work to fix the mold and drainage.
I regraded the property, and added french drains around the house. Those run into a dedicated drain line that drains to daylight below the property. I also put surface drains into hard surfaces like patios around the house. I added gutters. The downspouts run into pvc that also does the surface drains. Sump discharge is also tied to that pvc line. The pvc terminates with a daylight drain about 150' down hill from the house. You should see the water flow out of that pipe in a good storm. :)
I busted my ass on all that work on the outside. I also surface sealed the inside foundation walls. I put 2" XPS on the interior foundation walls. I gap sealed all the joints with spray foam. I also epoxy coated all the floors.(Not the perfect solution, but anything helps). My main goal was preventing water and hopefully moisture from getting into the house.
I've seen what water does to the inside of a house. Moisture, aka high humidity, just takes a little longer.
I honestly don't understand why we don't build our homes better. There is no need to let outside water inside a home.
 

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Interesting to also talk about water getting into the house.
Our current home had poor grading and no gutters when we purchased seventeen years ago. The previous owner had a whopping five feet of hose outside for the discharge. I peeled back the sheetrock in the basement and found plenty of mold with water running down the walls. I also found that they had somewhat done the build correct with a interior footing/french drain. Water was getting to the drain fine. The moisture levels were not. It took a lot of work to fix the mold and drainage.
I regraded the property, and added french drains around the house. Those run into a dedicated drain line that drains to daylight below the property. I also put surface drains into hard surfaces like patios around the house. I added gutters. The downspouts run into pvc that also does the surface drains. Sump discharge is also tied to that pvc line. The pvc terminates with a daylight drain about 150' down hill from the house. You should see the water flow out of that pipe in a good storm. :)
I busted my ass on all that work on the outside. I also surface sealed the inside foundation walls. I put 2" XPS on the interior foundation walls. I gap sealed all the joints with spray foam. I also epoxy coated all the floors.(Not the perfect solution, but anything helps). My main goal was preventing water and hopefully moisture from getting into the house.
I've seen what water does to the inside of a house. Moisture, aka high humidity, just takes a little longer.
I honestly don't understand why we don't build our homes better. There is no need to let outside water inside a home.
Nice work
 

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If you set your box (house) in a pool of water, then blow a hair dryer on the basement floor.. It will never dry.. ever! Even 10 hairdryers won’t fix it. You gotta remove the bulk water first from its source. Then dry the air. Otherwise your dehumidifier will run 100% of the time until failure.

If water table is rising below house (watch lake level) that can be a big problem. The only way to fix this is to place pumps 4’ minimum below the footer elevation to drop the water table directly below your house. Think deep floor drain with big pump draining the pool below house. Then dry the air..

Of course you can’t easily pick the house up.. you have to pump the water table down.
 

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If you want to test.. fill the bath tub with water. get a cardboard box. open lid and set in water. Now blow your hair dryer in the box and dry it out.

Good luck..

Burn up a couple of those PoS Chinese hairdryers. Ha Ha


Now let 3” of water out of the tub drain so there is a nice gap below cardboard box. Try the hairdryer again..

 

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A couple pics of my house.

House is very close to lake. Lower level has 3-5’ crawlspace. So crawlspace floor is very close to water table elevation.




Inside crawlspace



Megadry CS70, now runs about 25% of the time. I mounted on pedestal to minimize noise.

 

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Discussion Starter #36
I don't think its the slope a house if built on so much as the tech of NOW as to yrs back when designing draining about a foundation, my parents house is built on a pretty steep slope, and nearest water is about a mile away or more, house sits facing the sun, has sun all day long in the front, and shade half the day in the back
and there basement is a moisture magnet
they run 4 dehumidifiers all yr, and suck countless gallons a day out of the basement

when they were younger, they never really had as much of an issue, but as the house has aged, maybe weaker cement floors, cinder block walls?? and them being less active, and stay mainly up stairs, the basement has gotten worse each passing yr!

there right now trying to find some better option that what there doing and have yet to find anything better!

older building design's I don;t think, had the info they do today nor the options to TRY and keep water/dampness out
even when you RE dig around foundations and TRY and resolve, I don;t think its the same ever as newer but things, properly designed for conditions the build site is at!
many things just didn;t exist back yrs ago!

nature of the beast, I'm surprised more after market company's don';t have better options!, seems like a business could make some money if they had better options that worked better!
Its all the same with these basement companies how they deal with dampness...the only minor differences is what brands they use. Its all tackled in the same way.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Its all the same with these basement companies how they deal with dampness...the only minor differences is what brands they use. Its all tackled in the same way.
Your house is at least twice as high off the lake as mine. If i tried to do what your saying i'd be pumping the lake out 24/7 needing round the clock large sump pumps.
 

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Your house is at least twice as high off the lake as mine. If i tried to do what your saying i'd be pumping the lake out 24/7 needing round the clock large sump pumps.
Then you just answered your own question.. A dehumidifier of any size won’t fix your problem. Get big pumps installed and quit messing around.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Then you just answered your own question.. A dehumidifier of any size won’t fix your problem. Get big pumps installed and quit messing around.
Well, thats your assessment. Before the house was remolded the previous family lived there for 30 some years years using 2 smaller basement dehumidifiers that did the job along with a crude sump pump system. Now that the house is tighter we have more humidity inside. I still contend this particular dehumidifier is the issue. When we get it back, and once it should crap out again i'll buy something else. I can't believe these dehumidifiers should only last this long....its not even set anywhere near if maximum....about a shade past 1/2 way.
 

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If it was well done, you wouldn't be having any problems.
The walls can be somwhat fixed by excavating to the footers, and using actual waterproofing materials. Its still impossible to stop the water from soaking into the footer and rising up into the wall though.
You're kind of screwed on the floor, without putting down dimple mat, a water proof layer, and pouring a couple inch slab on top
 
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