Hardcore Sledder banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2017 ZR 7000 and a 2019 ZR 8000. Both have Fox QS3 shocks. Two upfront and one in the skid. I watched this video on YT:
and the guy says if the clicker can be rotated freely without feeling the positive click in the three positions then there is low pressure in the reservoir. On my 2017 skid QS3 shock it rotates freely like that with no strong click.

Now I'm concerned that all my shocks should be rebuilt. I'me wondering is this a hard thing to do? Do the shocks need to be removed from the machine to be rebuilt? Are there any shortcuts that would get me through the 2020/2021 season without having to take all my suspension apart? How bad would it be if I just sent it without doing anything until next summer?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,002 Posts
Yes, the shock would certainly need to be removed to be rebuilt you can not do it in the chassis.

I have the same issue with my 2017 XF 9000. The rear skid shock turns easily with no detent Detected between 1,2 or 3.

Remove the rear skid from the sled and remove the rear shock and send to a qualified Fox QS3 rebuild Tech.

Jeff B In Maine

Sent via my US Cellular rotary dial device.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,862 Posts
I have seen the knob break internally. Verify first that it is not just a stripped plastic knob.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
803 Posts
Personally, if they're both in factory form and have never been rebuilt and if they have over 1,000 miles on them, I'd pull all 4 off both machines and have them all rebuilt. At the very least, have the oil changed and if any of the seals are flattened, have them replaced too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,862 Posts
I think 1,000 miles is plenty early from normal riding. I often put that on in a good week. I'd never get a break with that service interval.
We've seen some last for an amazingly high number of miles. I ride with a group that is hard on suspensions too. The TS sleds were a game changer for durability and the Procross sleds are right up there with shocks and suspension components. Seems like the front skid arm is the first to go if something is going to fail. Watch that shock and the arm assembly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,002 Posts
I think 1,000 miles is plenty early from normal riding. I often put that on in a good week. I'd never get a break with that service interval.
We've seen some last for an amazingly high number of miles. I ride with a group that is hard on suspensions too. The TS sleds were a game changer for durability and the Procross sleds are right up there with shocks and suspension components. Seems like the front skid arm is the first to go if something is going to fail. Watch that shock and the arm assembly.
Great advice right here.

However, if there aren't Amy detents in the rear shock between positions 1,2 or 3 that ones pouched.
Time to rebuild for sure.


Jeff B In Maine

Sent via my US Cellular rotary dial device.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
I have a 2017 ZR 7000 and a 2019 ZR 8000. Both have Fox QS3 shocks. Two upfront and one in the skid. I watched this video on YT:
and the guy says if the clicker can be rotated freely without feeling the positive click in the three positions then there is low pressure in the reservoir. On my 2017 skid QS3 shock it rotates freely like that with no strong click.

Now I'm concerned that all my shocks should be rebuilt. I'me wondering is this a hard thing to do? Do the shocks need to be removed from the machine to be rebuilt? Are there any shortcuts that would get me through the 2020/2021 season without having to take all my suspension apart? How bad would it be if I just sent it without doing anything until next summer?
I have a shock rebuilding business so I've seen your situation many times before. The Fox QS3 is an AWESOME shock but it does have an issue with leaking nitrogen through the needle port in the reservoir head. There are update kits available through many suppliers or a shock service can simply insert a new rubber into the needle port. If the sleds are low miles you can simply repressure the shock to 200 psi with nitrogen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,002 Posts
I have a shock rebuilding business so I've seen your situation many times before. The Fox QS3 is an AWESOME shock but it does have an issue with leaking nitrogen through the needle port in the reservoir head. There are update kits available through many suppliers or a shock service can simply insert a new rubber into the needle port. If the sleds are low miles you can simply repressure the shock to 200 psi with nitrogen.
Thanks for the info.
My rear shock when inverted leaks oil.
Seal I"m sure along with a nitrogen recharge Im sure.

What would that run?

Jeff B In Maine

Sent via my US Cellular rotary dial device.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
Thanks for the info.
My rear shock when inverted leaks oil.
Seal I"m sure along with a nitrogen recharge Im sure.

What would that run?

Jeff B In Maine

Sent via my US Cellular rotary dial device.
Standard rebuild for hydraulic shocks includes thorough internal cleaning and inspection, replace IFP "O" ring, fresh Amsoil Shock Therapy oil, pressurize shock with nitrogen, cycle shock on stroke machine and leak check. Standard shocks are $25 and reservoir shocks are $35. These prices do not include shipping to and from my shop in Wisconsin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
So to remove the shocks from the procross chassis can I just loosen the nuts and take the bolts out on either end and they will come out?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
803 Posts
So to remove the shocks from the procross chassis can I just loosen the nuts and take the bolts out on either end and they will come out?
Yep, pretty much. Pop a milk crate under the front or use a sled lift and pull them off.

Take some pics beforehand and you won’t doubt yourself when reinstalling them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,664 Posts
I had all 4 of mine rebuilt for the first time on my 2017 XF Cross Country @ 6800 miles. The front skid isn't a QS3, but i had him valve it just a bit stiffer.
The skis are easy. The skid needs removed. It really sucks how much you have to remove to get the rear shocks out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Thanks this is what I was afraid of. What a PITA. Good to know they can go that many miles without any major damage though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Standard rebuild for hydraulic shocks includes thorough internal cleaning and inspection, replace IFP "O" ring, fresh Amsoil Shock Therapy oil, pressurize shock with nitrogen, cycle shock on stroke machine and leak check. Standard shocks are $25 and reservoir shocks are $35. These prices do not include shipping to and from my shop in Wisconsin.
Where are you in Wisconsin?
I'm in the Oconomowoc area.
I have 4 or 6 regular non QS3 I want rebuilt.
Do you do revalving?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
803 Posts
I've talked to Ingram in the past. Seems like a pretty straightforward guy. I think he was even at the Milwaukee show last year.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top