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2012 Polaris Assault 800
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I installed Indy Specialties bronze bushings in the rear suspension front torque arm. The factory plastic bushings just didn't sit well with me. They fit perfect in the tube and the bushing that goes inside. Machined exact. Also put on a second limit strap, heavy duty front limit strap shaft, fourth wheel kit, billet spring blocks, polished the aluminum and ceramic coated the new rails (under warranty for flaking). Checked all bearings and added grease to all. Painted the driveshaft too.....dam thing is bare steel and already rusted with 400 miles on it. LOL
 

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From my product development engineer perspective, the plastic bushings, in a skid application, are actually the right choice. Bronze will last longer, as long as you grease regularly, but most guys don't do that. Here's an excerpt from Igus, as an example comparing their plastic bushings to oil impregnated, so you don't think I'm just crazy:

"Oil-impregnated bronze bearings rely on a capillary action to create a lubricating oil film. High speed and rotational motion are both required to draw the oil out and maintain a full film of lubricant. Shaft oscillation, slow speed and intermittent use can all inhibit this process.

If movement stops, the oil on the surface of the bearing dries up. This can lead to squeaking and an increase in the coefficient of friction. High temperatures can also break down the oil. Other disadvantages include low chemical resistance and sensitivity to dirt, edge pressure and impacts."
 

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we tested brass, oil lite, and our gar-dur UHMW plastic bushings at the iron dog race in Alaska. a couple years ago. the brass and oil lite failed badly. broke, cracked and just plain wore out. we have a machine shop in my town that has MILLITARY and NASA contracts. we asked a NASA engineer about what would work the best in this application. this is what led us to the UHMW plastic we sell. we have customer's with over 10,000 miles on there sleds and these bushing are still like new. we have full IGX rear suspension bushing, pro-ride rear bushings, front a-arm bushings for pro-ride, ayxs, and matrix chassis sleds, W.E. shock eye bushing's etc. do it right do it once.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
From my product development engineer perspective, the plastic bushings, in a skid application, are actually the right choice. Bronze will last longer, as long as you grease regularly, but most guys don't do that. Here's an excerpt from Igus, as an example comparing their plastic bushings to oil impregnated, so you don't think I'm just crazy:

"Oil-impregnated bronze bearings rely on a capillary action to create a lubricating oil film. High speed and rotational motion are both required to draw the oil out and maintain a full film of lubricant. Shaft oscillation, slow speed and intermittent use can all inhibit this process.

If movement stops, the oil on the surface of the bearing dries up. This can lead to squeaking and an increase in the coefficient of friction. High temperatures can also break down the oil. Other disadvantages include low chemical resistance and sensitivity to dirt, edge pressure and impacts."
Well I agree to disagree with some of Igus' findings. First, oil does not dry up. It may weep out, but it will not evaporate. It also contradicts itself.....It states High speed and rotational motion are required to draw out the oil....but if you stop and then start after some time the oil will not be drawn back out? I agree with getting dirt and contaminates in between will hurt it, but temperature is not an issue and the suspension is always in motion when riding.
 

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2012 Polaris Assault 800
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
we tested brass, oil lite, and our gar-dur UHMW plastic bushings at the iron dog race in Alaska. a couple years ago. the brass and oil lite failed badly. broke, cracked and just plain wore out. we have a machine shop in my town that has MILLITARY and NASA contracts. we asked a NASA engineer about what would work the best in this application. this is what led us to the UHMW plastic we sell. we have customer's with over 10,000 miles on there sleds and these bushing are still like new. we have full IGX rear suspension bushing, pro-ride rear bushings, front a-arm bushings for pro-ride, ayxs, and matrix chassis sleds, W.E. shock eye bushing's etc. do it right do it once.
Rick, any idea what the factory plastic bushings are made of.....Also, I did look on your website but only saw A arm bushings available, nothing for the rear suspension front torque arm for the Axys/Matryx. If you have them, can you post them and the price. Thanks.
 

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2021 XCR Switchback 850
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Well I agree to disagree with some of Igus' findings. First, oil does not dry up. It may weep out, but it will not evaporate. It also contradicts itself.....It states High speed and rotational motion are required to draw out the oil....but if you stop and then start after some time the oil will not be drawn back out? I agree with getting dirt and contaminates in between will hurt it, but temperature is not an issue and the suspension is always in motion when riding.
And anyone who leaves the suspension in the sled for 10k miles has more issues than these bushings. My suspension comes out about every 2000-2500 miles and every thing gets gone through. The brass bushings have worked well for me, and I grease them every time I go through the sled.
 

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I can tell you right now the IS bushings are not oil impregnated. You will need to grease and regressed over its life.
 

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I drilled pin holes in all the pivot points on my suspension and have been doing this since Polaris quit putting fittings in the suspension. I use a grease gun like the ones for greasing the bar on chainsaws. I believe it not only makes my suspension bushings last for ever but it also makes suspension work better and more consistently. I have a prox2 800 with over 22,000 miles on it and all original bushings. The bushings in that sled are brass.
 

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I drilled pin holes in all the pivot points on my suspension and have been doing this since Polaris quit putting fittings in the suspension. I use a grease gun like the ones for greasing the bar on chainsaws. I believe it not only makes my suspension bushings last for ever but it also makes suspension work better and more consistently. I have a prox2 800 with over 22,000 miles on it and all original bushings. The bushings in that sled are brass.
I like the pinhole idea. I have the same grease gun for my saw tip.
 

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Rick, any idea what the factory plastic bushings are made of.....Also, I did look on your website but only saw A arm bushings available, nothing for the rear suspension front torque arm for the Axys/Matryx. If you have them, can you post them and the price. Thanks.
injection molded delrin. cheapest plastic there is.
 

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I drilled pin holes in all the pivot points on my suspension and have been doing this since Polaris quit putting fittings in the suspension. I use a grease gun like the ones for greasing the bar on chainsaws. I believe it not only makes my suspension bushings last for ever but it also makes suspension work better and more consistently. I have a prox2 800 with over 22,000 miles on it and all original bushings. The bushings in that sled are brass.
pro-x 2 much thicker bushing's then what the axys front a-arm are. big difference. compare apples to apples.
 

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pro-x 2 much thicker bushing's then what the axys front a-arm are. big difference. compare apples to apples.
I wasn’t comparing them simply stating that I have never had to replace and of my bushings starting back with prox2. My axys and matryx are holding up and also don’t show wear with 5000+ miles on the axys. Lube does wonders. My a-arm bushings have not been replaced yet either and the show minimal wear also.
 
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