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Discussion Starter #1
I've got a 2001 ZR600 EFI. Starting last year, the rear end didn't seem to come all the way back up after I get off the sled (1-2 inches), and even when I lift it back up it would sometimes sag again. Dealer has checked it out twice, and found no problems with any suspension or shock (ACT) components. I'm not sure what to do. I'm a pretty big guy at 6'1", 235 lbs, and was wondering if anyone thinks the heavier springs in the rear would help.

Sled seems to ride perfect, and haven't had any problems with it yet.

Thanks for any input.

Brian
 

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I think suspension systems are designed to have a certain amount of sag(obviously). My brand new ZL sags a couple inches just under it's own weight. Of course it sags more when I sit on it. Think about it. When you're riding down a smooth trail and come to a ditch type bump, you want the suspension to fall into it, and the seat to stay level. On my dirt motorcycles, the suspension setup always called for a couple inches of sag with no rider on the seat.
 

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I have the same sled. Here is what I have to offer.

1) Get your shocks re-built and recharged

2) Get a coupling kit for the sled.

3) Tighten front skid shock

4) Leave the stock springs

I weigh more than you by a good amount :blink: and I thought the ride was the best, with stock valving, springs and a coupling kit on that sled.
 

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the torque sensing link might be the sagging problem but most cats and polaris with the link have a certain amount of sag it has too because when you liftoff over jumps the whole suspension drops out and gets ready for touch down at that point upon landing if everything goes as planned you should not bottom if you do shocks are too soft and should be recalibrated for your weight maybe springs too they say the stock zr,s and all zl ,s came setup soft from arcticat snotech mag does a good report on the zr,s good luck thunderbird
 

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my two cents?!?!

Get bigger springs

I went up two spring sizes, I can't remember the part #'s or spring diameter (.460??), but it was two sizes up in the AC performance manual table. I can find the part #'s if you would like. I am quite satisfied with the results.
I am 215 lbs, instead of bottoming out 50 times on a ride, I bottom out maybe once per ride on the big hits that make my buddies cry about back pain.
The rear end doesn't get that 3" droop it used to get after bashing bumps for an hour.
If you are mechanically inclined, they are easy to change.

I have been personalizing my 2001 zr 600 carb and I am almost at 5000 miles with it.
After 3 years i finally have the suspension where I want it for me.
Rebuild your shocks every year or sooner!
Check your valve cables, every 1000 miles, mine keep getting out of adjustment.
 

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I have the same problem on my '98 ZRT. We've changed the springs to AC's big boy springs and had no real effect on the rear suspension returning to full upright travel after sitting on. Had to get off and pull it back up, but it at least this time it stayed upright and didn't sag again. As far as I understand this, and have been told by a number of long time sledders, the springs are there to aid in absorbing the bumps and ridges, in conjunction with the shock, while riding. Installing the big boy springs provides that addtional pre-load to counteract your weight on the suspension in trying to keep it from bottoming out as often and provide you with a better ride. That is primary effect with the bigger springs. But, I find it hard to believe that the suspension is "suppose" to have some sag or designed sag in it. My bud has a 95' ZR700 sittin' right next to mine and when I sit on his and get off it pops right backup to full extension. He also has a brand new '03 F7 sno-pro and when I sit on it, it barely budges and when getting off, it returns to full extension.

Also, I have changed the front skid shock's spring and tightened it. I am now in the process of replacing the rear shock, since it is OEM and five years old (I have had many good suggestions from this forum as to which shock I should replace with. I'll let you know which one I use and how it works out) and I'm going to install taller spring slide blocks to increase the preload even further (I'm bigger than you). Then I'll just have to tweak the adjustment settings to get it to my ride style. The coupler block suspension upgrade has also sparked my interest and I am now researching that as an option, if none of the above resolves the issue to my liking. Good luck.
 

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The bigboy springs for 200+ pounders are part # 1604-194 and 1604-195.
I'm 285# so I went with a superbigboy set-up 1604-224 and 1604-225 which require 5" be cut from the long leg of the spring. Both sets have the same .460" wire size however the 224/225 set have an 83 degree leg angle compared to 90 degree angle of the 194/194 springs. The 83 degree angle gives more initial spring preload.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Originally posted by Jay@Dec 13 2002, 03:52 PM
I have the same sled. Here is what I have to offer.

1) Get your shocks re-built and recharged

2) Get a coupling kit for the sled.

3) Tighten front skid shock

4) Leave the stock springs

I weigh more than you by a good amount :blink: and I thought the ride was the best, with stock valving, springs and a coupling kit on that sled.
Jay,

Thanks for the input. I was thinking along the same lines. One of my older sleds was a ZR440 that I put the big boy springs in and new Fox shock, and it really didn't make any difference. I asked my dealer about rebuilding the rear shock in the 600 and he didn't think it needed it (I may do it anyway). What kind of effect will the coupling kit have?

Brian
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Originally posted by BigD800ZRT@Dec 14 2002, 12:53 PM
I have the same problem on my '98 ZRT. We've changed the springs to AC's big boy springs and had no real effect on the rear suspension returning to full upright travel after sitting on. Had to get off and pull it back up, but it at least this time it stayed upright and didn't sag again. As far as I understand this, and have been told by a number of long time sledders, the springs are there to aid in absorbing the bumps and ridges, in conjunction with the shock, while riding. Installing the big boy springs provides that addtional pre-load to counteract your weight on the suspension in trying to keep it from bottoming out as often and provide you with a better ride. That is primary effect with the bigger springs. But, I find it hard to believe that the suspension is "suppose" to have some sag or designed sag in it. My bud has a 95' ZR700 sittin' right next to mine and when I sit on his and get off it pops right backup to full extension. He also has a brand new '03 F7 sno-pro and when I sit on it, it barely budges and when getting off, it returns to full extension.

Also, I have changed the front skid shock's spring and tightened it. I am now in the process of replacing the rear shock, since it is OEM and five years old (I have had many good suggestions from this forum as to which shock I should replace with. I'll let you know which one I use and how it works out) and I'm going to install taller spring slide blocks to increase the preload even further (I'm bigger than you). Then I'll just have to tweak the adjustment settings to get it to my ride style. The coupler block suspension upgrade has also sparked my interest and I am now researching that as an option, if none of the above resolves the issue to my liking. Good luck.
I'm glad that I'm not the only one with this issue. I've tried the same thing. Sit on my brothers ZR500, get off and it pops right back up, ditto with my fathers ZL 600. I also agree that the notion of "designed sag" sounds like nonsense. It makes it look like there is 11.5 inches of travel in the rear instead of 13.5, and that can't be right.
I may go in the direction of the coupler blocks as Jay suggested and see what change if any occurs.
 

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By adding a coupling kit, the front and rear shock will act as one in more circumstances, instead of two separate shocks. THe kickback in the rear will be reduced and the stutter bumps will all but disappear. The coupling kit will give you the feel of a stiffer suspension.
 

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:rolleyes: Keep in mind that when you use a coupler kit you say goodbye to weight transfer and hook up.
Seems like everythings a compramise doesn't it?
I just added 194/195 rear springs to my sled, they did little/nothing for the rear end sag but did eliminate bottoming. The ride is a little stiffer but not by much.
Rick.
 

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Originally posted by zr sled head@Dec 16 2002, 01:56 PM
:rolleyes: Keep in mind that when you use a coupler kit you say goodbye to weight transfer and hook up.
Seems like everythings a compramise doesn't it?
I disagree, just because its coupled doesn't mean that your not going to get any transfer and hookup. It may be less? but I don't believe that there is much different. If the skis are 6" or 2' off of the ground is the transfer different.?

Its the same thing that people say about the M-10 not transfering weight, well I tell you this, I got a ZR with an M-10 that hooks just fine.

For trail riding, go coupled, it will benefit you much more.
 
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