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The best setup is to take a 1.60 cobra and convert it to an Ice cobra by adding the ting lug studs with a tire studding tool. I did this to my 2018 and will do it to my 2020. Easy job, no drilling the track, hardly had extra weight and it gives you the bite you need in an icy corner or crossing a bare road.


With the screw ins on the outside lug....do you need tunnel protectors???


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When you learn to ride on short-track 70's sleds with cleats, a modern un-studded track is no problem. I've done more than one 360 on icy roads with absolutely no warning whatsoever.

If you're used to studs, I'd at least have studding as a backup option. You can always pre-drill the track now while it's warm and then stud this winter, saving you roughly half the time and less-frozen fingers.

Either stick with what you're used to, or understand that you'll have to learn to drive all over again. My experience with 140"+ tracks is that studs aren't really necessary. But, that's just me - I enjoy driving Mustangs in the winter.
Oh man that brings back memories of running completely out of control on cleats!Maybe that's why I always think the modern rubber tracks are more than enough without studs.I also don't like my sled feeling all glued down to the trail.
 

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The best setup is to take a 1.60 cobra and convert it to an Ice cobra by adding the ting lug studs with a tire studding tool. I did this to my 2018 and will do it to my 2020. Easy job, no drilling the track, hardly had extra weight and it gives you the bite you need in an icy corner or crossing a bare road.
Can you list the item # of the studs you used?

Thanks,
 

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The best setup is to take a 1.60 cobra and convert it to an Ice cobra by adding the ting lug studs with a tire studding tool. I did this to my 2018 and will do it to my 2020. Easy job, no drilling the track, hardly had extra weight and it gives you the bite you need in an icy corner or crossing a bare road.
You may want to check the heat exchanger in the top of tunnel in frt of tunnel guards on outside. I did same thing with my 18 and they hit. Just on outside bands.
 

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You may want to check the heat exchanger in the top of tunnel in frt of tunnel guards on outside. I did same thing with my 18 and they hit. Just on outside bands.


And you had tunnel guards on?


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You may want to check the heat exchanger in the top of tunnel in frt of tunnel guards on outside. I did same thing with my 18 and they hit. Just on outside bands.

Mine also on 19. Rub's way out side and in front of where guards would be. Running them in center is plenty for my needs.
 

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And you had tunnel guards on?


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No, and I tend to run my track on the loose side. The tunnel guards don’t go all the way to front of tunnel so last foot or so they wouldn’t cover anyway. I just pulled outside studs out and left inner ones in. I have no problems with ice or hard packed. Does it hook up like a studded sled? Absolutely not, but it is more fun for me and handles easier through the tight trails. Also stops really well too.
 

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Mine also on 19. Rub's way out side and in front of where guards would be. Running them in center is plenty for my needs.
Arvo17, you warned me of this last year and thanks for the heads up! Pulled them back out of my 19 assault before I even rode it.
 

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How does that pattern hook up? Is it listed on the Woody's template?
I dont think would be listed given its a pattern that repeats every 2nd window. The Assault equipped with a 144 has 57 windows and requires a pattern that repeats every 3 rows. Row 1 and 57 would match as if studded as shown. The dealer probably moved the studs in row 57 to the middle. I'll be studding my Assault this year and I'm considering a 2 per row, 114 total stud setup. I'm just trying to convince myself that 114 is enough. It's a significant amount of weight saved compared to 171(considering), or 228( not considering). If I go with 2 per row, what are everyone's opinion on a doublebacker per row vs two singles per row? Also what does everyone think about 114 studs total? Winter is almost here haha, I need to make up my mind.:bc:
 

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it really does matter where you ride and what the trails are like. i'm in ontario too, so a lot of road/icey trails/lake riding(we have a lot of water and our trails will take you over lakes). since i'm on georgian bay, there was no way i could/would do without studs. my hubby studded his new at the time assault last year, even before his first ride. both of ours have min studding, but considering our last ride last season. we ended up doing one of the trails that was 99% on georgian bay over 5 hours, with only small islands to break up the ice riding.

for us it's needed, for you maybe not.
 

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I dont think would be listed given its a pattern that repeats every 2nd window. The Assault equipped with a 144 has 57 windows and requires a pattern that repeats every 3 rows. Row 1 and 57 would match as if studded as shown. The dealer probably moved the studs in row 57 to the middle. I'll be studding my Assault this year and I'm considering a 2 per row, 114 total stud setup. I'm just trying to convince myself that 114 is enough. It's a significant amount of weight saved compared to 171(considering), or 228( not considering). If I go with 2 per row, what are everyone's opinion on a doublebacker per row vs two singles per row? Also what does everyone think about 114 studs total? Winter is almost here haha, I need to make up my mind.:bc:
hubby has the 114 on his, see my post above where we ride.
 

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hubby has the 114 on his, see my post above where we ride.
I've never used less than 144 and that was on my 121inch sleds in the 90s. I'm tempted to try 114, given that even with only two per row, there are at least 30 studs contacting the ground. Is your husband an aggressive rider? Did he bend or pull any studs through the track?
 

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I've never used less than 144 and that was on my 121inch sleds in the 90s. I'm tempted to try 114, given that even with only two per row, there are at least 30 studs contacting the ground. Is your husband an aggressive rider? Did he bend or pull any studs through the track?
he likes speed and is fairly aggressive, he was a slacker and had the dealer put them on.
 

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I dont think would be listed given its a pattern that repeats every 2nd window. The Assault equipped with a 144 has 57 windows and requires a pattern that repeats every 3 rows. Row 1 and 57 would match as if studded as shown. The dealer probably moved the studs in row 57 to the middle. I'll be studding my Assault this year and I'm considering a 2 per row, 114 total stud setup. I'm just trying to convince myself that 114 is enough. It's a significant amount of weight saved compared to 171(considering), or 228( not considering). If I go with 2 per row, what are everyone's opinion on a doublebacker per row vs two singles per row? Also what does everyone think about 114 studs total? Winter is almost here haha, I need to make up my mind.:bc:
I'd try 2 per row before jumping on loading it right up. Plenty of different ways to do it so anyone that tells you they have the best set up might just be that kind of guy that always thinks he has the best set up. "Annoying" I'd probably go with 57 Doubles for a 114 count for starters and see how you like it. If you then feel you need more you could creep up on it adding more. Remember, the more studs you add the more ski carbide you will need. Nothing worse than having lots of track grip and then pushing through the corners without enough steering control. There's gonna be a 100's of opinions when asking how should I stud my sled. I personally like lighter studded traction over being nailed down. There's advantages and disadvantages to EVERY set up out there. Finding what's best for you comes down to how you ride and the feel you like. :thumbsup:
If you don't get too confused with all the different opinions coming your way you can then ask what brand and size stud is best for another 100 answers. :bc:
 

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I used the igrip ST25R. Ordered the 150 quantity box and have left overs.


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I've used traditional Woody's push through studs and Stud Boyz as well. Tried both minimum penetration and deeper penetration studs. Plastic backers and aluminum. Different patterns and different amounts. This year I'm again trying something new to me.

I picked up a Back Country 1.75 track that I installed after last years riding season was over. I Installed 250 of the IGRIP ST25R studs. the track and studs look pretty awesome. I've never tried the IGRIP studs before but everything I've heard about them has been positive for the kind of traction that I'm expecting to see out of them. I did have an Ice Cobra once and I'd say the IGRIP ST25R studs have better penetration than what the stock Ice Cobra has. IGRIP also makes another stud that is slightly more aggressive than the ST25R. The ST25 has about 1/4" of penetration and their other more aggressive option has 3/8". My 250 igrip studs weighed a little more than 1 pound. :buttrock: I can't wait to try it. The waiting game SUCKS!!
 

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I'd try 2 per row before jumping on loading it right up. Plenty of different ways to do it so anyone that tells you they have the best set up might just be that kind of guy that always thinks he has the best set up. "Annoying" I'd probably go with 57 Doubles for a 114 count for starters and see how you like it. If you then feel you need more you could creep up on it adding more. Remember, the more studs you add the more ski carbide you will need. Nothing worse than having lots of track grip and then pushing through the corners without enough steering control. There's gonna be a 100's of opinions when asking how should I stud my sled. I personally like lighter studded traction over being nailed down. There's advantages and disadvantages to EVERY set up out there. Finding what's best for you comes down to how you ride and the feel you like. :thumbsup:
If you don't get too confused with all the different opinions coming your way you can then ask what brand and size stud is best for another 100 answers. :bc:
Thanks for the reply. I'm not really confused about anything, I'm pretty much decided that I'm going with 114. My Assault is the first sled I've riden for a season without studs(since 1990, haha), and i gotta say it hooks away better than I expected. I've studded many tracks and all of my tracks have had a minimum of 3 per row, which until now had been more than one stud per horsepower. My last track was 4 per, all in doubles. My only real concern is pull throughs and knock on wood I've never had one. I've bent and broke many though. I'm really just looking for feed back on pull throughs and whether doubles are better than two singles, given the low number studs. Thanks again, I appreciate the replies.:thumbsup:

Also, if I go singles, I might try out the performance stud stars. I remember turbojamie saying they iced up. Any thoughts on them? :bc:
 
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