Hardcore Sledder banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
4000 miles on my std F7 w/1 3/8" track. During a close inspection, I noticed while looking at the INSIDE of my track, that both OUTER rows of the INNER two rows of drive lugs, have many lugs that are "chunked-out" on what would be their back side -- the side opposite of the side that is contacted by the drive sprockets.

(See update to this post a few posts down)

It is possible that I did a small modification that contributed to and/or caused this problem. Quite a while back, I noticed the ice could build up under the tops of the limiter straps -- especially on a multi-day trip with no thawing -- and thus throw off the attitude of the suspension a bit. I installed zip ties to hold the tops of the limiter straps down to the cross shaft to help limit the ice and snow build-up under them, but this could've possibly made the straps flex further down and backwards than they would have otherwise.

If and when anyone else has a chance to check these lugs on your tracks, I'd appreciate it. Right now it's not bad enough that it's really hurting anything, but it can't be a good thing either, and if I'm the only one with this problem, that likely narrows it down to my little limiter strap zip tie mod. If others have this problem also, then POSSIBLY, just reversing the direction of the bottom limiter strap bolts will take care of this problem?!?!? Thanks! -- Roy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
820 Posts
Mine are not chunked but wore off on the inner side right where you discribed. There like scuffed off on the inner lug on the inner side , not the drive side but the inner side. I have looked and looked and cannot find where it could be catching, there is nothing there! But I will check those bolts , mine is a standard f7, I thought it might be from ice build up?
Mine does have 1500 miles on it ,,,maybe it will chunk out if I were to let it go to long?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,719 Posts
Roy,i just crawled around outside searching for some chunked out lugs and couldn't find any problems with my 1.375 tracks inner skin.I ve bottomed out many a time and have just under 2500 miles on mine,I didn't however use any zipties on the straps...you may be correct in thinking that the ziptie is causing the problems and forcing the bolt upwards into the backside of the drive lugs,sounds logical anyhow.I think I'd flip the bolt just because you can,its easy to and it may prevent future chunking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
I have the same problem with a 2003 zr 900.I can't seem to find what caused this to happen.
The lugs are damaged more on the left side of the track when you are sitting on it.I only have 500 miles on the sled.I am sure arctic cat will cover it but i want to fix what caused this to happen.Also two belts in 700 hundred miles.Both at top speeds and the second one cracked the belly pan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
This is an update to my original post above:

Took my track and skid out (to try the stock 1" track) and it looks like the problem is NOT the bottom limiter strap bolts, but rather the limiter straps themselves that are hitting, wearing, and chunking the track lugs I described in my original post above. When the limiters straps are flexed during front skid frame compression, it appears they are bowed forward and upward far enough to make contact with the lugs. Both of my limiter straps are worn quite badly on the tops, and also on the inside edges on the front of the straps. Apparantly the limiter strap material is tough enough to wear down and chunk the rubber track lugs after enough time, miles, and/or bumps.

Now that I've figured this out, here's a technical suspension question: My straps are in the stock middle holes, but it seems like the front skid shock is actually limiting the suspension fall-out before the straps are. In other words, I don't know if the straps in their current stock settings are doing diddly squat! IF this is indeed the case, can anyone think of a good reason why I shouldn't yank the lug eating straps and leave them out?? Will the shock alone be OK functioning as the limiter, as I think it currently is for the most part anyway??? -- Roy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,148 Posts
Without the limiter straps would that increase the load on the top of shock? I am wondering if you might pull the rod right out of the top of the skock if there is no limit to its outward movement. Witht the skid out of the sled are the straps tight?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Originally posted by 94ZR580@Mar 11 2003, 11:39 AM
Without the limiter straps would that increase the load on the top of shock? I am wondering if you might pull the rod right out of the top of the skock if there is no limit to its outward movement. With the skid out of the sled are the straps tight?
No, with the skid out the straps are NOT really very tight. They tighten up some, but it really feels like the front skid shock itself is the "limiter." Again, this is on my STANDARD F7 with the straps in their stock middle holes. I know for a fact that the shock becomes the limiter if you put the straps in the longest settings, but it seems it's that way with the stock middle holes as well. What's the "limiter" on the front ski shocks? There's no straps on those, so are the shocks themselves the limiters, or are limiters built into the design of the front suspension geometry? Seems I remember someone replying to a similar thread a while ago, and they stated that yes, of course the shock(s) can and do work as limiters. I guess I'd like to make sure the rod wouldn't pull right out of the top of the shock as you questioned, before I try removing my limiter straps! -- Roy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Anyone else inspect their inner track lugs or limiter straps yet, especially anyone with relatively high mileage??? -- Roy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Rob, or anyone else with higher mileage take a look at their lugs??? I promise not to bring it "TTT" anymore! -- Roy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Roy, sorry I didn't see this earlier.

I just looked again, and my inner lugs are in PERFECT condition, as are my limiter straps. Like new, honest, no wear at all.

But now that you mention it, I saw a skid out of a std suspension F7 at my dealer's last week that had the wear on the limiter straps that you describe. I didn't see the track, as this skid was pulled out (it was the one with the broken rails). But I believe the limiter straps were taut, and the shock was not the limiting factor in that suspension.

By any chance, you didn't move the position of your front arm, did you? There are 3 holes where you can change the front arm mounting location.. I briefly tried that back in december and quickly noted that it made the front arm shock bottom out and left slack in the limiter straps. Also, if you weren't aware, I believe the Snopro front arm shock has a longer travel than the standard.

If I were to guess, I'd say that in the case of the limiter straps wearing as you describe, the "slack" from the compressing suspension is deflected in the wrong direction. It could probably be fixed by offsetting the bottom mount slightly to the proper direction when the limiter straps are new, (if you can follow my thinking).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the detailed reply Rob.

Geeze, your inner lugs and straps are in perfect condition??? I suppose that's possible, especially seeing as how most (what percentage?) of the trails and riding you do are on pretty decent trails -- smooth and excellent to perfect?!

No, I didn't move my front arm mounting location, and yes, I figured the sno-pro must have a longer stroke front skid shock, as I believe they came with the limiters in the longest settings (top holes).

Thanks again for taking the time to check and for the reply. -- Roy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
OK guys, next time you're out in the garage, would you please take a close look to see which way your front limiter straps flex when the rear suspension is compressed -- do they flex upward/forward, or downward/rearward? Thanks! -- Roy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
I've generally had an open mind to Arctic Cat. However, I am starting to get the impression that perhaps the overall "quality" of the cats is questionable. I hear a lot of people who just love the "cats". Is it possible that Arctic Cat is just "throwing" these sleds together? Concentrating an quantity instead of quality? Forgetting about things such as "proper" alignment of clutches and drive axels?

Again, I keep an open mind to all brands, it's just that I've been hearing about more problems with the "Cats" than I was previously aware of since I joined this message board and find it a bit surprising considering how some people talk about the "Cats"...

Just an observation......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Originally posted by 97MACH1-Boneman@Nov 11 2003, 12:09 PM
I've generally had an open mind to Arctic Cat. However, I am starting to get the impression that perhaps the overall "quality" of the cats is questionable. I hear a lot of people who just love the "cats". Is it possible that Arctic Cat is just "throwing" these sleds together? Concentrating an quantity instead of quality? Forgetting about things such as "proper" alignment of clutches and drive axels?

Again, I keep an open mind to all brands, it's just that I've been hearing about more problems with the "Cats" than I was previously aware of since I joined this message board and find it a bit surprising considering how some people talk about the "Cats"...

Just an observation......
So... which way do your limiter straps flex? Please stick to the topic. Thank you. -- Roy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
The limiter straps perform several functions. If your sled pushes in the turns, :eek:oh4: tighten them up. If you do a lot a drag racing or powder riding, lengthen them to get rid of ski drag. If the sled pulls left or right under hard accelleration. tighten the strap it goes away from(i.e. tighten left strap if it pulls right). Yes, the shock is strong enough to be your limiter, the straps are there to fine tune your skidframe. :m2c: Mouse
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,141 Posts
Originally posted by 97MACH1-Boneman@Nov 11 2003, 12:09 PM
I've generally had an open mind to Arctic Cat. However, I am starting to get the impression that perhaps the overall "quality" of the cats is questionable. I hear a lot of people who just love the "cats". Is it possible that Arctic Cat is just "throwing" these sleds together? Concentrating an quantity instead of quality? Forgetting about things such as "proper" alignment of clutches and drive axels?

Again, I keep an open mind to all brands, it's just that I've been hearing about more problems with the "Cats" than I was previously aware of since I joined this message board and find it a bit surprising considering how some people talk about the "Cats"...

Just an observation......
This board is 98% Cat, so that is likely why you are seeing more "Problems" on Cats. I visit other sites from time to time, and I see clearly Cat has company in the "Problems" catagory. They all suck when they break.

OT.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,515 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Here's yet another update (over a year later!) on this topic.

I installed a new 1 3/8" track for this season, and with less than 400 miles on it, some of the interal lugs as I described in my original post above are already starting to "chunk out" again. I thought, "What in the [email protected]#$%^&*... there must be SOMETHING in here that's sharp enough to be doing that!!!" Well, after carefully studying the rear of my sled for a half hour or so, I think this time I REALLY got it figured out -- finally!

I'm 99.99% sure that it's the rear skid torsion springs -- specifically, the top/short leg of the rear springs that rests on the torsion spring adjustment blocks. I run my rear springs with the blocks in the highest/stiffest setting, and this positions the top/short leg of the rear springs closer to the top of the inside of the track than if you were in a lower/softer torsion spring block setting. This higher position, combined with a track tension that's set on the loose side, could (and I believe DOES!) let the track flex enough -- especially under certain conditions/bumps -- to let the outter rows of the center track lugs actually contact the squared, sharp edges of the top/short leg of the rear torsion springs. They line up PERFECTLY, the edges of the torsion spring ARE square and surely sharp enough to cut into the track lugs, and the paint is also missing in this exact area on the torsion springs.

Now that I'm all but positive what's causing this, I simply tightened up my track tension a bit, and also filed off the square, sharp edges of the torsion springs in the problem area described above.

Just thought I'd post this, since I knew this thread was still lurking in cyberland somewhere! -- Roy
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top