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On my enclosed trailer doors I have tried a few types..... I currently have Master rubber covered ones that cover the keyhole and they still freeze up . Any type/brand that are better ?? I am getting sick of using the torch etc. Thanks
 

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On my enclosed trailer doors I have tried a few types..... I currently have Master rubber covered ones that cover the keyhole and they still freeze up . Any type/brand that are better ?? I am getting sick of using the torch etc. Thanks[/b]
Skidmark I am not sure what model you are presently using. I use Master Pro series #6127 to lock my sled on saddle bag trips and I can honestly say that I have never had this lock freeze once and when I get to the hotel I simply lock the sled and let the lock drop on the ground. Come out the next morning put the key in and it pops open at any temp! The only thing I do is to put a couple of drops of gun oil in it at the start of the season. These locks are not cheap but well worth the money.

Andy

Master Lock 6127 2-5/8" Pro Series Weather Tough Pad Lock Keyed Different (6pk) Shackle: 1-3/8". 2-5/8" wide laminated steel body for superior strength. Hardened boron alloy shackle for superior cut resistance. 5-spool pin tumbler cylinder for added pick resistance. Removable cylinder can be replaced or repinned. Dual ball bearing locking mechanism resists pulling and prying. Body and cylinder covers protect locks from water, dirt and grime. Heavy steel bodies withstand forcible attacks.

Weather Tough Padlocks
 

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I have had success using high quality solid brass locks. Two years now, and had not had to get the torch out yet!!!

I also cut a 4"X4" flap of inner tube and use a nail to punch two holes in it. I then place the flap over the lock by pushing the shackle thru the holes.
 

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Technically speaking almost any lock can freeze if left to the elements enough. Here's a great way to prevent it. Bring the lock(s) inside, let them room temperature up, spray brake cleaner into the keyhole and the locking hole where the horseshoe locks into. Spray it good and get all the crud\water out of there. Let it dry overnight or at least a couple hours. Then spray some good GRAPHITE lube into the keyhole and lock hole. Graphite will remain slippery in a lock even in the dead of cold, it will take up the room from the water too. That's the best way to do it, also make sure you take car not to stick wet\snow covered keys into the lock and keep it covered from the elements for even better results.
 

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I have the same Master rubber covered locks, heres what I do. Make certain the lock is dry inside. Then get a tube of "Lock Ease" (think thats what its called, small blue container about the size of a 3 in 1 can) put a few drops in the slot and cycle the lock a few times, seems to be working for me. By the way, this is the same thing I do at work (we have A LOT of gates) and they arent the covered locks, holds up ok. Lock MUST be dry.
Craig
 

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Even th eMaster brass ones freeze. I have had the same lock on my tongue since 2003. It is an aluminum lock, I think it might be a "American" brand name.
Every season I spray it w/ some WD40 and it has always been great. Best of all, I bought 5 of them and all three sled trailers in the family have the same key, including mine that holds the ramp on.
 

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Locks freeze because of the water, Use products like silicone or WD40 to remove/repel the water. no water no freeze. if a good lubricant does not repel the water, it will still freeze slippery or not.
 
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