Hardcore Sledder banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anyone else looking at putting a P22 RMK clutch on there new XCR 850 ? I would really like to give one a try.
 

·
Registered
Matryx Assault 850 and Fully Loaded Titan Beast
Joined
·
2,093 Posts
I have heard very little about it. Tell us more if you know something?
 

·
Registered
2021 INDY 850 VR1 137
Joined
·
91 Posts
This is from Snowtech magazine...
2022 marks the addition of a new drive clutch dubbed the P22 which is only utilized on boosted models where the P22 replaces the P85. Both designations refer to the year they were first released. Yes, what we are saying is the P85 Polaris drive clutches that we have been using originated in 1985. They have gone through many renditions since then, but the original design is still being used. Where the P22 differs from the P85 is the P22 utilizes an idler bearing on the center shaft to allow the belt deflection to be tight all the time, even as the belt wears. It also has a splined spider which allows the moveable sheave to be removed once the center bolt is removed, normally without a puller.
This clutch resembles the drive clutch being used on the RZR Pro XP and late model Ranger models. The spider, cap and moveable sheave appear to be beefed up from their P85 counterparts. We’re assuming Polaris found this need when offering the horsepower that the boosted models provide. The driven clutch is the same Team Industries TSS-04 with the belt deflection adjuster removed. As the belt wears, the sheaves of the driven clutch simply come closer together taking up the slack and keeping the belt tight. If this sounds familiar, it’s because Arctic Cat has had this feature since 2018.

Having tight belt deflection is critical in making the sled perform well right at engagement. It makes the transition from disengaged to engaged nearly seamless. This is a very welcome trait, especially for deep snow riders as they continue to gravitate their riding styles to tighter, more technical terrain. Slow speed tractability is crucial to us being able to effectively navigate this type of terrain. The number one mistake we find with riders is failure to adjust the belt deflection. We are excited for this new P22 clutch and not having to monitor belt deflection any longer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Being that the clutch is only available on boost models It might be initially expensive and hard to order. I'm very interested in giving the new clutch a try on a flat land sled though. IMO. the P85 needs to be replaced with a more durable clutch for all 850's
 

·
Premium Member
20 850 Assault and 21 Indy XC 650 137
Joined
·
3,307 Posts
I suspect it has something to do with the turbo. It would be nice to have it on a trail sled though.
 

·
Premium Member
20 850 Assault and 21 Indy XC 650 137
Joined
·
3,307 Posts
Maybe we will see it on trail sleds for 23
Maybe. The P85 has been a solid clutch, but we are due for an upgrade. I'd like to see a wider pivot for the weights. It would help the bushing wear I think. Wonder if the P22 uses same 10 series weights?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Yup, the space between the spider is way wider than P85. If you look at pics it is very clear that the weights are completely different than then the P85 weights. My guess is since the turbo develops a flat horsepower curve from sea level to 10,000 feet that they might not have any different weights available yet. I recall seeing a pic of one of the new boost sleds there was a 79 marked on the weight. Before I run out and buy a P22, I would make sure to find out primary weights available.
 

·
Registered
Matryx Assault 850 and Fully Loaded Titan Beast
Joined
·
2,093 Posts
This is from Snowtech magazine...
2022 marks the addition of a new drive clutch dubbed the P22 which is only utilized on boosted models where the P22 replaces the P85. Both designations refer to the year they were first released. Yes, what we are saying is the P85 Polaris drive clutches that we have been using originated in 1985. They have gone through many renditions since then, but the original design is still being used. Where the P22 differs from the P85 is the P22 utilizes an idler bearing on the center shaft to allow the belt deflection to be tight all the time, even as the belt wears. It also has a splined spider which allows the moveable sheave to be removed once the center bolt is removed, normally without a puller.
This clutch resembles the drive clutch being used on the RZR Pro XP and late model Ranger models. The spider, cap and moveable sheave appear to be beefed up from their P85 counterparts. We’re assuming Polaris found this need when offering the horsepower that the boosted models provide. The driven clutch is the same Team Industries TSS-04 with the belt deflection adjuster removed. As the belt wears, the sheaves of the driven clutch simply come closer together taking up the slack and keeping the belt tight. If this sounds familiar, it’s because Arctic Cat has had this feature since 2018.

Having tight belt deflection is critical in making the sled perform well right at engagement. It makes the transition from disengaged to engaged nearly seamless. This is a very welcome trait, especially for deep snow riders as they continue to gravitate their riding styles to tighter, more technical terrain. Slow speed tractability is crucial to us being able to effectively navigate this type of terrain. The number one mistake we find with riders is failure to adjust the belt deflection. We are excited for this new P22 clutch and not having to monitor belt deflection any longer.
It all sounded great until you mentioned it being familiar to Arctic Cat's clutching in 2018. Isn't this when they started blowing up belts constantly?
I'm sure POO will do better than that. I hope so, because what you stated sounds great otherwise.
Thanks for your post. I can't wait to hear how it works next year.
 

·
Premium Member
2022XCR850137 / 2022 SL 850 Boost
Joined
·
6,711 Posts
It all sounded great until you mentioned it being familiar to Arctic Cat's clutching in 2018. Isn't this when they started blowing up belts constantly?
I'm sure POO will do better than that. I hope so, because what you stated sounds great otherwise.
Thanks for your post. I can't wait to hear how it works next year.
Actually the hole clutch was exploding.
 

·
Registered
Matryx Assault 850 and Fully Loaded Titan Beast
Joined
·
2,093 Posts
All I remember in that time frame with Arctic Cat was seeing all kinds of brand new flashy cats on the side of the trail with hoods up. If there isn't buddies with them I usually stop and ask if they need help. It was always a Belt. Then I started reading about belt failures here on HCS. A few years later one of my once in a while riding buddies was all happy to tell me he bought a new sled. When I heard what he bought I nicely said isn't that one of the models that blows belts all the time? He said NO this one still has the stock belt on it. I said, "Oh that's cool". We went riding and 30 miles out of town "BOOM" the belt blew to pieces. A little later that year he admitted I was right and that it blew so many belts he started buying the cheapest $60 belts he could find. Kept 3-4 belts with him at all times. I'm sure the P22 will be better than that. Anyways, I'm glad the BOOST guys are the ones Guinea Pigging that Boost system and P22 clutch system. Other than the newness of it I'm pretty excited to hear of both new POO innovations. Just hope they are all the hype they are said to be?
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
10,291 Posts
even that clutch could not handle any more boost then what the sled will come with. Chris Burant was blowing one a day up running more boost. the p-22 is a RZR clutch. it will take a HRP or MICRO BELMONT to run more boost on these. you know the after market is already toying with this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,334 Posts
It all sounded great until you mentioned it being familiar to Arctic Cat's clutching in 2018. Isn't this when they started blowing up belts constantly?
I'm sure POO will do better than that. I hope so, because what you stated sounds great otherwise.
Thanks for your post. I can't wait to hear how it works next year.
Didn’t the AC system have some sort of brace that fixed the clutch’s center-to-center distance too?
 

·
Brand loyal, not brand blind
Joined
·
15,137 Posts
This was a post on FB when I asked some P22 guestions: Greg Marier that is correct Greg. Talking with Marty Sampson the P22 uses an idler bearing . The shaft the belt sits on is now on a sleeve that sits on bearing . This eliminates the drag between the clutch and the belt. Now when the sled is idling the belt is not resting against any moving parts .This allows the belt to be kept super tight. The new Turbo Boost sled does not even have an adjustment for belt deflection on the secondary. The belt is super tight so the sled is starting in the lowest gear ratio all the time. Their is no belt deflection to be taken up when the primary engages.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
Polaris ATV have been using this for a long time also. My 09 sportsman 850 used the setup. They engage smoother and a constant tension/ zero deflection setup is nice, but the bearing on the atv can cause issues if it gets a drink of water on the clutches, it never likes the dirty water much. Had it apart a number of times to clean and grease it. It would be hard to get in gear when the bearing was dragging.
I think its a welcome addition.
 

·
Premium Member
MY21 650 SBA 146, ES, ICE Storm 1.5
Joined
·
6,120 Posts
Polaris ATV have been using this for a long time also. My 09 sportsman 850 used the setup. They engage smoother and a constant tension/ zero deflection setup is nice, but the bearing on the atv can cause issues if it gets a drink of water on the clutches, it never likes the dirty water much. Had it apart a number of times to clean and grease it. It would be hard to get in gear when the bearing was dragging.
I think its a welcome addition.
On the ATV's Polaris used a one-way sprague type of bearing on the primary clutch "idler" bearing, so that they could have engine braking effect when going down a hill. Of course that would not work with a 2 stroke engine that runs backwards for reverse. As soon as the engine reversed, you would be going backward, NOW!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
On the ATV's Polaris used a one-way sprague type of bearing on the primary clutch "idler" bearing, so that they could have engine braking effect when going down a hill. Of course that would not work with a 2 stroke engine that runs backwards for reverse. As soon as the engine reversed, you would be going backward, NOW!
You can eliminate the engine brake on them by modifying that bearing. Much easier on the belt, harder on the brake pads though.
The sled should be a good setup, I see no down side other than maintenance on the bearing itself.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top