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Has anyone ran a P2 Secondary on an 800 Axys? Looking for a good starting clutch setup. Sled is a 2018 Pro S 800 with Dynoport pipe and Slp billet head. I’m thinking 50-44 Full Progressive Dalton helix with a 140/200 spring to start??
 

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This is from several years ago, I posted at Polaris Starpower

Dalton adjustables QAP-3 If not using those weights, get a set of Polaris 10-68 weights and a black 120-310 Polaris primary spring part# 7043681. A Dalton P2 48-44FP or a 50-44FP helix these are custom cut by Dalton but they have cut them before so there should not be a setup charge. I ran the 50-44 but wanted to try the 48-44. The 48-44 might be a safer bet if you don't want to fiddle. Get 2 Polaris P2 springs. a 140-200 part# 7043495 and a 145-220 part# 7043496. If you only want one, buy the 140-200. If you buy both start with the 140-200. If you need a little more backshift and topend rpm try the 145-220. I would adjust the gearing to at least 1.68 or 1.73 You can just replace the upper 23 gear to a 22, use the stock chain and bottom 37 gear. this gives you a 1.68 ratio, which is a improvement over the stock 1.61 ratio. it does put a bigger bend in the chain. Or you can go to a 40 bottom gear and a 70 pitch chain, with the stock 23 top gear. this gives the 1.73 ratio, which is what many, (most?) trail guys change to that regear. Everything I posted above has been ran by many, with the exception of the P2, but that setup has still been used by several. I don't claim to have invented the setups, but I have ran them and was pretty happy with it. You can fiddle with all the above based on what you want, but this is a very good setup. I ride up in Vilas County every winter, so you probably know the conditions I encounter.
 

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never tested a p-2 on a 800. the lack of helixes is why. i know Dalton has them but they are in Canada. they want a $10,000 up front order to become a dealer. i don't have any distributors that carry them. WPS, AUTOMATIC. so that's why. i asked a Polaris rep why it wasn't on the 800's ? his answer was it didn't hold up in testing? not sure about that?
 

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I copied this, from someone else that copied it. From May 2015. Just passing it along:

Thought it would be good base line information to post destructive test and technical information below that compares the P2 Vs. TSS-04 secondaries. The engineer that generated the comparison is very qualified and is based on actual hands on test results and CVT power train design experience. I don't feel it is appropriate to reveal the source at this time but just consider the information as input when your TSS-04 need replacing. I hope to devote time this winter (if we get snow) refining both primary and P2 clutches spring and weight combinations for a 2010 Turbo LX with 2012 flash. To date the TSS-04 with PS helix is favored and that's only due to the extensive development and work by others on the site. In the end I believe the P2 with 3 rollers will rank on top. The TSS-04 non replaceable helix bushing and sheave bushing wear is the culprit that gradually causes performance deterioration. Another topic on this site shows a prototype replacement TSS helix bushing with 2.5 times the surface area.

The P2 has better top speed and back shift for several reasons:
1) It runs less spring force because its engagement and shift out heights are bigger than the team. The high shift out force of the Team restricts high ratio
2) Its bearing span is wider and therefore it can run looser fitting bearings while maintaining the same or better sheave alignment
3) Three rollers keep the moveable sheave more correctly aligned with the stationary during up-shift and down-shift.
4) The helix stands alone in the clutch. It does not attach to a sheave. This separates the torque transfer function from the torque feedback function. Belt pull (800-1000 lbs force) does not side load the helix.
5) The spring stays centered in the clutch and the sides of the spring do the rub anything in the clutch like in the team. The Team TSS-04 implemented this change on the 2011 models to improve backshift. They did it by chamfering the spider spring cup and added the same chamfer as the P2 to the steel spring cup.
6) The P2 come stock with a delrin cup in the helix to reduce friction
7) The three rollers maintain sheave spacing all around the clutch in the neutral position. Look at how much wider the sheave spacing is on the Team clutch near the tension adjuster screw. This affects your starting ratio.
The P2 lives on an engine test dyno approximately 3 times that of the Team TSS-04. The Team TSS-04 will complete 9 power-on jumps off a 3 foot loading ramp on wet dirt with 192 studded track before it either shatters the roller or spins the threaded in shaft.
The P2, with it's cast-in shaft, will complete between 28 and 45 of the same jump and will crack the stationary sheave at the shaft interface or break a tooth off the helix. The suspension rails will be replaced three times before completing this test with the P2. The suspension rails are the fuse in a sled with the P2.
I have run this clutch on my race sleds for 4 years now with no issues. I don't know anyone that has switched to this clutch and had issues.
 
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