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Premium Member
2019 850 Pro S S.B. 2006 600 Fusion
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5,843 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
It is still an ongoing ordeal. Seems like every time I think I'm getting closer to getting more done, I find more stuff to do. At this point, I have plans to work out what I do have left. It is kinda longwinded, but here goes:

Intro:
As several people on here already know, last spring, I bought a 20005 Fusion. With a blown motor... (surprised?) Actually, the one I got was mostly missing stuff because this dealer demo sled gave its original engine up to an unfortunate customer. Yeah, yeah, I'd read about 'em way before I bought it, then started pricing out what it would cost to fit the remaining parts to make the 900 a runner, (BIG dollars). Bare bone engines needing rebuilds and updates hovered for over a grand on Ebay. And to make it a reliable runner would always a bone of contention, and I was looking to ride something smooth, because my hands go numb even after holding a paintbrush for longer than five minutes. From all the reports I read on here and on Snowest, I wanted something that I could expect to last, I like to ride my sleds, not spend hours making them look like they're in a parade, or leave them lurking in the garage, whether in hibernation or in the shop for repairs. I'd ridden a Fusion and the newest Polaris sleds and was impressed. I wanted something that would be easier on the body when we put on those 200 mile days. All easy miles, too...

While searching on here, Snowest and a couple other websites for information, it sounded like nobody recommended fitting anything but the original 900 engine in this sled, let alone a big block non-ves engine. They have done a big block swap in the race chassis, the newer Fusions, and even in the IQ series, but not in this one. Using the older non-ves, the biggest drawback is you can't get a reverse to work (unless you could snag onto a newer style ignition and then wire it in, another project for later-maybe/maybe NOT). And since I had dialed in my engines using button clutches, the spline jackshaft is another obstacle that makes the Team "98" roller the clutch I will be working with. I have obtained several helixes to try. Welcome to the new stuff.

In 2006, Polaris made a few “updates” and have kept refining them ever since, but this design was the first “A” arm front end, and along with everything else, they definitely made this morphodite quite the “package”. Since Polaris made it basically a “one off” design, I figgered on doing the same. It does not lend itself to dropping a different engine in with a new motor plate and away we go mentality. I relish this kind of project, and it is/was keeping my ideas flowing trying to figger out how to squeeze this engine into this chassis. It's not something I would recommend to anyone, unless you enjoy a challenge, but you might take a look at what I've encountered and worked out for solutions. Maybe you'll come up with something even better if you decide this is anything like what you'd like to try. I am open for comments and WTF's.



Carburetors face towards the rear, not the forward facing EFI that the 900 had. Engine mounts, steering, cutting pieces of the sides and a crossmember of the chassis so the engine could sit as low as practical, pipe fitting, instruments, air box, reservoirs, hose routing, wiring all have to be redesigned and reworked. I've still got plenty more to do...

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I took apart the headlight because the amber reflector was flopping around, and when I tried to first glue the little bugger in place, it got slightly out of position and left some glue trails and marks inside the lenses. Fun with a heat gun, a handful of screwdrivers, sealer and a sanding and polishing ordeal ensued. I glued the other one in as long as I was in there. Looks like a common problem...

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Premium Member
2019 850 Pro S S.B. 2006 600 Fusion
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5,843 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Getting started:


I had a couple old, toasted 900 blocks that came with the sled, and the mounts, so I put them together and took an inventory of how they fit, to get an idea where Polaris had them aligned. I took a few measurements, and started pulling out all the unusable items that would not relate to this swap.


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I made a “tripod” with a block and tackle to set over the bare chassis, as I knew I would not be able to maneuver the engine up and down in the fine increments needed to determine how to fit it in, and what needed to be changed, relocated or removed. I could see right away the steering post and the jackshaft were immediate obstacles, and I would resort to cutting parts off the sides to get the engine down far enough, this engine is a tad wider than the original 900.

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The people who have attempted these similar swaps say the jackshaft would be in the way of the carburetors. And they would typically tilt the engine, have the carburetors aim over the jackshaft in the newer Fuses and IQ's, often using shorter carb boots, and pod filters. I opted to cut out about an inch of depth of the tunnel, remove the water traps from the carbs (I epoxied the holes where the hoses attached to make better clearance), and go under the higher 2005 jackshaft and make an airbox connection from there. After measuring, I found the closest the track/studs would get to is still the lowest part of the front cooler, so whatever track would normally fit on here would not be hindered by my cutting out a part of the tunnel. I'm running a 1.25” track with 1.375” studs. I would eventually make a plate and have a friend weld it in place where I cut out the hole. I would also need to reinforce the jackshaft bearing mount later, too, because the original supporting bracket would be in the way of the new airbox area.

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Premium Member
2019 850 Pro S S.B. 2006 600 Fusion
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5,843 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Steering:


The original Fusion steering post was gonna be in the way of the new engine mounting, so I needed to move it over, but had to incorporate a separate tube fed from a special center steering post mount I fabricated that would replace the flimsy rider select version Polaris put out. It had to fit inside the fuel tank cutout, and mount securely to the steering hoop plate. I had to keep the secondary post close to the tunnel so it wouldn't rub the engine or the mounting areas. I moved the lower stock post base mount over, leaving barely enough room for the coolant hose to meet with the front cooler connection, squared up by sanding and cutting the bottom of it, made new screw holes and repositioned the CV joint so it would be as straight as possible. I utilized a swivel bar to align the steering post off to the side, too. After I had decided the routing needed, I saw an interesting design at the Haydays swapmeet. Polaris had cutaways of their frames on display, and their newest sleds had used something similar, but went forward over the engine with a swivel bar mating to a separate down post to the steering arms. My version goes sideways about 4 inches at the top, then down, and underneath the engine, very close to the original trough they made in the chassis floor.

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The center post is from an edge, shortened, and slightly modified, using a small steering rod with ball joint ends to mate the two posts' actions. The secondary post is from an IQR or newer Prox440 sled, mounted upside down, welded to the original Fusion CV joint, with a narrowed (to keep from rubbing the engine) post made from a reinforced steering arm, welded underneath the CV coupler, and added my own limit/stop connector for the bottom stock steering arm. I used the threads in the lower part of the steering arm to lock fit a grade 8 bolt. I cut off the hex head, narrowed the exposed end slightly to fit inside the stock ball joint at the bottom base mount connection, then cut threads on the bolt end to install a nut for better security, locking it to the stock base swivel/ball, similar to the stock design. Whew!! I think the lower end could be stronger, though, but it's at least as strong as the original, maybe a little bit more so.

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Premium Member
2019 850 Pro S S.B. 2006 600 Fusion
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5,843 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Speedometer:


The speedometer connection was modified to fit the old style cable. I partially drilled out a grade 8 bolt and screwed it into the drive shaft, where the stock trigger would normally fit, got the steel insert with the square hole from the old style driveshaft and press fit with loctite into the bolt so the “key” would match the Gen 2/700 version. The newer drive shaft is hollow, so I had to make sure the “key” would bottom inside the bolt, that way, it wouldn't fall inside the driveshaft. Once I had the key in place, I could determine how deep the cable drive would need to be to fit, centered and welded the 700 housing with the speedo drive at the right height onto the original Fusion 900 bearing retainer.





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Dash:


I siamesed the 700 series speedometer and tach so they would fit into the weird sized hole left when I took the 900's electronic MFD (muli function display) out. I had to epoxy them together, after carefully cutting them open and aligning the two round housings together. I had some aluminum diamond plate I cut to help fit the displays in the dash, then siliconed the heck out of the gauges to keep them secure.



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Premium Member
2019 850 Pro S S.B. 2006 600 Fusion
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5,843 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
The last several weeks, I've been wrestling with the engine mount system. Early, I'd made an engine mock-up so I could determine what my general idea to fit would be, but once I started dropping the engine into place, I could see I would have to work around the cooling lines, and keep the alignment with the secondary. I had to realign the steering post from my first couple attempts to what I wound up with (which is posted above). It fits, but it is really close, yet far enough away from hitting anything. It wouldn't fit any other way unless I could somehow go over the engine, like the race versions. Not gonna happen here, the rest of the steering is buried way under the frame. I added a small aluminum bracket to one of the recoil bolts where I could zip-tie the wires coming out from the engine, and it keeps them in a position where they are pliable/loose enough to be unaffected by vibration and movement, yet held in place where they won't get pinched or rubbed on anything.

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I took the aluminum hose that fit behind the right footwell area, cut off a piece, and spliced it to the front cooler, secured it under the steering arm/trough, attached it with 3/4" gray hose couplings you can buy at most hardware stores, and brought the coolant access up to the front of the engine where I can hook into the radiator and coolant reservoir. When I went to have my flat carb "access" plate installed, I had my friend also weld up all the holes I put in during this process. It's all trial and error.

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Before I even had purchased the sled, I'd bought an engine mounting plate from a guy on HCS, but it is designed for fitting a big block into the newer Fusions/IQ. Since it doesn't fit this set-up, I will be selling it once this project is finished. Looks like a nice piece, though...


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I obtained three aluminum engine brackets from an '03 800 edge model. A friend welded an additional end onto the mag side forward facing bracket to clear the steering rod that goes from the post to the pitman arm. In the rear, I installed three Polaris standard front mounts from the 2000 Gen 2. The holes line up right even with the top edge of the front cooler. The new plate lines up with the the edge, too. The edge brackets fit underneath some fancy engine plate I'd gotten years ago to help eliminate engine flex. I had my friend weld an additional center bracket to the engine plate to secure it for helping to spread the load out better. You wouldn't need the engine plate, except you wouldn't be able to add the third (center) bracket. The idea was to mount the engine so the carbs fit under the jackshaft, and close enough so the tops of the carbs would not rub and still be able to easily unscrew.



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I built reinforced steel “pans” for the front mounts, (mainly using steel here because I can weld steel, I'm not so good with aluminum yet), and will use the standard 800 edge rectangular mounts on them, then riveted and bolted the pans onto the floor and sides. I had to design the pans, fitting them around the structural rivets and brackets, mount them to the frame, then make plates to fit down on top of those, and once I have the engine lined up correctly, weld them in position.


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Premium Member
2019 850 Pro S S.B. 2006 600 Fusion
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5,843 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Can't wait to see it when it's all done. Are you going to do a custom paint job since your doing all of the custom work for the motor?

If you know me, I am not one to leave anything alone for too long... We will see, it is almost like new as it is. I already have my brother working on a little Boris (from Bullwinkle) holding a lit bomb for the side panel...
 

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Premium Member
2019 850 Pro S S.B. 2006 600 Fusion
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5,843 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Fuel access:
Instead of using the fuel pump style pickup used for the EFI injectors, I took a piece of fairly thick sheetmetal, drilled/matched the mounting holes and welded on a standard Fusion 600 pickup for the fuel tank. I installed it using Yamabond 4 sealer and the original thick rubber gasket. I obtained a fuel cap with the gauge from an Assault, and I'd thought about using an electric 2” gauge, but that's a project maybe for later. The wires are there if I ever decide to go with it.

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A couple nights ago, I spent several hours with some pieces of 1.375” aluminum rod, and my mini-lathe. I was making new carb bowl trap eliminators. They turned out pretty good, I loctited them in position and used the original O rings. I had some spares that I originally used some high grade epoxy on, but I thought I'd try making the parts after the local salvage yard guy couldn't come up with any factory stuff... 18mm x 1.0 thread.

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I have the engine installed. (YEA!!!) I made a backing plate for underneath inside the tunnel to add some reinforcement, and it worked out very nicely. I had opened up several areas on the plate where rivets were protuding, so now it fits pretty snug against both the upper mounting of the front cooler, and the lip of the tunnel plate I had my buddy weld in place. The lips of each of them matched right where the holes are for the rear mounts. I had to remove the Y pipe to gain enough room to reach the magneto side mount arm. To put the washer and nut on, I had to raise the engine slightly with a crowbar to get that nut on, it's that close of a fit. I tightened all the mount nuts down, and measured my offset for the clutch, the preferred range is between .000” and .040”, and with no shims or anything, it's set at .017”, well within spec., and about as close to perfect as it can get. Center to center is 10.625” for the Iqr spec. belt.

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Premium Member
2019 850 Pro S S.B. 2006 600 Fusion
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5,843 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
What are you gonna use on the carbs for an airbox?
I went on ebay and got some 3 ply silicone tubing to fit perfect over the carb bells, and will extend those under the jackshaft into a box, I'll prolly be cutting up one from one of my existing boxes, and do some plastic welding and reinforce it with some aluminum bracketing, I'll be running the top up to a foam connection in the hood, similar to the 600 Fusion series. There should be enough room in between the carbs and the fuel tank to get something to fit without becoming restrictive.
 

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Premium Member
2019 850 Pro S S.B. 2006 600 Fusion
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5,843 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I've got snowblowers coming out of my ears, and snow isn't predicted... yet. I still have folks bringing me lawnmowers and saws to fix still, too. Good thing the bus company is a tad slow with all the fall sports winding down, but winter sports are just around the corner... I'll be driving lots more in a week or two. Every time I get a good block of time, I'm figgering out stuff for it, and yeah, I'm hoping to have it ready for this season when the trails open up December 1st. Getting the engine bolted down for the "last" time was a big step, and a huge sigh of relief. The rest is not gonna take so much messing with to make fit, although fitting the pipe is my next major job. Having a spare sled that's ready to go is not forcing me to cut many corners hurrying to make this one right.
 

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Premium Member
2019 Pros switchback
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2,393 Posts
hopefully we can meet up for maiden voyage?looking good!!!you're going to love that new ride!!
 

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Premium Member
2019 850 Pro S S.B. 2006 600 Fusion
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5,843 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
In between things, I have been fitting the pipe. I am really getting more and more respect for those pipe builders. I had plenty of trials with just one pipe, I can only imagine making two or even three fit in this thing, WOW!!

I had to measure my SLP pipe from my 700 and try as best as I could to maintain the correct dimensions throughout while reworking the bends and obstacles this narrow chassis affords. Then keep it from getting too close to the hood, and find places to make mounts and springs. Anytime custom pipe makers design pipes, many from scratch, it takes a lot of effort to get it to fit, and still make it do what it's s'posed to do.

I had an old copy of Gordon Jennings' handbook on two stroke tuning, so I refreshed my memory with some theories and ideals.

I took the original 900 pipe and did some measuring, laid the measurements out on a flat piece of cardboard, and superimposed the SLP pipe dimensions with a different colour. I was surprised how close they both were though, almost matching, the last cone was a tad bit more shallow on the 900 pipe, prolly to keep the powerband spread out and a little less peaky. I kept the drawings close at hand when I was trying to determine where they put the bends in as I started cutting up mine. The layback position of the 900 engine gave them more length before their turns, but I had a basic mount to base my general plan of attack.

I had some difficulties welding thin rusty metal, and spent several hours just plugging small leaks after I had made it fit. Still have a little bit more to go on it before I can officially mount it, but hopefully I'll get it done before the Thanksgiving holiday (and the annual Duluth National Sno-cross) comes.

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