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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a 2001 ZR800 with the ACT adjustable shocks. I am a 240lb guy, and was curious what the right process was to set the suspension up? Any info would be great. I heard turning the adjuster to the right is harder, left softer, but I wasn't sure if that was correct or if there was something else this adjustment changed. Fairly new to the sled world
 

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If you get under the sled and look at the adjusters on the torsien springs, you'll see that the adjuster allows for 3 different preload settings. You want to be careful turning them. Turn them both so that the top turns toward the back of the sled, otherwise you could break them. In other words, the driver side will turn clockwise, and the passenger side will turn counter-clockwise. For your weight, I'd try them all the way on the highest setting. You may want to turn the front skid spring a couple turns to increase its preload too.

I've found from riding my 02 ZL SS (same suspension geometry) and my friend's 01 ZR that the ZR will resist bottomming pretty well for your weight (I weigh 250) even with the stock setup. It'll sag a mile when you sit on it, but the shocks work well. If you add too much spring to the sled, the bottomming issue doesn't really improve a lot, but you wind up with an uncomfortable ride in the smaller bumps. My ZL SS bottommed a lot, and adding the stiffer rear springs helped a bit, but it ruined the ride quality over small bumps. Now I've got the heavy rear springs and a heavy front arm spring, and now the bottomming problem is finally gone.

In other words, if you find yourself bottomming the skid a lot, consider a bigger spring for the front arm in the rear suspension. Don't just keep throwing more spring at the rear of the skid to solve the problem.
 

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Go out and get the snopro springs 0704 - 876 and 0704 - 877. Left and right rear springs. These are square and do not sag out as fast. You will much happier will your suspension performance right across the board and especially if you weigh 240.

Have a good winter.
 

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call Fett Brothers they are good at setting up a suspension, it takes more than just heavy springs to get it to ride right, you need to revalve your shocks also. This prob isnt the answer you want but it would be the best way to get it to perform.
 

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I think hes talking about the handle bar mounted shock adjustment. If anyone has any tip for him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think hes talking about the handle bar mounted shock adjustment. If anyone has any tip for him.[/b]
Just trying to figure out the best way to get it set up as best as possible with whats on it for now. I spent all my extra $ on the sled, and at least for the two months left of this season need to make the best of what I have. What exactly does the handlebar mounted adjuster do? How about the dials on the front shock reservoirs? Maybe a general setting I should set this all at for now?
 

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Just trying to figure out the best way to get it set up as best as possible with whats on it for now. I spent all my extra $ on the sled, and at least for the two months left of this season need to make the best of what I have. What exactly does the handlebar mounted adjuster do? How about the dials on the front shock reservoirs? Maybe a general setting I should set this all at for now?[/b]
The handle bar mounted resevoir does not change shock valving, it only lengthens or shortens the front shock to adjust ski pressure. A turn or two is usually all you need, if you turn it right you are shortening the shock which will add ski pressure. If you turn it to the left you are lengthening the shock to remove ski pressure. You can put a block of wood under the center of the track and make the adjustments to the dial to see if the shock is working correctly. Keep in mind the adjustment/movement on the shock is subtle but makes difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The handle bar mounted resevoir does not change shock valving, it only lengthens or shortens the front shock to adjust ski pressure. A turn or two is usually all you need, if you turn it right you are shortening the shock which will add ski pressure. If you turn it to the left you are lengthening the shock to remove ski pressure. You can put a block of wood under the center of the track and make the adjustments to the dial to see if the shock is working correctly. Keep in mind the adjustment/movement on the shock is subtle but makes difference.[/b]

Makes sense. In what case would it benefit me to do this? What does more or less ski pressure equate to while trailriding?
 

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If you are starting with what you feel is a perfect setup and trail conditions change to icy in the corners you can dial in more ski pressure to avoid pushing. Another example would be if you feel the sled is over steering can you remove ski pressure. Again this is all very subtle, but it suits the purpose. I have had one on my sleds since 1998.
 
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