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My 2002 ZR500 CCE went down yesterday. Younger brother and I were out hitting the trails to celebrate my 40th Birthday. I was on my F7 and my brother was on my wife's '02 500. I was stopped at a trail marker and he came up to me and it sounded like his sled was running on one cylinder. We stopped at a watering hole and I decided to pull the plugs. The left one looked great and the right one actually had a piece of metal stuck near the gap. Clearly the right cylinder went down. Got it on the trailer and called it a day. What are the costs associated with this fix and who has done this before? Is it something that is preventable in the future? I have read about shim spacers for the apv valves. I tried a search on this site but it came out pretty weak. Any help is appreciated.
 

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My 2002 ZR500 CCE went down yesterday. Younger brother and I were out hitting the trails to celebrate my 40th Birthday. I was on my F7 and my brother was on my wife's '02 500. I was stopped at a trail marker and he came up to me and it sounded like his sled was running on one cylinder. We stopped at a watering hole and I decided to pull the plugs. The left one looked great and the right one actually had a piece of metal stuck near the gap. Clearly the right cylinder went down. Got it on the trailer and called it a day. What are the costs associated with this fix and who has done this before? Is it something that is preventable in the future? I have read about shim spacers for the apv valves. I tried a search on this site but it came out pretty weak. Any help is appreciated.[/b]
Pull the power valves and check the pins. this model sled was notorious for wear in the pin and for some reason, unlike the 600 which has stops built into the cylender, the vavles on the 500 can hit the piston. Check both sides. Replace as needed is what I understand and you probably want to shim them out a bit in the future to protect from this if that is the actual problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. Anyone else experienced this with their '02 500?
 

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Thanks. Anyone else experienced this with their '02 500?[/b]
Not so many reporting em this year but in seasons gone by theres been a fair number. Even once you replace the pins / valves, it'll happen again. Like I said before, a shame that AC fudged up what was once one of their best engines.
 

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Thanks. Anyone else experienced this with their '02 500?[/b]
Yep, Cought it just in time. Had the leading edge of the valve shined up at only 1200 miles on the clock. Shim them for an added safety margin.
 

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My 01 ZR was starting to hit the piston. Shimmed it to hopefully prevent it from happening again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys. Anyone have any idea what this could possibly cost me? Worse case/best case scenario? Looking to have the dealer do the work...
 

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Since it's an ongoing issue with the 500, I'd suggest you buy a service CD and tackle it yourself so you get familiar with it.
cyls can be purchased on an exchange basis
pistons / rings etc, stick with OEM AC.
Engine is very straight forward to remove / work on with pretty basic tools and a torque wrench.
 

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agreed.
200 for a cylinder trade in. 100 for a piston, I'd do both. --use cat oem--- and 50 for gaskets. pretty easy job. maybe an afternoon or evening's work.
 

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Before you put everything back together you must do two things. As mentioned you must shim the exhaust valves to help prevent reoccurrance of what hapened. The other is to check your exhaust valves. Pull them out and clean them up. Then hold them side by side and look at the holes that the pins go through. The holes should be round and not egg or oval shaped. The holes are chamfered so they appear oval but look past the chamfer and at the hole itself. If the hole is oval the exhaust valve will move around and then more quickly wear out the pin. The pins wear fast enough you don't need the exhaust valve flopping around creating more issues. Another way to check is to put a new pin through the hole of the exhaust valve. Hold the pin length wise between your forefinger and thumb. Now wiggle the valve back and forth. If there is pronounced movement then the valve is junk. The fit should be fairly tight.

I blew out two pistons and rings on the same side before I realized that the issue may be with the valve itself. The pin hole on that side was not round. I did both of the checks that I mentioned above and then also had it measured at a tool shop to verify. The valve is a hardened steel part and the pin is not so the pin did not cause the ovalization to the valve hole. The valve was made that way. I junked the valve and replaced it and also shimmed the valves. No problems since then except for minor pin wear (I have checked every 500 miles) and that was two season ago that the work was complete.

I'm not saying you are experiencing exactly what I did but since you are going to have it apart anyway you might as well check.
 
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