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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Rear Suspension:

How many people know there are zerk (grease) fittings on your rear skid? If it is a Polaris, there are a lot of them, and most Polaris riders never grease the rear skids. I see the results when I rebuild older sleds.

There are grease fittings all over the rear skid. Note that one here has fallen out. Check these and replace if necessary:
[attachment=91339:attachment][attachment=91340:attachment]

In fact, often when people think their shocks are shot or they need new springs, the reality is the grease in all the cross members has dried up and the outer frame is beginning to rust, causing the inner shafts to sieze (ie - no more rotation at the hinge points).

The owner of this sled spent $350 on new gas shocks and coil over spring because he thought they were bad. The reality is that every cross shaft was siezed with rust and the suspension couldn't move if he wanted it to. He's lucky he didn't break something - this shaft is so rusted in I couldn't pound it out with a 10lb mallet. I'll have to make a new one from solid aluminum rod:
[attachment=91341:attachment]

If your idler bearings are this bad, or if they wobble, replace them ALL. Your sled will ride much better: [attachment=91342:attachment]

If you have the time and the tools, periodically disassemble the rear skid components, clean everything and re-assemble using a high quality synthetic grease like Mobil 1. If you don't, still take the time to squeeze some chassis grease through the zerk fittings. Again, I prefer Mobil 1, but any chassis grease will do. You'll be amazed at how much more responsive your rear suspension will be after you do this.
 

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Good heads up post flylake. If people would take a little time to read there manual, all grease points are shown with illustration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. I finally had to trash this x-tra 12 suspension. Too much rust and damage. It could have easily been saved through annual maintenance.
 

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Thanks for the heads-up flylake! :div20:

We learned the hard way to maintain our suspensions. Had a 1987 Polaris Indy Trail we bought used as a beater sled. Soon found that the whole rear suspension was frozen up with rust. Ended up replacing the front torque arm on the suspension, because the shaft would not come out. found the holes through the tunnel ovaled out too, due to the lack of suspension motion.

Needless to say, our skids come out and get fully greased, cleaned, and idler wheel bearings checked at the beginning of each season.

Like you said, if you do not take out the skid, at least inspect everything, and shoot grease into all those zerks!!

Good subject for this time of year! Some of the early birds will be working on them soon, and this will serve as a good reminder!! :div20:
 
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