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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to hear thoughts and opinions about using a 4 pad set of scales to set the preload of the springs for my sleds. I have always considered the front track shock spring to be the most important setting for weight distribution, but it is a pain in the ass to adjust out on the trail. I can't think of a better way to set it up exactly, but it's a little hard to justify the $700 price.
 

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Never used scales for a trail sled. I've always set my spring preload at 5 mm to start, and increased it from there if needed. Its way more important to choose the correct spring rate for the sled your woring with.
 

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How about a single scale with a remote display? There are quite a few options if you go that route.
You would need three blocks of the same height for the other points on the sled.

It would help you get to baseline measurements without going big bucks.
 

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There is a company here in Southern Ontario (Accelerated Technologies) that specializes in suspension setups/shocks and they use 4 pad scale to determine proper setup. They have been featured on some of the sled tv shows and various YouTube channels.
John has a video on their web page now explaining how they achieve proper weight distribution using the 4 pad

 

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I would like to hear thoughts and opinions about using a 4 pad set of scales to set the preload of the springs for my sleds. I have always considered the front track shock spring to be the most important setting for weight distribution, but it is a pain in the ass to adjust out on the trail. I can't think of a better way to set it up exactly, but it's a little hard to justify the $700 price.
I have 4 pad Intercomp Nascar scales which are excellant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys! I love to tinker with the sleds in my garage and I think the idea of dialing in my preload with precision might be too much to resist. Lol I think adjusting the shocks are generally the thing I want to focus on out on the trail based on riding conditions. Unfortunately I live in an area where there isn't always reliable snow so I am not able to just run out the back 40, bring it in and thaw, adjust and repeat until it's just the way I want.
 

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There is a company here in Southern Ontario (Accelerated Technologies) that specializes in suspension setups/shocks and they use 4 pad scale to determine proper setup. They have been featured on some of the sled tv shows and various YouTube channels.
John has a video on their web page now explaining how they achieve proper weight distribution using the 4 pad

i can't find that on their site......
 

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The only reason race sleds are scaled is for a baseline in case somthing bad happens.Same as a race car.The numbers are just used so that you record all of the changes after the race vehicle actually works.I can guaranty you that what works for one driver is totally wrong for the next.Testing and adjustment is what really counts.
 

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Their use of those scales is laughable to anybody that has a race car.I could point out numerous issues with what they are doing.
Save your money folks.
Please elaborate. I’ve never been to this shop personally, but have heard good things about them.
Saw video last year of guys at a mountain shop doing something similar.
 

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First of all,the scales need to be leveled and used in one place for repeatability.There is no way they are working correctly on a set of rollers.
The way they have them placed under the skis is also debatable.I would be inclined to center them on the spindles just for repeatability.Some might argue that they are placed centered on where the carbide placement is.
Lastly,there is no way that the sled could be “set up”without the rider sitting where they normally would be on the sled.
Ive owned and worked on race cars and race sleds for most of my life so believe me when I say there is no “correct” way to set up either one.It all comes down to adjusting for the driver preference.
Nothing beats testing and tuning when it comes right down to it.
If you know somebody that seems to have a good handling sled all the time you would be way farther ahead having them ride with you for a day and getting it dialed in.
As far as these guys talking about a “proper”setup….well maybe they should ask what YOU want the sled to do before making assumptions.Some people like a lot of weight in the center to make the sled more playful and easier to drive.If you want to be fast down a smooth trail or run fast over big moguls those are completely different setups.Its kind of the same as one size fits all clutch kits….they just dont work.
 

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Agreed they should all be level otherwise there’s no way to get accurate numbers.
I’ve read that part of their service is discussing the customers issues and what they are trying to achieve as you suggested. Set ups are not a one size fits all.
 

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Unless your a very competitive racer, imo your wasting your time, and money going through all this just to trail ride. You will never notice the difference unless the sled has a bunch of mismatched springs of different rates. Its way easy enough to just start with 5 mm of spring preload, and test. The sleds feel will tell you what small adjustments you need to make.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have 4 sleds with 2 teenagers and my wife. I was never thinking about using the scales with dollies, but just have each of them sit on their sleds while on the scales and make adjustments from there. If it was just my sled it would easy but i can't really jump on some one else's sled that weighs 90lbs less than me and tell them their ride is set up based on how it handles for me.
 

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Yep, riding someone's sled setup for a rider that weigh's 100 lbs more than you is impossible to tell what can be done to make it handle better for them. I ridden sleds of all different brands that had riders about the same weight and height as me. I've found not everyone likes the same ego's setup on the same sled either.
 

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First of all,the scales need to be leveled and used in one place for repeatability.There is no way they are working correctly on a set of rollers.
The way they have them placed under the skis is also debatable.I would be inclined to center them on the spindles just for repeatability.Some might argue that they are placed centered on where the carbide placement is.
Lastly,there is no way that the sled could be “set up”without the rider sitting where they normally would be on the sled.
Ive owned and worked on race cars and race sleds for most of my life so believe me when I say there is no “correct” way to set up either one.It all comes down to adjusting for the driver preference.
Nothing beats testing and tuning when it comes right down to it.
If you know somebody that seems to have a good handling sled all the time you would be way farther ahead having them ride with you for a day and getting it dialed in.
As far as these guys talking about a “proper”setup….well maybe they should ask what YOU want the sled to do before making assumptions.Some people like a lot of weight in the center to make the sled more playful and easier to drive.If you want to be fast down a smooth trail or run fast over big moguls those are completely different setups.Its kind of the same as one size fits all clutch kits….they just dont work.
Well a whole lot of assumptions are being made by just one picture of a sled on scales. Lol. I've been to Accelerated this year. John the owner came from a bike background. Raced Pro Superbike and then retired and worked for Factory Superbike Honda and Kawasaki and other places. Started his own business with bike suspensions and moved into sleds, SXS, atv's. He also develops for Elka. I think he may have an idea of what he's doing.

The first thing he asks is what you are looking to achieve. Big bump guy, ditchbanger, slow trail rider. 300 pounder, 125 pounder. You do a consult first. You get on the machine and then you get off. They take measurements. You get on the machine and then you get off. They take more measurements. Scales are but one tool to assist in them understanding how the sled has come into the shop and where they want to get to. By understanding the certain biases of each sled/manufacturer they can build a profile to work from. They certainly understand one size doesn't fit all.

There are hundreds of threads on HCS that discuss sag, darting, bottoming, pushing, etc. and hundreds of posters that haven't figured it out completely. If this group of what I would consider more hardcore sledders hasn't figured it all out completely then you can understand why people would be looking for help or just looking for a suspension package superior to OEM.
 
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