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Ok all have a 4 yr old grandchild that loves the outdoors and being with us. He has seen our sleds and is very curious. He has an electric tractor he runs the wheels off of and a bicycle the training wheels still on but are up. What would be a good first sled? A kitty Kay? A 120? He is tall for his age
thanks
 

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I started both my kids on an Indy Lite 340. Worked out really good, and is trail legal so they could transition smoothly from bombing around on the lake and field to actual trail riding. $ about the same as a clean 120, at least around here.
 

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Being 4, regardless of being tall or not ... a "mini" (120 class sled) is definitely the way to go. If he was a bit older, I'd agree with @Wantry but 4 is pretty young to be on a bigger sized sled.
 

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I started mine on an old snoscoot. Have to be willing to clean carbs to own one of those though.
 

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Ok all have a 4 yr old grandchild that loves the outdoors and being with us. He has seen our sleds and is very curious. He has an electric tractor he runs the wheels off of and a bicycle the training wheels still on but are up. What would be a good first sled? A kitty Kay? A 120? He is tall for his age
thanks
Thundercat. Just have tomcat turn the boost down a little. 👍
 

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My grandson last winter. He’s 3 1/2 years old at the time.

We tie a long ripe to tether and run along side the 120’s until they figure it out. We bought our 2nd 120 this past year.

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Lot of ways to bake a pie. Most of 'em turn out pretty alright!

The 340 platform of that era (mine is a '99) is about 3/4 size. The seat is low enough that even a short-for-age 5 year old can reach the boards and bars, but it's long enough that the kids' first few missions out, I could sit behind them with a helping hand on the controls. Once they can get out on their own in a big open space, pull one plug wire or zip tie a block between bar and throttle to keep exit velocity down at first. Once all the limiters are taken off, it's a legit 45-50 mph sled with legal lights. Just enough motor so the adults aren't slowed down too bad, enough suspension for a 100-lb kid to keep up on rough trail (as long as they have the physical fitness), and enough track to not have to dig it out every time it snows real hard.

Once Ben started to ride it on trail (that's him in front of me, in my avatar), he 3 good years out of the 340. I wound up rebuilding a couple things on it and eventually put an Xtra-10 skid in it, but overall it's been reliable and mostly trouble free. Better use of $1000 than a lot of other things I've spent money on. His next (and still) sled was a late model 600, which he rides the holy hell out of. The gate to move from little sled to big sled was having the strength to dig out and lift the back end of the big sled. He was 13 this sled season and frankly outrides most adults, in terms of keeping up on a long ride at a fast pace, problem-solving gotcha situations, trail navigation, and safety. I think his experience "growing up" and making mistakes with the same under-powered but big enough machine helped a lot.

I also think -- and like the above, this is my opinion only, take it for what it's worth -- that lots and lots of two up riding is as important or more important than what sled kids start on. Both mine went for a sled ride (sitting on my lap) as soon as they could walk. Both of them started going for frequent trail rides with me at 4. My son saw about 15K miles through my windshield and then over my shoulder, before he ever got anywhere near the trail on his own sled. My little girl's about halfway there. Watching Dad or Mom pilot through various situations, and then talking with them after about what they saw, is a great way for kids to see and learn from a lot of the things that can go right and wrong on a ride. Seeing a wreck or medivac first-hand is a lot better for a kid than being in either. So I have spent a lot more on two-up seats for my various sleds than I ever spent on the kids' 340. My .02.
 

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definitely suggest the 120. Do not bother with a Kitty cat, they have no clearance and can't travel off anything besides a packed track. My girls both started on a 120 before they were 3. My oldest is now 6 and she still rode the 120 and also a fair bit on a 340 Puma this past winter. I'm going to buy her a zr 200 for next winter tho as they are the perfect transition for her to stay happy and confident.
 
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