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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 04 xcsp600 and love the sled. What I don't like is the pps shock. It does not seem to have any dampening the first 4" or 5". Is a clicker that much better ? Also will a clicker bolt right in place of the pps ? Thanks , Marinetech
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
can you explain in what ways it is better ? Just want to be sure it is worth it. I have been considering putting my edge skid in my srx and buying a better skid for the xcsp , maybe a pro X skid ?
 

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The PPS is best suited for lighter riders and not too rough conditions. When pushed too hard, it starts to show its weakness. You can also have your PPS shock revalved and rebuilt to take out some of the bypass action.
 

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A lot of guys back off tension of front track spring and/or completely ignore the condition of front track shock. If youre front track shock is good and spring has an inch of preload, then the rear PPS works. Otherwise after a few bumps the skid is a low rider and can't recover proper height. Also less skid coupling may be fun for dangling skis but it destroys ride quality. I'd try the "free" skid adjustments before spending money on new shocks.
 

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I found the clicker to be VERY stiff. I needed to pinch it off and get the front end out of the equation to be comfortable in the g bumps. I like the ZERO Pro much better.
 

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good points from Thinksno, for the PPS to work like intended, the center spring/shock needs to be setup to take its share of the work. This means tighter coupling and need for more preload on the center shock.
 

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good points from Thinksno, for the PPS to work like intended, the center spring/shock needs to be setup to take its share of the work. This means tighter coupling and need for more preload on the center shock.[/b]
The PPS is going to demand everything from proper sag to coupling be set up specifically for it. That's the beauty of the clicker - it takes 90% of that out of the equation.

To understand the clicker, is to understand that only the top and bottom 1/3 of travel is dampened. The center 1/3 is not. You have to center your setup on that to take advantage of it.
 

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I put a clicker in and wouldn't go back. It's stiff, even on 3, but it's better than bottoming out or having a lowrider sled.
 

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i put a clicker in mine at 260 lbs.and only use #3 position.i was able to back off spring tension to low also.be ready on a hard hit cause they are FIRM.better than bottoming in my opinion.thats just me.hth
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So to have the preload set right on the front shock , undue it so its in a free state , back the spring off till its loose and screw it down 1" , is this correct ? everything in the skid is factory set except I moved the forward rollers for the springs back one hole cause it would bottom out to easy with the spring blocks in the middle setting and was to still at the max setting , thought maybe this would give me a happy medium , have not tried it yet
 

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So to have the preload set right on the front shock , undue it so its in a free state , back the spring off till its loose and screw it down 1" , is this correct ? everything in the skid is factory set except I moved the forward rollers for the springs back one hole cause it would bottom out to easy with the spring blocks in the middle setting and was to still at the max setting , thought maybe this would give me a happy medium , have not tried it yet[/b]
An inch of preload on the front skid spring will/can cause some pushing in the corners.

Try these settings, maybe use them for a reference when you've been messing around and forget where the heck your at. They're very easy to come back to, allowing a fresh start. Assuming the shocks have been recently rebuilt -

Start with no preload on the front skid spring and ski springs. Just enough to hold everything in place -

Teach the sled what you weigh- set your sag to about 3-4". Get it right. No cheating! It's the most important setting there is. We're setting the skid to run in that center 1/3 here. If you have trouble ask for a hand. Lots of ways to do this - using all stock parts. Weights from 100 to 300+

Set the FRSS in rear hole on low.

That leaves the RRSS for tweaking. Use it to control coupling - your anti bottoming adjustment. Don't move anthing else. Put it back in the second hole on low and give it a try. If you're bottoming too often, set it on high. Make BIG adjustments with the RRSS until you see what's going on (nothing else!). If you can't control the bottoming in the middle hole, move it to the front and start over. -Al
 
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