Hardcore Sledder banner

41 - 49 of 49 Posts

·
Premium Member
MY21 650 SBA 146, ES, ICE Storm 1.5
Joined
·
6,120 Posts
I have a feeling there will be more than a 1% gain, otherwise what is the point in going to a 2.52 pitch?
Do the math, compute the length of track movement in one revolution of the drive axle.
HINT: Teeth x Pitch = Track movement in one revolution.
Then take 22.68 and divide by 22.88 and tell me what percentage you get.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,091 Posts
I understand the math. But sometimes in the real world physics and other things that I can't explain take over and are bigger than the sum of the math. No I have no first hand proof or knowledge, but I stand behind my statement. Polaris would not stock different parts and go through it all for less than 1%. Just my opinion and you know what they say about opinions.
 

·
Premium Member
MY21 650 SBA 146, ES, ICE Storm 1.5
Joined
·
6,120 Posts
The distance/mph difference between a 9 tooth 2.52" pitch driver and an 8 tooth 2.86" pitch driver is less than 1%
My post was about distance/mph difference per drive axle revolution. Simple enough. Just math.

I understand the math. But sometimes in the real world physics and other things that I can't explain take over and are bigger than the sum of the math. No I have no first hand proof or knowledge, but I stand behind my statement. Polaris would not stock different parts and go through it all for less than 1%. Just my opinion and you know what they say about opinions.
The 2.52" pitch track, compared to a 2.86" pitch track in approximately the same length and style track (such as 136/137 in a 1.35" 2ply Cobra) has these advantages: 54 versus 48 panels or lugs. (12.5% more)
  • More panels to populate studs.
  • More lugs for traction.
  • More lugs w/reinforcing rods for strength
  • Shorter pitch: line of pull between windows on drive sprocket is more circular, more teeth to pull track, slightly less power loss.

It has the disadvantages of:
  • More windmill effect because of more lugs, some power loss.
  • More weight with 6 more lugs, more weight, more inertia to resist acceleration.
  • At this time, fewer choices in available tracks, since 2.86" has been very popular for a number of years on Flatland & Crossover sleds, and 2.52" has been less popular.
 
  • Like
Reactions: geez150

·
Registered
2020 Indy XCR 850
Joined
·
400 Posts
I was told a 136/2.52 has the same number of lugs on the snow as a 144/2.86. Best of both worlds? Maybe.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,091 Posts
I always under the impression that the 2.52 was faster vs. a 2.86, so that's why I figured they went to 2.52 was strictly on a performance standpoint.
 

·
Premium Member
MY21 650 SBA 146, ES, ICE Storm 1.5
Joined
·
6,120 Posts
I was told a 136/2.52 has the same number of lugs on the snow as a 144/2.86. Best of both worlds? Maybe.
No such track as a 144 / 2.86, so you were told wrong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
My 19/850 129" has 135/1.375" studs. Test drove 21/650 with 137" ice ripper track for a couple of hours. Part of that ride was on a snow packed side road. I had been on that road 2 weeks before with my 19/850. Of coarse on an open road with no traffic you punch it. The 850 hooks up big time and goes. The 650 with the 137" ice ripper just spins. Not even close to a fully studded track. I ordered my snowcheck with the Cobra track and will install 144/1.4" studs.
 
41 - 49 of 49 Posts
Top