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Keep in mind the 600 has an idle voltage a little higher of .95V+-.01. I had set mine to .94 and it was a little low, until I found the spec. I assume base voltage is the same though, but the manual does not state this. Can anyone confirm?
 

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Another thought is anyone running a pc5 can power up ecu and read through the power commander software to see where your at as well. I don't know enough about electricity and accuracy of pc5 readings verses a good multimeter but if the pc5 is the final piece playing with fueling the setting of tap only has to be as acurrate as the pc5 and when run through the ecu it eliminates the need to backprobe
 

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Another thought is anyone running a pc5 can power up ecu and read through the power commander software to see where your at as well. I don't know enough about electricity and accuracy of pc5 readings verses a good multimeter but if the pc5 is the final piece playing with fueling the setting of tap only has to be as acurrate as the pc5 and when run through the ecu it eliminates the need to backprobe
a power commander see's the very same readings as the d-wrench. you need to power your ecu with a fully charged battery for both. or you would have to run your sled. the sensor circuits are 5 volt reference. so any voltage run thought the regulator in the ecu for the sensor circuits reads the same out put.

back probing these is not a very good idea at all. just a bit of corrosion will cause all sorts of issues. the ecu see's voltage and frequency. so any wire damage will cause problems. do not back probe, cut, or stick any sensor circuit wire or you run the risk of a problem. do not add any length of take away any if fixing a wiring problem either. this will effect what the ecu see's and may take action like limp mode etc.

the only method of checking and or adjusting your tps is with a power commander or d-wrench. HCS members that have seen me do this have been amazed with the out come. and how much better there sled runs afterwards. we learned a lot about the effects of setting or changing the base voltage on these sleds and how it effects top end fueling.
 

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a power commander see's the very same readings as the d-wrench. you need to power your ecu with a fully charged battery for both. or you would have to run your sled. the sensor circuits are 5 volt reference. so any voltage run thought the regulator in the ecu for the sensor circuits reads the same out put.



back probing these is not a very good idea at all. just a bit of corrosion will cause all sorts of issues. the ecu see's voltage and frequency. so any wire damage will cause problems. do not back probe, cut, or stick any sensor circuit wire or you run the risk of a problem. do not add any length of take away any if fixing a wiring problem either. this will effect what the ecu see's and may take action like limp mode etc.



the only method of checking and or adjusting your tps is with a power commander or d-wrench. HCS members that have seen me do this have been amazed with the out come. and how much better there sled runs afterwards. we learned a lot about the effects of setting or changing the base voltage on these sleds and how it effects top end fueling.


Exactly get a pc5 and 12v to ecm pwr. Yesterday we had -30f two slow pulls to loosen things up and one good tank and we were running. 1 pull starts after that vforce3r idles 1700-1800
 

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a power commander see's the very same readings as the d-wrench. you need to power your ecu with a fully charged battery for both. or you would have to run your sled. the sensor circuits are 5 volt reference. so any voltage run thought the regulator in the ecu for the sensor circuits reads the same out put.

back probing these is not a very good idea at all. just a bit of corrosion will cause all sorts of issues. the ecu see's voltage and frequency. so any wire damage will cause problems. do not back probe, cut, or stick any sensor circuit wire or you run the risk of a problem. do not add any length of take away any if fixing a wiring problem either. this will effect what the ecu see's and may take action like limp mode etc.

the only method of checking and or adjusting your tps is with a power commander or d-wrench. HCS members that have seen me do this have been amazed with the out come. and how much better there sled runs afterwards. we learned a lot about the effects of setting or changing the base voltage on these sleds and how it effects top end fueling.
So, not only are we not supposed to back-probe anything, we aren't even supposed to fix a broken/chaffed wire? Are you suggesting we buy a new harness instead? Imho, adding a few inches of the same gauge of wire, properly soldered and sealed with heat-shrink tubing, will have no effect on any circuit on a snowmobile. The only time I would ever have a concern repairing a wire were if it were shielded. Then, my emphasis would be on maintaining the integrity of the shield after a repair. As for DW or a PCV being the only way to set a TPS, I respectfully disagree. The technique outlined in this post, if done correctly, is completely safe. I'm not compromising the wire or connection in any way. I slide my pins between the wire and seal and when I pull the pins out you can barely see where they where. The dab of silicon seals what there is for a hole. However, if I ever have to do this again I will pull the seal as Coastiepete suggested. I've done this to both my sleds and they both run great. Others have done this, as well, with good results. The thing is, I didn't invent this. The information was already out there. This isn't anything new and revolutionary. All I've done is share what I've learned and shared my experience. Not everybody wants to to take their sled to a dealer or independent shop and not everybody can afford a PCV for something they might do once or twice in the time they own their sled. You and I disagree on this. That's cool. It's not the first time, nor the last. :bc:
 

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So, I've got a 2012 Switchback Pro R 600. I've got the throttle cable disconnected at the throttle body. I bought a pig tail off of eBay and use a 9v Battery, the pig tail drops it to 5v. Using a fluke multimeter. When I first plugged it in, I was reading .975ish. I adjusted the TPS and got it close to .702. I've blipped the throttle body and it'll get up to .93-.94 when back, then drop and go between .703-.704, going back and forth. Is something wrong, or will I be okay? If fine, then when setting the idle voltage, do I leave the idle adjustment on the inline adjuster on the handle bars in a certain spot, or do I just not worry about it and set voltage with adjustment nuts at throttlebody?
 

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I was looking at the cable, wrong thing to adjust too. I found the idle screw. What B with an itch. Working on it outside in NW Alaska, no shop, fudge! I'll get it. Thanks for this post!
 

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I checked mine last night using my Power commander FC and my TPS was sitting at .973v. when idling. That's only off by 0.023-0.033 volts. Does that matter enough that it needs to be dealt with? Thanks.
 

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I have a 2013 voyager 600. At the beginning of the season i went to start the ride and it had idle issues. After reading post and other forums i thought the problem might be the tps. I followed the procedure above and i was able to get the voltage readings mentioned above after installing a previously used tps. When i went to fire it up again rhe idle was still of and engine wanting to shut off with the engi e lamp flashing. The exhaust manifold seemed to have little fuel not dripping but wet. How can i go about troubleshooting this. Im off the grid and the nearest dealer is 180mi over the water. Can anyone give me suggestions plz. 12 grand just sitting in my shop
 

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I checked mine last night using my Power commander FC and my TPS was sitting at .973v. when idling. That's only off by 0.023-0.033 volts. Does that matter enough that it needs to be dealt with? Thanks.


Did you end up adjusting it? Mine is off .023


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Would anyone be willing to post a picture of their TPS plug? I want to find the correct plugs to make the TPSTool.com tool work with snowmobiles, but I don't have a snowmobile available to me right now.
 

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Member 650brad was nice enough to write this up:buttrock:



In the harness, in the black bag just above the voltage regulator, there is a plug labeled ECM PWR. An orange wire (positive) and a brown wire (neg) run to this plug. Connect a fully charged 12v battery to this and it will power up the ECM. You can then back-probe the TPS. I used sharpened paper clips to back-probe and a digital meter. Loosen the throttle cable all the way, you might even want to disconnect it from the throttle body. Now, back off the idle adjustment screw until it no longer touches the adjustment lever. Blip the throttle lever a few times. Your throttle blades should now be completely closed and you are ready to make the first adjustment.
There are 3 wires at the TPS. Red/White is the supply voltage, Blue is the signal to the ECM and the Black/Dark Blue is ground. Hooking up the meter to the Red/White and the Black/Dark Blue will get you the sensor voltage. It should be very close to 5v. Mine was 5.02v. Switching your probe from the Red/White to the Blue will get you to your readings for adjustment. For your first reading you want to see .700v. This is very important. If it isn't at .700v you need to loosen the screws on the TPS and rotate it until you get it there. Tighten the screws, making sure your setting doesn't change. Blip the throttle a few time and make sure it returns to the same voltage. If all is well at this point you can now set the throttle opening. The recommended setting is .930v-.950v. I set mine in the middle, .940v. You need to adjust the idle screw to set this. It's a bit tricky because as you tighten the lock nut on the adjustment screw the setting will change. Once set, blip the throttle a few times and make sure the setting stays the same. Adjust your cable and you're done. Also, I put a dab of clear silicone over the probe holes on the TPS to keep moisture out.
I made my own power-up cable from some 18ga. wire and a couple of bigger alligator clamps. I bared 1/4" on the other end and gave the ends a touch of solder for plugging into the ECM PWR connector. One thing I did notice was that, having electric start and using the sled battery to power-up, I only had to use the positive side of my harness at the ECM PWR connector. The battery neg and the ECM ground are connected through the chassis so, no need to use the neg side of my harness but, you will have to hook it up without ES or if you use a battery besides the one in the sled.
As for the meter, use the best one you can afford. I see you are an electrician so, you probably have a good one already. I have a couple of DVM's for servicing tube guitar amps and my most expensive one was under $100 and it worked fine.
This is how I did mine and it runs great.
I made 2 jumper wires to eliminate probing. Jumped Supply Voltage Red/White and Ground Black/Blue at TPS Plug. Then used meter to check Sensor output at TPS plug. Worked great.
 

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Member 650brad was nice enough to write this up:buttrock:



In the harness, in the black bag just above the voltage regulator, there is a plug labeled ECM PWR. An orange wire (positive) and a brown wire (neg) run to this plug. Connect a fully charged 12v battery to this and it will power up the ECM. You can then back-probe the TPS. I used sharpened paper clips to back-probe and a digital meter. Loosen the throttle cable all the way, you might even want to disconnect it from the throttle body. Now, back off the idle adjustment screw until it no longer touches the adjustment lever. Blip the throttle lever a few times. Your throttle blades should now be completely closed and you are ready to make the first adjustment.
There are 3 wires at the TPS. Red/White is the supply voltage, Blue is the signal to the ECM and the Black/Dark Blue is ground. Hooking up the meter to the Red/White and the Black/Dark Blue will get you the sensor voltage. It should be very close to 5v. Mine was 5.02v. Switching your probe from the Red/White to the Blue will get you to your readings for adjustment. For your first reading you want to see .700v. This is very important. If it isn't at .700v you need to loosen the screws on the TPS and rotate it until you get it there. Tighten the screws, making sure your setting doesn't change. Blip the throttle a few time and make sure it returns to the same voltage. If all is well at this point you can now set the throttle opening. The recommended setting is .930v-.950v. I set mine in the middle, .940v. You need to adjust the idle screw to set this. It's a bit tricky because as you tighten the lock nut on the adjustment screw the setting will change. Once set, blip the throttle a few times and make sure the setting stays the same. Adjust your cable and you're done. Also, I put a dab of clear silicone over the probe holes on the TPS to keep moisture out.
I made my own power-up cable from some 18ga. wire and a couple of bigger alligator clamps. I bared 1/4" on the other end and gave the ends a touch of solder for plugging into the ECM PWR connector. One thing I did notice was that, having electric start and using the sled battery to power-up, I only had to use the positive side of my harness at the ECM PWR connector. The battery neg and the ECM ground are connected through the chassis so, no need to use the neg side of my harness but, you will have to hook it up without ES or if you use a battery besides the one in the sled.
As for the meter, use the best one you can afford. I see you are an electrician so, you probably have a good one already. I have a couple of DVM's for servicing tube guitar amps and my most expensive one was under $100 and it worked fine.
This is how I did mine and it runs great.
good job. has all the details for fast easy work.
 
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