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Member 650brad was nice enough to write this up:buttrock:



In the harness, in the black bag just above the voltage regulator, there is a plug labeled ECM PWR. An orange wire (positive) and a brown wire (neg) run to this plug. Connect a fully charged 12v battery to this and it will power up the ECM. You can then back-probe the TPS. I used sharpened paper clips to back-probe and a digital meter. Loosen the throttle cable all the way, you might even want to disconnect it from the throttle body. Now, back off the idle adjustment screw until it no longer touches the adjustment lever. Blip the throttle lever a few times. Your throttle blades should now be completely closed and you are ready to make the first adjustment.
There are 3 wires at the TPS. Red/White is the supply voltage, Blue is the signal to the ECM and the Black/Dark Blue is ground. Hooking up the meter to the Red/White and the Black/Dark Blue will get you the sensor voltage. It should be very close to 5v. Mine was 5.02v. Switching your probe from the Red/White to the Blue will get you to your readings for adjustment. For your first reading you want to see .700v. This is very important. If it isn't at .700v you need to loosen the screws on the TPS and rotate it until you get it there. Tighten the screws, making sure your setting doesn't change. Blip the throttle a few time and make sure it returns to the same voltage. If all is well at this point you can now set the throttle opening. The recommended setting is .930v-.950v. I set mine in the middle, .940v. You need to adjust the idle screw to set this. It's a bit tricky because as you tighten the lock nut on the adjustment screw the setting will change. Once set, blip the throttle a few times and make sure the setting stays the same. Adjust your cable and you're done. Also, I put a dab of clear silicone over the probe holes on the TPS to keep moisture out.
I made my own power-up cable from some 18ga. wire and a couple of bigger alligator clamps. I bared 1/4" on the other end and gave the ends a touch of solder for plugging into the ECM PWR connector. One thing I did notice was that, having electric start and using the sled battery to power-up, I only had to use the positive side of my harness at the ECM PWR connector. The battery neg and the ECM ground are connected through the chassis so, no need to use the neg side of my harness but, you will have to hook it up without ES or if you use a battery besides the one in the sled.
As for the meter, use the best one you can afford. I see you are an electrician so, you probably have a good one already. I have a couple of DVM's for servicing tube guitar amps and my most expensive one was under $100 and it worked fine.
This is how I did mine and it runs great.
 
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Member 650brad was nice enough to write this up:buttrock:



In the harness, in the black bag just above the voltage regulator, there is a plug labeled ECM PWR. An orange wire (positive) and a brown wire (neg) run to this plug. Connect a fully charged 12v battery to this and it will power up the ECM. You can then back-probe the TPS. I used sharpened paper clips to back-probe and a digital meter. Loosen the throttle cable all the way, you might even want to disconnect it from the throttle body. Now, back off the idle adjustment screw until it no longer touches the adjustment lever. Blip the throttle lever a few times. Your throttle blades should now be completely closed and you are ready to make the first adjustment.
There are 3 wires at the TPS. Red/White is the supply voltage, Blue is the signal to the ECM and the Black/Dark Blue is ground. Hooking up the meter to the Red/White and the Black/Dark Blue will get you the sensor voltage. It should be very close to 5v. Mine was 5.02v. Switching your probe from the Red/White to the Blue will get you to your readings for adjustment. For your first reading you want to see .700v. This is very important. If it isn't at .700v you need to loosen the screws on the TPS and rotate it until you get it there. Tighten the screws, making sure your setting doesn't change. Blip the throttle a few time and make sure it returns to the same voltage. If all is well at this point you can now set the throttle opening. The recommended setting is .930v-.950v. I set mine in the middle, .940v. You need to adjust the idle screw to set this. It's a bit tricky because as you tighten the lock nut on the adjustment screw the setting will change. Once set, blip the throttle a few times and make sure the setting stays the same. Adjust your cable and you're done. Also, I put a dab of clear silicone over the probe holes on the TPS to keep moisture out.
I made my own power-up cable from some 18ga. wire and a couple of bigger alligator clamps. I bared 1/4" on the other end and gave the ends a touch of solder for plugging into the ECM PWR connector. One thing I did notice was that, having electric start and using the sled battery to power-up, I only had to use the positive side of my harness at the ECM PWR connector. The battery neg and the ECM ground are connected through the chassis so, no need to use the neg side of my harness but, you will have to hook it up without ES or if you use a battery besides the one in the sled.
As for the meter, use the best one you can afford. I see you are an electrician so, you probably have a good one already. I have a couple of DVM's for servicing tube guitar amps and my most expensive one was under $100 and it worked fine.
This is how I did mine and it runs great.
that's all well and good except you should not be back probing any 5 volt circuit especially the already prone to moisture issue tps sensor. any water or corrosion here is going to spell trouble done the road.

not trying to discredit this but I see this stuff everyday from real world experience.
 

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that's all well and good except you should not be back probing any 5 volt circuit especially the already prone to moisture issue tps sensor. any water or corrosion here is going to spell trouble done the road.

not trying to discredit this but I see this stuff everyday from real world experience.
I use safety pins(very small hole) and then cover the area with a marine adhesive/sealant. No issues :thumbsup:
 

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Hey, I just realized that a post I made was made into a sticky! Cool! Thanks, HSR.

Any chance we could get a how to video? For the visual learners...
Sorry, I didn't do a video but, I recently bought a new, more accurate DDM and checked my TPS with it and took some pics. I'll try to get them up in the next few days.

Thank you for this!! You gotta be a contortionist to complete it with out tearing apart half the sled, but I got it done!!
I guess that I should have mentioned about getting to the TPS in my original post. I pull the belt guard and secondary. Much easier but, cool that you got it done.
 

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that's all well and good except you should not be back probing any 5 volt circuit especially the already prone to moisture issue tps sensor. any water or corrosion here is going to spell trouble done the road.

not trying to discredit this but I see this stuff everyday from real world experience.
I don't see the problem with back-probing anything, let alone a 5v sensor. It's done every day. That's why they sell back probe pins for DMM's. I agree about moisture causing problems but, sealing the probe holes with silicone is a reasonable way to prevent moisture intrusion. Like you, this isn't my first rodeo.
 

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OK, here's some pics. But, first, a disclaimer.
If you don't have the mechanical aptitude, if you don't understand the concept and/or you don't have the proper tools DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS!!! Severe engine damage can occur. This is for experienced tinkerers only. If you have any doubts as to your ability to do this please take your sled to a dealer or an experienced independent mechanic.

To get to the TPS I prefer to remove the belt guard and secondary. This gives you unrestricted access.

20151230_151643.jpg

I use small paper clips, sharpened, to back-probe the TPS but, you could use safety pins or something similar. There are also dedicated back-probe pins you can buy. You may need pliers to get them in deep enough to make contact.

20151230_152808.jpg

I used a set of hook clips to make my connection to my meter.

20151230_153452.jpg
20151230_153636.jpg
 

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In the black bag, above the primary clutch, you'll find the connector to power up the ECM. Connect a full charged 12v battery here. Orange is the positive wire.

20151230_151809.jpg

You should now be able to see what your current idle voltage is.

20151230_154539.jpg

To set your base voltage you need to completely loosen off your throttle cable adjuster and even remove the cable from the throttle body, if you prefer. I left mine hooked up. You will then need to completely back off the idle adjustment screw.

20151230_155208.jpg

You should now see your base voltage.

20151230_160546.jpg
 

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You want to have this base voltage as close to .700v as possible.Loosen the two screws holding the TPS and gently rotate it until you get the desired voltage. It's quite sensitive and doesn't take much movement to make big changes. It will probably change when you tighten the screws so, it may take a bit to get it right. Be patient.

20151230_162210.jpg

Blip the throttle a few times and make sure the reading returns to the same place. If you're happy, at this point you need to set the idle voltage. The service manual has the spec at.930v-.950v. Turn the idle set screw in to adjust this. I set mine in the middle. This is a tricky one because as you tighten the lock nut on the set screw your reading will change. Again, be patient and you'll get it. Blip the throttle and make sure it returns to the same reading.

20151230_171759.jpg

If you are happy, at this point, you are done making adjustments to the TPS. Disconnect the battery and meter, pull your probes and give the holes a dab of silicone. Adjust your throttle cable and reassemble everything else.
 

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Hey, I didn't need to back probe my TPS. I was able to pull my plug seals out with tweezers. The flat ones so I wouldn't damage them. Then it was easy to get my fluke probes in there.
 

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I guess that I should have mentioned about getting to the TPS in my original post. I pull the belt guard and secondary. Much easier but, cool that you got it done.
The TPS was easy, it was messing with the idle screw that was a B!TCH. LOL Was turned around facing away from the sled using my left hand.
 

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Hey, I didn't need to back probe my TPS. I was able to pull my plug seals out with tweezers. The flat ones so I wouldn't damage them. Then it was easy to get my fluke probes in there.
I thought about that and wish I would have done it. I didn't use silicone, just loaded the top side of the plug with Fluid Film.
 

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They use a similar plug seal as what I have in my marine connector kits at work. Easy to slide them up the wire a little to expose the pin.
 

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thanks brad for taking the time to take pics and wrote the directions!
i do however agree very adamantly with rick on not putting a hole in the wire. if you can slide the rubber seal up the wire, or slip a needle under the seal without tearing it, i could live with that, but i have seen too many problems caused by poked wires.

if anyone wants to borrow a pigtail to test, they can borrow mine after i get it, just give me a deposit and i will send it back when i get the pigtail back

the wire in the pic below was very time consuming to diagnose and find
if this happened a few months after you purchased a vehicle, who would want to pay for 7 plus hours of labor for the above diagnose and repair
ImageUploadedBySM Free1456274106.052184.jpg
 

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thanks brad for taking the time to take pics and wrote the directions!
i do however agree very adamantly with rick on not putting a hole in the wire. if you can slide the rubber seal up the wire, or slip a needle under the seal without tearing it, i could live with that, but i have seen too many problems caused by poked wires.

if anyone wants to borrow a pigtail to test, they can borrow mine after i get it, just give me a deposit and i will send it back when i get the pigtail back

the wire in the pic below was very time consuming to diagnose and find
if this happened a few months after you purchased a vehicle, who would want to pay for 7 plus hours of labor for the above diagnose and repair
View attachment 1629538
I'm not putting a hole in the wire. I'm sliding the probe between the wire and the seal. Slide it in far enough and it will make contact with the metal connector inside the plug.
 
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