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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got an 02 ZL SS with a frankenstein rear suspension. The rear skid springs are brand new .452 diameter 70 degree springs (the springs that some people call the fat-boy springs) with a fox shock valved to ZR specs. The front skid spring is a 190lb ZR CC spring with the adjustable ZR CC shock.

I weight 250. When I stand on the sled, it quickly sinks until the rear arm hits the coupling blocks. From that point on, thanks to the stiff front arm spring, it then gets harder to compress. My dad only weighs 200 and the sled sinks right to the coupler blocks when he stands on it too.

In the car world it's the springs that keep the car up, not the shocks, but the sled shocks seem to play a role in keeping things where they belong. I've already got brand new springs on the rear skid, a freshly rebuilt front skid shock, and a rear skid shock with only a few hundred miles on it, but something in the rear skid is obviously way too soft.

When I ride the sled, it rides very firm, presumably because the rear skid is already riding on the coupler blocks.

Any suggestions?
 

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Sound only sink a couple inches depending on your weight
 

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I don't even consider ride ht either off or on the sled when setting mine up...............start off on the lowest spring setting and adjust till it bottoms on the larger bumps........good to go. If it doesn't bottom the odd time yer waaaaaaaaay toooooo stiff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
the thing is, right now I seem to have a huge imbalance between the front skid and rear skid. The front skid is very firm, and the rear skid is very soft even with the heavier springs. I would like a balance. If I were to remove the coupling blocks the rear would probably bottom out constantly, with the front skid never bottomming.
 

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With the blocks out the .452 / 70 springs should be fine for a rider up to 225 or so but for a heavier rider you'll need a .460 / 75 or 70 set.
How much preload do you have on the front shock spring? Suggest you support the rear end / spin the spring till it's just starts to rattle then snug about a 1/2 turn and try it there.
 

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something sounds wrong there. i just put .452's in mine, and i weigh 240. it compresses maybe two inches when i sit on it, and i don;t have any coupler blocks in mine at all.
 

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Which set of holes do you have the rear scissor mounted in? Mine are the second and it is set for a 180 lb. rider. I don't remember which set of holes makes the rear of the suspension stand up more.

Is it possible that the scissor is collapsing in the wrong direction?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I moved the rear arm back to the stock hole. When the suspension was softer I had it 1 hole back to try and compensate for the softer settings. I upgraded the shocks and springs in hopes of being able to restore the stock geometry.

Now, here's the odd part. When I was out riding yesterday, I sat on the sled up in the woods and it only sank an inch or two... much more like what I'd expect. The skid seemed to work well most of the day until the front skid shock compressed and wouldn't rebound, causing the rear of the track to be the only contact point with the ground until I sat on it. I'm in the process of changing the front skid shock, so I'll have to revisit the spring issue after I get the new shock in. It might be an issue of still needing some adjustment to get some of the weight onto the front of the skid instead of having it all on the back.

One thing that makes me wonder what role the shocks play in ride height is how my Crossfire reacts. My crossfire has smaller rear skid springs than what I have put onto my ZL SS, and the front skid spring is pretty similar in rate. When I sit on that sled it doesn't squat at all. Whether I'm on the sled or not, it retains it's unloaded ride height. Yet my ZL SS, with stiffer springs (and the preload turned up), squats all the way to the coupler blocks.
 

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Here's my 2 cents from my experience with my own sled: The reason your suspension is sinking down the blocks is because your limiter straps too tight OR your front-end ride height is too high. My guess is the limiter straps are too tight.

When you tighten the straps you're taking pressure off the front of skid, placing more pressure on the skis. The problem is, people like to tighten them so much they pull the front of the skid up too far (off the ground) and it goofs up the geometry of the sled. So, if you have the sled sitting on flat ground, you'll see the front of the skid off the ground. Pushing down on the rear bumper will collapse the rear of the suspension to the point the front of the skid is back on the ground OR to the coupler blocks (whichever comes first). The suspension is not being allowed to work as it should.

Here's little test. Lay a 2x4 flat and place it under the front of the skid. Now try to push down on the rear bumper. My guess is the suspension will now work as it should and you won't be able to push down on the rear.

I know, I know, loosening the straps takes away ski pressure and handling. You can also adjust ski pressure with the front skid shock spring and with the front ski springs. My straps have slack in them and my ZR corners VERY flat and precise.

SO - put your rear arm back to the stock location, loosen your front skid shock spring and loosen dem straps!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
when I tightened the straps, I tightened them just enough so that they were snug with the shock fully extended. The last thing I want is too much ski pressure with this sled... I've battled that problem for years.

However, after riding I noticed that my new ZR CC shock was compressed an inch and a half, causing the front of the skid to sit off the snow just like you described. However, I don't think it was like that prior to my ride when I first started complaining about the soft suspension.

But, for now I need to get my old shock back into the front of the skid to eliminate that issue, then revisit this one if it still exists.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Just to provide an update incase somebody searches this thread down the road, I believe that I've fixed my problem. That compressed front shock must have had issues right from the get-go that I just didn't identify until I was out on the trail. With the other shock back in the front skid, the skid now sits level on the floor, and the suspension only sinks a couple inches when I sit on it. It feels much firmer, and rides much better in the bumps.
 

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Just to provide an update incase somebody searches this thread down the road, I believe that I've fixed my problem. That compressed front shock must have had issues right from the get-go that I just didn't identify until I was out on the trail. With the other shock back in the front skid, the skid now sits level on the floor, and the suspension only sinks a couple inches when I sit on it. It feels much firmer, and rides much better in the bumps.[/b]
So jim was the problem that cc front shock with the dial to adjust the height of the shock. Did you buy it new off ebay from country cat. Just wondering cause i bought the same shock and i'm expecting the same problem, but it has worked great so far. Just had to get it charged with nitrogen, oil was good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I bought it from somebody here on HCS who apparently bought it on ebay, but he can't remember who from. He told me that it had a fresh rebuild and was not yet installed since that rebuild. It looked great when I received it, but it managed to fail after only a few miles of use, and now the seller isn't really being too helpful.
 
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