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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone!

This is my first post on the forum. I've been reading all the concerns and praises that people have been having in regards to their f-cats. Long story short, first ride this weekend (red f-7 snopro) and no engine problems whatsoever (knock on wood!) I and two other f-cats rode approx. 25 miles and this machine is scary fast! My only concern (on my first introduction) to this beast is is the handling issue, it tipped with no warning whatsoever! Don't get me wrong, I understand the need to "drive this sled" rather than ride it , but it was a bit unnerving to find myself doing my best impression of superman when running the lake this weeknd. I can under stand the possibility of this on tight trails, but not on a sweeping gradual corner at about 60mph. I definately didn't expect the ensuing 250yd slide on my rear end. Any other ideas on keeping the front end where its supposed to be?(That would be, on or closer to the ground). Or, I guess the real question is; How long did it take to get the feel of the sled? I'm not new to sledding by any means, but my suprise introduction to frozen water has caused some" trusting the sled "issues. I'm from Minnesota, and snow is really scarce right now, so I'm wondering if I'll see an improvement when there is a better snowpack.

-- Springs set 1/3 from top of shock, rear blocks set at #2, studded, and 10" carbides.

-- Any input would be appreciated> Shainsaw
 

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I had the same problem with my first ride. (F-5 reg) Sled will lift the ski for no reason. I was able to drive in varing conditions, I had to hang way off the sled and still i got the feeling that the sleds inside ski still wanted to come up. I will adjust the blocks to the 3 position and suck up the limiter strap up and see if this will help. To much transfer, Couldn't hit the throttle until almost all the way out of the corner or the sled would push. I have 102 1.175 60deg woodys and stock carbides. I will be changing to 6 inch as soon as we have better conditions. A little adjust here and there and I think it will rock.
 

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Hey thanks for the reply! Let me know what happens after your adjustments. Actually, I'm hoping that it's because of lack of riding time. I originally thought it might just have been me, but I can't possibly lean any more inside or ride the tank, I don't have enough room. (My legs are too long!(6'3"). I also thought it was the 10" gripping too much, but my buddy was running stock (4") and was having as hard of a time getting a handle on the ski lift as I was. I'll post my findings as soon as I have more seat time and more concrete adjustment #'s
 

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You have to sit close to the gas tank and lean into the turn.
It is not tippy if you ride it this way.
 

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i put 80 miles on mine today and i have to say the sled cornered like it was on rails.it did not feel tippy at all to me.sled is awesome!!!!!!!1
 

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I put 50 miles on my F5 last Saturday and it went anywhere I wanted it to. However, I did notice it was a little assy in the corners. I'm putting 102 1.175 Woody's Golddiggers on this week. That should do the trick.
 

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When I first rode mine I noticed right away that it felt tippy compared to my ZRT. Now that I have 200 miles on it I know how to ride and drive it. You can not compare this sled to something you have ridden before. The more you ride it the better it feels.
 

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Shainsaw

Let me tell you once you get it on some real snow and get sometime into the sled you will be happy. This sled takes some milage to get used to the way it handles.
When I picked up my F7 the trails were about a 8 out of 10. I found that I was comming into the turns a little to hot would have to brake slide the ass and gun it. As you get used to the sled you will find that comfort zone that you had on your old sled. This is the only way you will get used to this sled. I have a 160 miles on the sled and I am now going to try changing the carbides to 8 inch...and I'll see how that goes..after that I might try changing the ski's. I will try readjusting the shocks.
Hope this helps a little.
Rick :wacko: :wacko: :wacko: :wacko: :wacko: :wacko:
 

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Shainsaw, I wonder if the 10 inch carbides may be the problem. I watched a buddy riding on a lake with 10 inchers. When
he would make a gradual turn, and encounter a bump, it would cause him to move the skis a little bit. As soon as that
happened, the carbides grabbed, one ski went in the air, and he got tossed off on his butt. I am thinking that maybe too
much carbide might be the problem. I may be off base, but I saw it happen. Just my theory.
 
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sounds like you need to sell the F7 and get a ZL 500 cause the F7 is an AGGRESIVE trail sled i havent had a lick of problems riing mine
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Originally posted by F7pride03@Dec 10 2002, 01:32 PM
sounds like you need to sell the F7 and get a ZL 500 cause the F7 is an AGGRESIVE trail sled i havent had a lick of problems riing mine
I do believe that is the reason that I bought an AGGRESSIVE trail sled. The only sticky point is that until I (and many others) get enough snow to ride on, it's kinda hard to get a good feel for the thing, right?

shainsaw
 

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If you are turning on the sled and have a STANDARD F7 with the stock setup. I'm saying stock based on my stock setup which is as follows:

Transfer blocks set to 1.
Springs set to light and medium (I weight 135 lbs)
Front springs have very little ski pressure. Like 1 and 1/2 turns from as wide as the spring would be when there is no weight on the sled. In other words 1 and 1/2 turns below spring contact point. This is how my sled was delivered.

With that setup, when you hit the throttle the skis will LIFT. Which is fun, a blast . . . and will help it eat bumps like nothing with the rear suspension. (Heck who needs a REV doing a up and down motorcross front and rear motion when the skis will go over the top of the moguls and the rear just flys over the bumps.) Anyway, hitting the throttle while the sled is turning and hitting a bump causes a more ski lift than I'm used to with the ZR600 I used to have. More like a lightweight 440 Sno-Pro than a ZR. The front end being light likes to rise up when you hit the throttle. This causes a change in riding styles. I coast a bit more through the curves and hit it harder on the straits. Kind of like riding a cross between a Sno-Pro and a T-Cat, hard to describe, but definately fun.

Now if I want to change this I can do it by doing three things.

1. Set transfer blocks to 2 or 3. This will make it rail more.
2. Increase ski pressure on front skis by increasing the spring pressure.
3. pull up the front end of the skid via limit strap adjustment.

Also setting the rear springs a bit stiffer (both sides to medium) may help some and I bottomed out once on the last 120 mile ride, so this may be a possibility.

These things will make the sled ride more like a ZR in carving.

As far as controlling the sled in turns by leaning and moving forward (still on the seat, only half my butt on the front of the seat) seemed to let me carve the turns a lot faster and with only one ski on the ground when running fairly agressive. I'm not usually happy to have inside ski lift and would rather back off on the throttle a bit and reduce ski lift on sharp turns anyway.

I'm the kind of guy who goes into turns coasting and hitting the throttle coming out. I rarely use the brake (even for stopping) I usually coast to a stop. This is my own particular style. When I use the brake its for rare emergencies and sometimes at stop signs a bit. (My brakes last seemingly forever.)

My point is, there are many ways to setup the suspension on these to get whatever feel you want. If you want to show off in a field and do wheelies, you can take off the transfer blocks. (Just don't go trail riding with it that way.) If you want to rail set the transfer blocks to 2 or 3 and adjust spring and preload or limit straps on the rear skid.

The sled is awesome. A little weight input goes a LONG WAY. (I'm a light rider and I can get good response from not a lot of weight shift).

The Firecat is definately the BEST sled I have ever been on.

I'll never want to ride a ZR or T-Cat again.

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Originally posted by ATOMICAT@Dec 10 2002, 04:51 PM
If you are turning on the sled and have a STANDARD F7 with the stock setup.  I'm saying stock based on my stock setup which is as follows:

Transfer blocks set to 1.
Springs set to light and medium (I weight 135 lbs)
Front springs have very little ski pressure.  Like 1 and 1/2 turns from as wide as the spring would be when there is no weight on the sled.  In other words 1 and 1/2 turns below spring contact point.  This is how my sled was delivered.

With that setup, when you hit the throttle the skis will LIFT.  Which is fun, a blast . . . and will help it eat bumps like nothing with the rear suspension.  (Heck who needs a REV doing a up and down motorcross front and rear motion when the skis will go over the top of the moguls and the rear just flys over the bumps.)  Anyway, hitting the throttle while the sled is turning and hitting a bump causes a more ski lift than I'm used to with the ZR600 I used to have.  More like a lightweight 440 Sno-Pro than a ZR.  The front end being light likes to rise up when you hit the throttle.  This causes a change in riding styles.  I coast a bit more through the curves and hit it harder on the straits.  Kind of like riding a cross between a Sno-Pro and a T-Cat, hard to describe, but definately fun.

Now if I want to change this I can do it by doing three things.  

1. Set transfer blocks to 2 or 3.  This will make it rail more.
2. Increase ski pressure on front skis by increasing the spring pressure.
3. pull up the front end of the skid via limit strap adjustment.

Also setting the rear springs a bit stiffer (both sides to medium) may help some and I bottomed out once on the last 120 mile ride, so this may be a possibility.

These things will make the sled ride more like a ZR in carving.

As far as controlling the sled in turns by leaning and moving forward (still on the seat, only half my butt on the front of the seat) seemed to let me carve the turns a lot faster and with only one ski on the ground when running fairly agressive.  I'm not usually happy to have inside ski lift and would rather back off on the throttle a bit and reduce ski lift on sharp turns anyway.  

I'm the kind of guy who goes into turns coasting and hitting the throttle coming out.  I rarely use the brake (even for stopping)  I usually coast to a stop.  This is my own particular style.  When I use the brake its for rare emergencies and sometimes at stop signs a bit.  (My brakes last seemingly forever.)

My point is, there are many ways to setup the suspension on these to get whatever feel you want.  If you want to show off in a field and do wheelies, you can take off the transfer blocks.  (Just don't go trail riding with it that way.)  If you want to rail set the transfer blocks to 2 or 3 and adjust spring and preload or limit straps on the rear skid.  

The sled is awesome.  A little weight input goes a LONG WAY.  (I'm a light rider and I can get good response from not a lot of weight shift).

The Firecat is definately the BEST sled I have ever been on.

I'll never want to ride a ZR or T-Cat again.

Greg
Greg-

Looks like you've been thinking about this a while! All I know is that you've given me some things to think about. The only difference between you and I is that I have a snopro, and you actually have been able to spend enough time in the seat to figure all this fun stuff out. All I know is I'm jealous!!! Thanks for the thoughts!

Shainsaw
 
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