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Discussion Starter #1
went to the u-p this weekend,had a real blast but not without some problems,first had my sled to dealer for oil pump update, 2 days before the trip,well they didn't get the rod on so i went through 32 ounces of oil in 26 miles,second could not steer sled in corners to save my soul,third darting was to say the least terrible,i regret setting it up according to some of the set-ups in this room,also the sled was bouncing so bad that i could not see the trail in the dark,,
so anyway i choke out the trip and proceed to have fun anyways,so i get home on tues night,and decide to look my sled over,,i found that my forward skid shock is tightened all the way up,, zero threads on the inside and about 3 inches to the bottom,,my question is can this cause all the problems above,, :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
 

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This sled wasn't setup at factore very well. I believe It's not an average guy sled. If you don't want to play with it buy Polaris or Skidoo.

All the more sleds I'll be able to blow away....
 

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I wonder how many of the people who are having all of these problems read the manual and followed its instructions. I bet that would answer a lot of questions to why certain people are having all the problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
not to be a smart ass kodiakman but the manual says and i quote,the skid frame front arm shock spring is adjustable.however arctic cat recommends that the shock spring be maintained at the factory setting.or that the shock spring be maintained as loose as possible.tightening the skid frame shock spring may ruin the handling features of the snowmobile,,since i'm not a cat technician i have no clue what the factory settings are,,further more i asked the question because i don't have the experience with snowmobiles that a lot of the people have in this room,, and i was making an observation as to what i found and wanted to reassure myself that this could be the problem,
also if you have read the numerous posts of handling in this room you would know theres more to the handling issues than the skid shock,,


thanks northeaster for your help,,
 

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mike,.......have you road the sled after making the adjustment's??
if so did you notice any improvements??
it took me a couple of times to get mine where i ,
wanted it. mark.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
mark i just got back from mi,thats when i got the chance to actually ride it on the trails,not much snow here in minnesota,i have not had a chance to ride it but i turned the skid shock spring down till it was loose and tightened it up about 2 turns will try it on the lake tommorrow if there is any snow left,supposed to be about 50 degrees tommorow
mike

ps nhpatriot are you crazy you should have seen all the poo and doo boys stare, when they see an f7
i did not say i don't like my sled i just need to play with it to get it right :rolleyes:
 

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2021 VR1 850, 18 Tiger 8000, 17 RS 6000, 16 ZR 6000, 12 F1100T, 11 EXT 800, 09 Z1 Turbo, 05 ZR 900
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The adjustment you made will make a huge difference, your sled must have been like grasshopper. Note the front skid shock is the axis point for the whole sled,
 

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Also, I found it critical to have the shocks in the front suspension to be as tight as possible. I'm a light guy, and with the weight of my body and the snowmobile, the sled had way too much body roll in the corners which would cause a ski to lift as well as bad pushing in the corners. To remedy this, simply tighten up the front end--the ride will be a little stiffer, but you will be able to corner like you can't believe.
 

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Rocket190, are you on a std or a sno-pro F7? If std, I agree 100% in that the front ski spring tension needs to be tightened up a bit. Mine were set stock with 2 1/2" threads showing, and I've been happily running them at 2 3/4", but just recently set them at 3" and it's even better yet -- less chassis roll, more responsive steering, and easier steering in that you don't have to lean quite as much to compensate for the excessive body roll that was present at loose spring settings. I weigh 140 lbs, front skid spring at 1/8" threads showing, rear torsion springs on #3/stiffest, no coupler blocks, Stud Boy 9" Shaper bars.

Just turned 3700 miles last night on my std F7 -- ZERO problems (well, did foul a plug the other night for some reason) and the best riding, handling, quickest, fastest, most fun sled I've ever had! -- Roy
 

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Discussion Starter #11
thanks alot guys for the info,this is my first new sled,all my other sleds were used and already set up,
thanks again mike,,
 

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Reading some of the posts recommending tightening up springs is unbelievable. Stock, this sled is for cruisers never venturing off of groomed trails. Rebound is already ridicously too fast, therefore tightening up the springs will create a pogo stick ready to bounce you to the moon over any type of bumps. Many of you are going the wrong way on set ups. You got to stiffen the dampening and slow down the rebound, and go to lighter spings on the front (I went to 60 psi; same springs I used when I raced x-country) if you're into agressive x-country riding. Also, lose the coupler blocks. All this keeps you on the ground. Can't accelerate in the air. Anyone who races or raced x-country will agree with this, and won't question the lighter front springs. Anyone bashing this set up- come up to Thunder Bay and compare sleds. I can nail junk full throttle, and have a sled that is planted firmly on the ground.
 
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