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Thats maybe what you think now! Until you start having crank seals go to hell on you when you are 20 to 100 miles from home on your sled and the motor is seized up. cause the ethanol dried out your seals!!
I AGREE! It's not good for anything imo. I've seen to many carbs screwed up from that crap. I just cleaned 3 different motorcycle carbs, 2 Harley, and a honda goldwing. The owner told me all of the bikes got NONE ETHANOL. They sat for 10 years, none of the carbs were dirty. The fuel was brown, and smelled bad, but I repeat none of the carbs were dirty. That was the best test I've ever had on none ethanol use. I feel it wasn't meant to be put in our engines, and I will never put it in my sleds, or cars. Not to mention it attracts moisture, not good for sure in a 2 stroke engine that sits in most areas for 8 months.
Even if you fog.
 

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There is a well known performance business in this sport that, after seeing a sizable increase in engine failure on performance sleds, started to test fuel that was advertised as being 90 or more Eth free gas. Also Checked octane at regular pumps.
Not sure if its station owner, truck drivers, or suppliers but it seems maybe we really shouldn't trust anything printed on the pump anymore
I agree with you bob.
I don't trust what the pump says. I wish ethanol never was introduced. 2 strokes should never get ethanol. Just my opinion.:wall:
I've been a small engine mechanic for over 30 years, and cleaned more carbs than I could count. I see what it does first hand.
 

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Good idea to check your gas for to much ethenol! I'm wondering if there is such a tester for bad gas(old gas)! I went out of my way to put non ethenol gas in my sled the last two seasons and have had nothing but problems! I think this coming season its getting whatever is fresh.
I have been following gas related engine failures on two stroke sleds for roughly 7 years from mostly DooTalk and my own experience. I don't mean just reading, but contacting the individual owners to get the full story.

What I found has led me to believe there is a disadvantage when choosing a fuel grade that is higher than necessary and has a lower turn-over. There seems to be a time of the year when it is worst which coincides with the beginning of the snowmobile season.

Along the snow belt there is a dead period between the time performance cars and boats get put away in storage and the beginning of the snowmobile season. This is the time that high test 93/94 octane is least used and sits longer in the underground tanks.

In my neck of the woods we don't have the problem with the non Ethanol grade, first because we don't have it, and second, our 91 even though it shows that it can contain up to 10% is actually Ethanol free. So we get the best of both worlds with Ethanol free and high turnover.

I check our 87 and 91 several times a season with a similar device to be sure. The Ethanol content in the 87 actually varies from season to season between 5 to 7 percent.

The odd gas station in my area offers 93/94. Among our local group we have noticed the odd problem in our performance cars causing pinging/detonation, so we have learned through experience to avoid it in our cars and sleds.

While there are no absolutes, from my findings the minimum required octane with highest turnover fuel holds the advantage. Of course if you use 90/91 E10, it is a good idea to adjust your habits from storage to preseason maintenance. The gas sitting in the tank for 8 months is not the same as when it was fresh, and the injectors may have lost a few percentage in flow.

As a simple example, say bad luck has you fill the tank in December with fresh gas that happens to contain 15% Ethanol, and the injectors are flowing 94% on the pto side and 97% on the mag. The pto side will be running a lot hotter. The cleaning detergents in the fresh might not have the time to clean the injectors before the engine suffers a power loss from the pistons/rings running too hot. Then the engine failure is posted on a public forum with the big question, why did one side fail and not the other. Incidentally, in this example it is not clear which side would fail first.



I need to point out that in no way am I suggesting that E10 holds a lower risk. I am only referring to low vs high turnover fuel. Bad batches of E10 have been seen and destroyed engines.
 

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I AGREE! It's not good for anything imo. I've seen to many carbs screwed up from that crap. I just cleaned 3 different motorcycle carbs, 2 Harley, and a honda goldwing. The owner told me all of the bikes got NONE ETHANOL. They sat for 10 years, none of the carbs were dirty. The fuel was brown, and smelled bad, but I repeat none of the carbs were dirty. That was the best test I've ever had on none ethanol use. I feel it wasn't meant to be put in our engines, and I will never put it in my sleds, or cars. Not to mention it attracts moisture, not good for sure in a 2 stroke engine that sits in most areas for 8 months.
Even if you fog.
In my experience small engines get into trouble with Ethanol from long term storage, especially when no stabilizer is used.

With 91 E0 (E10 that measured Ethanol free), I find much of the same problems caused by varnish and dried-up diaphragms as E10 that has been treated.

Since most engines that come my way are ones that need service, I found a good way to work my biases was to keep track of the engines that ran flawlessly year after year. Most of those are fed E10, but those owners have developed preventive measures from bad experiences.
 

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Ive trained a lot of people to store their sleds with non ethanol gas and its greatly cut down the number of carbs I have to clean from year to year.The other problem with ethanol is that it destroys orings in carbs and is hard on fuel lines.
LL100 or some race fuels are also options that work well for storage.
 
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