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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sled in question is a 2018 ZR 8000

I pulled the rear suspension, removed the chaincase/oil-tank cover to clean and inspect the condition of the driveshaft bearings. Removal of these parts was fairly straightforward with one tip I believe is worth noting: IMHO, it's necessary to disconnect the oil-tank return line (top of tank near the filler cap) hose in order to obtain sufficient movement to swing the assembly out of the way. Before you do this, have a rubber cap/plug ready, because if you don't, you'll have an oily mess to deal with.

I think the brake caliper bearing was just beginning to spin on the driveshaft, even though the bearing doesn't seem to be noisy when I spin it by hand. I measured the driveshaft OD and the bearing surface is within 0.004" of new. I will simply replace the bearing.

In the process of gaining better access to the brake caliper, I chose to remove the secondary (driven) clutch. I'm glad I did so, because there's something rattling around inside of it which I will inspect and report back what I find. Further, I was very surprised to discover that with the secondary clutch removed from the jackshaft, I find the bearing (housed in the torque link) is noisy. I pulled the seal, packed the race with new grease and it's still noisy. It's so comforting to know that for a $15,000 sled we get $12 bearings made in china.

So, my questions:
(1) I think there are at least three different torque links used on the procross machines and I haven't yet dealt with removal of the bearing behind the driven clutch on a 2018. How is the bearing removed? In previous year models, I recall having to remove the primary clutch, remove the torque link from the engine crankcase, then remove the entire assembly (torque link and jackshaft) from the sled. I also remember it took a very large shop press to persuade the bearing to let go of the shaft. Is all of that still required for 2018+ machines?
(2) Related to #1, how does one free the jackshaft from the sled? I assume BOTH bearings, including the upper chaincase bearing need to come out and I'm not sure how to remove these bearings in this machine.
(3) While I'm at it, I probably should replace the lower chaincase bearing with an SKF, Timken or similar (vs the lovely oem peer china brand). Will I need an internal (pilot bearing) remover to remove the lower bearing from the chaincase? Can this be reasonably be accomplished with the chaincase in the sled, or do I need to remove it as well?
(4) Can anyone recommend decent bearing pullers and installers which work well in this application?

Many thanks.
 

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Sled in question is a 2018 ZR 8000

I pulled the rear suspension, removed the chaincase/oil-tank cover to clean and inspect the condition of the driveshaft bearings. Removal of these parts was fairly straightforward with one tip I believe is worth noting: IMHO, it's necessary to disconnect the oil-tank return line (top of tank near the filler cap) hose in order to obtain sufficient movement to swing the assembly out of the way. Before you do this, have a rubber cap/plug ready, because if you don't, you'll have an oily mess to deal with.

I think the brake caliper bearing was just beginning to spin on the driveshaft, even though the bearing doesn't seem to be noisy when I spin it by hand. I measured the driveshaft OD and the bearing surface is within 0.004" of new. I will simply replace the bearing.

In the process of gaining better access to the brake caliper, I chose to remove the secondary (driven) clutch. I'm glad I did so, because there's something rattling around inside of it which I will inspect and report back what I find. Further, I was very surprised to discover that with the secondary clutch removed from the jackshaft, I find the bearing (housed in the torque link) is noisy. I pulled the seal, packed the race with new grease and it's still noisy. It's so comforting to know that for a $15,000 sled we get $12 bearings made in china.

So, my questions:
(1) I think there are at least three different torque links used on the procross machines and I haven't yet dealt with removal of the bearing behind the driven clutch on a 2018. How is the bearing removed? In previous year models, I recall having to remove the primary clutch, remove the torque link from the engine crankcase, then remove the entire assembly (torque link and jackshaft) from the sled. I also remember it took a very large shop press to persuade the bearing to let go of the shaft. Is all of that still required for 2018+ machines?
(2) Related to #1, how does one free the jackshaft from the sled? I assume BOTH bearings, including the upper chaincase bearing need to come out and I'm not sure how to remove these bearings in this machine.
(3) While I'm at it, I probably should replace the lower chaincase bearing with an SKF, Timken or similar (vs the lovely oem peer china brand). Will I need an internal (pilot bearing) remover to remove the lower bearing from the chaincase? Can this be reasonably be accomplished with the chaincase in the sled, or do I need to remove it as well?
(4) Can anyone recommend decent bearing pullers and installers which work well in this application?

Many thanks.
I attached a list of the replacement bearings to use,and yes you are correct to stay away from the stock Chinese bearings.One vendor I had good luck with was Central Surplus, #585-617-3500 located in central NY. I ordered all new seals from Country Cat.
 

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No need to pull or hammer any of the bearings in the chaincase or on the sled. Heat the area around the bearing with a heat gun or torch (dont burn your sled) and the bearings will pretty much slide out. Freeze the bearing and heat where the bearing goes to install.


I know it shows a slide hammer in the video, but its not necessary
 

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What he said (No I did not watch the video, but I have changed all of those bearings, and there’s nothing hard about any of them. Remove the twisty slinky snap ring things, use a little heat, no special tools required)
 

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I can’t remember what year they changed the bolts that retain the aluminum piece that holds the jack shaft bearing behind the secondary clutch, years ago that piece was mounted on the front side of the torque link, then it got moved to the backside so you had to remove the torque link to get to the bolts, self-explanatory when you look at it, you won’t have any problem.
 

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is it necessary to replace the seals at the same time as well or no? I'm thinkin about replacing my bearings in my chaincase this summer/fall
 

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Also, is there a better brand bearing to order than oem, or just go with oem replacements?
 

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Check post #2 of this thread,for bearing recommendations,and-yes it makes sense to change the seals after all the labor to get the bearings upgraded.
Thanks. Anybody got a website for Central Surplus, I can't find them.
 

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In general mechanical terms, yes, I like to replace seals when replacing a bearing, But that being said on one of these sleds, I have never replaced a seal. Either they were not leaking, or they were not leaking and they were also not readily available. Obviously they had been leaking or had signs of damage I would’ve replaced them.
Actually I have replaced them twice, when replacing inner chain cases, because they come with seals already installed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks everyone!
It looks to me that the bolts holding the driven clutch bearing housing on the torque link are accessible without removing the torque link from the sled. However, what is not clear to me is that if I remove that bearing housing, can the bearing be removed from the jackshaft? -OR- must the torque link and jack shaft be completely removed from the machine in order to replace the PTO side bearing?
 

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Having done this job a couple times, here’s been my experience…. The stock Peer bearings and seals in the chaincase are just fine to use. Changing seals is easy on the top of the case but much more difficult on the bottom. While you can change the lower seal with the case in, it won’t be fun.

The upper jack shaft bearing on the clutch side can also be replaced with a stock Peer or upgrade. By the way, I use a razor blade to pop the seal once a year and add some grease in there. When changing the bearing, you can warm up the TCL housing and tap the shaft on the chaincase side and it should pop out of the TCL. You can also remove it as an assembly. I then bought a couple lengths of black iron pipe that just fit over the shaft to drive off the old bearing and install the new one once I had it on the work bench. Installing is tricky because you must keep the bearing from changing angles or it pops off the back seal when installing. As I recall, I installed the shaft and TCL as one assembly.

The bottom bearing in my opinion is most benefited with an upgrade to SKF or something higher quality because the seals are better. I’ve changed those without removing the brake lines from the caliper and used a heat gun to warm the bearing housing. Once warm enough the bearing comes right out. It may help to freeze the new bearing on the install.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Kevin, thanks for the additional information!
So does the bearing housing need to be un-bolted from the TCL, or can that stay bolted together and only heat is needed to remove the bearing?
Also, are you stating that the radial seal of the bearing pops off of the bearing, if one tries to install it with the TCL mounted in the sled? I can't immediately understand what causes the seal to pop loose.
 

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The inner race of the bearings pivot. When they pivot, they pop the seal out. No big deal at all, just pop it back in. None of the bearing fitments is all that tight. I’ve used pipe in a press, and I’ve just used a small punch and a hammer too. (Tap the race you want to move..) They just don’t require much force or effort at all.
 

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The bearing hub thing behind the secondary has changed over time. I’ve removed it with the TCL, and without. Your only talking 4-6 extra bolts either way. (Just tear it apart)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for all of the help guys. I now have all of the bearings removed except for the one driven clutch bearing which remains attached to the jackshaft. I believe I'll need a shop press to remove that bearing and press on a new one.

FYI, I suspect there's an error in the bearing PNs listed in post #2. Based on reading the PNs etched into the bearing's I removed from my 2018, as well as verifying those PNs using Country Cat's site, I believe the PNs are as follows. Note that no PN was found anywhere on my factory upper chaincase bearing.
----> Also note: there is ONE (1) bearing noted by Country Cat as "C3". My understanding is that "C3" refers to a bearing with greater than normal clearance. My questions:
(a) If the caliper bearing is specified as C3, should a C3 bearing also be used for the lower chaincase?
(b) Since both the driven shaft (jackshaft) bearings are "Explorer" type (radial, aligning), should both of those bearings be C3? Note they are available in both C0 ("normal" clearance) and C3.
It would be extremely valuable to be able to ask someone at Cat about the above questions, yet I have no such contact.

PTO side bearings:
Upper (TCL) 2602-247 30 X 62 X 20 - 2206 -2RS (does not indicate C3)
Lower (caliper) 2602-198 6009-2RSFP (indicated C3)

Chaincase bearings:
2602-281 lower bearing chaincase 45 X 75 X 16 - 6009 (does not indicate C3
2602-734 upper bearing chaincase 30x62x20 62062RS (does not indicate C3)
 

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FYI, SKF owns Peer Bearing Co
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Good to know, thanks. I can ask SKF for more info, but I suspect Arctic Cat is the only one to answer which tolerance (normal or C3) is required for the above bearings. Anyone have such info or a good contact at Cat? The dealer just tells me to use Peer bearings...
 

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Good topic here. Has anyone found a good source for high quality bearings for these sleds? Has anyone spent the money and went to a semi ceramic bearing?
 
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