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Discussion Starter #1
At 5500 miles I figure it's time to do some real maintenance on my 2012 M1100T.

I'm going to be putting the Arctic Cat Driven Shaft Kit update (1100 version) in. I also ordered both chaincase seals, the bottom chaincase bearing, and the brake side drive shaft bearing as well.

I'm also going to replace the reverse fork wear pads and put the Arctic Cat Borg Warner Gearing Kit 21 x 49 in since I'm still using the original chain.

The service manual and a few threads mention that you need a ring nut socket (pn 0644-516) to get the ring nut off. It's a $50 socket, do I actually need it?

Also, how much of a pain in the ass did I just sign up for? Any particularly painful steps that are seared into your memory if you've replaced the parts I'll disassembling and replacing?

I've had the driveshaft out to replace the heat exchanger, so I'm familiar with the "interesting" view of the back of the motor you get when you do that. I'm more alarmed by jackshaft removal and replacing the bearings in the chaincase. It mentions needing to remove the inner chaincase from the sled to replace the bearings...

Speaking of, do you need a press to replace the two chaincase bearings?
 

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2021 VR1 850, 18 Tiger 8000, 17 RS 6000, 16 ZR 6000, 12 F1100T, 11 EXT 800, 09 Z1 Turbo, 05 ZR 900
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On my 2012 the only issue I had was at about 10,500 miles and that was the coolant bottle splitting, I did upgrade to the 2013 shaft at about 5,000 miles and the rest was all intact when I got rid of it at just under 11,000 miles.
 

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I don't remember using the socket tool- instead I think I used a punch to remove ad reinstall that bearing nut. You don't have to remove the inner case but it was a major PITA to replace the lower seal with it in. Use a little heat to warm casing around the bearings and they'll pop out and go in much easier. The biggest pita is the upper pto shaft bearing. If you buy that bearing already pressed on the shaft with a tcl you have to keep it perpendicular to shaft as you install it or the seals will pop off (a pain but I think cat sells a tool for this to keep it square). If you try to drive the bearing off and a new one on you'll need a special tool. OSP made a nice YouTube video for the XF1100 jackshaft install.
 

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You should use the socket so you can torque the nut. If the nut backs off it will kill the upper chaincase wobble bearing. I had this happen on a customer sled and had to do job twice.... live and learn I guess. The bearings pop right out if you apply a little heat with a propane torch. Job is not fun but not real hard. I would replace all the bearing just for a piece of mind.
 

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2014 XF800 137
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At 5500 miles I figure it's time to do some real maintenance on my 2012 M1100T.

I'm going to be putting the Arctic Cat Driven Shaft Kit update (1100 version) in. I also ordered both chaincase seals, the bottom chaincase bearing, and the brake side drive shaft bearing as well.

I'm also going to replace the reverse fork wear pads and put the Arctic Cat Borg Warner Gearing Kit 21 x 49 in since I'm still using the original chain.

The service manual and a few threads mention that you need a ring nut socket (pn 0644-516) to get the ring nut off. It's a $50 socket, do I actually need it?

Also, how much of a pain in the ass did I just sign up for? Any particularly painful steps that are seared into your memory if you've replaced the parts I'll disassembling and replacing?

I've had the driveshaft out to replace the heat exchanger, so I'm familiar with the "interesting" view of the back of the motor you get when you do that. I'm more alarmed by jackshaft removal and replacing the bearings in the chaincase. It mentions needing to remove the inner chaincase from the sled to replace the bearings...

Speaking of, do you need a press to replace the two chaincase bearings?
I made my own and would be more than happy to send it to you to use.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If installing the new style shaft you do not have to reinstall that nut (on the 800 at least) so just knock it off with a punch.
I'm installing the kit that "brings it to the 2015 specifications" on an 1100.

Here's the 2012 Microfiche:
CountryCat.com

And here's the 2015 Microfiche:
CountryCat.com

There are less parts in the 2015 version. Specifically parts #6 and #9 of the 2012 microfiche are absent in the 2015 version. Is #9 the nut that you normally have to use the socket on?
 

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Can't comment a whole lot, other than I replaced the lower chaincase seal and bearing + brake bearing when I did my track swap, just since I didn't feel like doing it again anytime soon. Both bearings are lightly pressed in. I just cobbled together my own puller out of thread rod/ bolt and a socket that was the right size(s). They pressed out and back in with minimal effort. I didn't use any heat though. With the chaincase seal, I just folded the edge over with a small screwdriver and hammer, and it was enough to yank out with a pliers. I drifted the new one in with a socket and all is well.

Edit: This was on my '16 turbo.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
I made my own and would be more than happy to send it to you to use.
Sounds like I fortunately don't need it, thank you for the offer though!

As for the supporting the bearing/shaft so that it stays perpendicular. This is to prevent damaging the seal on the clutch side of the jackshaft, or the seal on the chaincase side of the jackshaft? They reference a 6.5in long deep wall socket to do this, but I'm guessing PVC pipe cut to the right length is just as good.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I started ripping apart my sled to perform the upgrades and replacements. Here's a few hints and pain points:



Get a decent pair of snap ring pliers. I believe there's 1 on the bottom of the chaincase, 2 to 3 at the top of the chaincase, 1 on the outside of the driven clutch side jackshaft bearing, and one on the outside of the driveshaft clutch side bearing. The snap rings don't have holes, so you'll need a snap ring plier that has kind of a flat end. The least fun snap ring is on the chaincase side of the jackshaft, since you have to remove that snapring twice as if falls into another snap ring groove on the way off the shaft.



The jackshaft comes out on the driven clutch side. Since I was doing the update on a 2012 I didn't need to remove the bearing from the big aluminum bracket that is bolted to the motor. However, I would imagine that you have to remove the aluminum brakcet anyway to get the jackshaft out since the bearing is pressed onto the shaft and into the aluminum brakcet. The motor and the brakcet all have rubber mounts, so I imagine you'd never get enough impulse force onto anything to get the bearing or shaft to move.



Sneaking out the big aluminum bracket that holds the driven clutch side jackshaft bearing is a pain in the ass for several reasons:



-There is a thru bolt in the middle on the bracket that is a complete pain in the ass to get to on a turbo. To remove horizontal chassis support bar that is blocking the aluminum bracket's exit path we loosened the vertical support bar that goes up towards the handle bars to get better access. The brake line and and the main electrical harness are attached to that vertical support brace, so we only loosened it instead of removing it.



-The motor needs to be moved probably 2 inches to get the aluminum bearing support to clear the tab on the tunnel that it is thru-bolted to. It needs to be moved more forwards rather than upwards, and a crow bar between the metal tab that frames the heat exchanger and the engine did the trick. I would only put the crowbar against the metal tab of the heat exchanger frame, since any further towards the center of the front tunnel is the heat exchanger itself (there's nothing between the actual heat exchanger and the back of the motor).



Once the aluminum motor mount was moved up and around the metal tab on the heat exchanger frame a few taps on the jackshaft from the chaincase side was all that it took to get it completely out. My driven clutch side jackshaft bearing was in decent shape it seems, although the chaincase side was rough. I haven't pressed that bearing out of the chaincase yet.



Another hint: In the update kit the aluminum mount that holds the bearing is already installed onto the jackshaft. Be careful removing the jackshaft from the box because the bearing allows the shaft to go through at an angle. Without anything to keep the angle that the shaft goes through the bearing from becoming too large the jackshaft will pop out the bearing's seal. This is why they mention putting a 6.5" deep wall socket over the jackshaft, since this will prevent the jackshaft from ending up with too high an angle from perpendicular in the bearing and popping out the seal.
 

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I would like to point out, for those of you removing just the bearing, it is possible to get the right size tube (whatever material you want with one end capped to put the bolt through) and "pull" the jackshaft (and bearing) in the aluminum bracket out on the clutch side using the threads in the jackshaft. You will need a range of threaded bolts or some washers/spacers.

Just an alternative to pulling that bracket out, which was well described above. Major PITA!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I would like to point out, for those of you removing just the bearing, it is possible to get the right size tube (whatever material you want with one end capped to put the bolt through) and "pull" the jackshaft (and bearing) in the aluminum bracket out on the clutch side using the threads in the jackshaft. You will need a range of threaded bolts or some washers/spacers.

Just an alternative to pulling that bracket out, which was well described above. Major PITA!
Interesting idea. How do you press the new bearing back in applying force only to the outer race?
 

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Industrial bearing nut

I made my own and would be more than happy to send it to you to use.
Looks like an Industrial Nut to me.. I purchased one twice that size to work on a truck differential ..

I found an Industrial supplier with a reasonable price. .. I can't even remember the brand now or what they call them.
Mine is a BASF-10 but seems like there is a 16 on the Nut ..

https://www.whittet-higgins.com/part.php?series_id=76
 
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