Hardcore Sledder banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Here is the coupler Block adjustment explaination. Copied from old forum (thanks Jay)

Each number dials in the amount of "coupling" that the suspension has. The lower the number the slower that the suspension couples, the higher the number the quicker it couples. Or if I am still confusing, the rear suspension has two shocks as we all know. They act as (2) units when uncoupled, when coupled they act as (1) unit. The setting of the blocks determines how far the rear arm and shock move before the front shock starts taking some of the load. Hence, the more wheelie with less coupling, because the force is just acting on the rear shock. When more coupling is dialed in the less the wheelie, because now you are trying to compress both shocks at the same time and that takes more force. Typically the more the coupling the better the ride quality, the less the coupling the better the holeshot and weight transfer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Nick,

Could you please move it over?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,057 Posts
I think Rob may have closed access to letting us see old information, I sure don't the information anywhere!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Good job, Guys!!
Saves me the work :p

The old forum will stay up and you can search and find any of the old posts. Remember I combined the bulletins, tech, litterbox, and general into one, and that will make it easier to find things now.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,057 Posts
In thery, you would like to have the number 3 to the right (according to the pictures). The makes less transfer for the skid keeping the skis down. Now, I haven't had any snow to test it on, but maybe someone else on this board can give some more input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
Could someone who's had a chance to test this post a message about what setting to put the blocks on if you want to keep the skis on the ground a little better. According to the picture above, how should the block look for this?
Thanks,
Shane
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,846 Posts
Originally posted by shaneyb72@Dec 10 2002, 09:45 AM
Could someone who's had a chance to test this post a message about what setting to put the blocks on if you want to keep the skis on the ground a little better. According to the picture above, how should the block look for this?
Thanks,
Shane
According to the picture above, you want to rotate the block so that the #3 is facing towards the front of the sled (right of the picture), this will give you the most amount of coupling and the least amount of ski lift.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,048 Posts
Welcome to the world of FRSSes and RRSSes guys! It's kindof tricky to learn at first, but once you figure it out, it makes for a nice ride. It's as simple as this. To reduce ski lift in corners and keep the wheelies to a minimum, set the blocks so the thickest portion faces the front of the sled (contacts the rear arm when it's compressed). It has worked this way on Polaris sleds for years. If you plan on spending a weekend drag racing, take the blocks out all together and hang on tight. She'll just about flip over backwards when ya nail it ;) From the sounds of it, Cat may want to offer different (thicker)coupler blocks to those who have deeper lug Fcats. They're transferring too much weight and lifting the skis a lot even with the blocks set to maximum coupling.

Matt
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,057 Posts
Originally posted by Matt@Dec 10 2002, 11:54 AM
From the sounds of it, Cat may want to offer different (thicker)coupler blocks to those who have deeper lug Fcats.  They're transferring too much weight and lifting the skis a lot even with the blocks set to maximum coupling.

Matt
Yea, does anyone know if there are aftermarket blocks that are available that allow for better adjustment than the stock Cat blocks?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
The adjustments on this will vary from rider and conditions.

My suggestion is try it on 2, if it reduces your ski lift enough to make it fit your taste leave it there. If not try it on 3. Remember this effects weight transfer. Too much is not good either. I still have mine on 1, and find it ok, if I don't ride sitting back. I am going to try 2 this coming Sunday and see what it buys me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Thanks for clearing this up. All allong I thought you were talking about the spring blocks because on my last sled, 98 ZRT, it wasn't coupled. So how do you adjust the coupler block? Just by hand, or do you use the spark plug socket like the spring blocks? And do you have to go in one direction like the spring blocks? And to clerify, because I always get confused, when adjusting the spring block, are you supposed to always go in one direction? Maybe you're always supposed to turn it like you are tighting a nut? Clockwise? Or follow the numbers? Please help! :eek:
 
S

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
When changing the setting on the blocks get someone to sit on the sled and so that the couplers line up properly to the rear arm. I did not set mine perfectly and when I hit the first bump the blocks split in half. after fixing and setting them this way no problems.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top