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Discussion Starter #1
Advisory No: SAS313 Subject: Pre-Delivery Cooling System Bleeding

Affected Models:
All 2003 Firecat 500 cc and 700 cc Models

It has come to our attention that the cooling system on the affected
models
may develop an air bubble in the cooling system if the cooling system
has
not been properly bled. To ensure that an air bubble does not exist or
develop in the cooling system, Arctic Cat strongly advises all
dealers to
bleed the cooling system according to the procedure included in this
advisory.

If you have sold an affected snowmobile, please contact the owner
regarding
this issue.


NOTE: Be sure to have the identified pre-delivery work completed
before
allowing an owner to take possession of the affected snowmobile.

NOTE: Be sure to inform the customer to 1.) use up one full tank of
pre-mix, 2.) drive slowly during the break-in period, 3.) monitor the
coolant level and coolant temperatures, 4.) make sure there isn't air
in
the oil line.


Bleeding the Cooling System

NOTE: Prior to bleeding the cooling system, make sure the following
pre-preparations are completed.

A. Make sure there is 100:1 mixed gas in the tank.
B. Make sure that there is no air bubble in the oil line.
C. Make sure the switch on the console is in the ethanol mode.
D. Use regular mode only when running non-ethanol or non-MTBE
gasolines.

1. Check the coolant level in the clear coolant bottle on the
right-hand
side of the snowmobile.
2. If the coolant level is low, fill w/coolant.
3. Because the coolant fills slowly into the engine, it is necessary
to
wait for 10 minutes after filling the coolant tank to allow the
engine to
fill with coolant.
4. Recheck the coolant bottle level. If the level is low after 10
minutes,
repeat steps 2 and 3.
5. Install the coolant cap to the "first" position.
6. Start the engine. Do not exceed 3000 RPM.
7. After the engine has run for about 3-5 minutes, the right-side
running
board heat exchanger should feel warm to the touch.
NOTE: This is a sign that the thermostat has opened.
8. Shut off the engine.
9. Tighten the coolant cap to the "second" position.
10. Tip the snowmobile onto the left-hand side (PTO-side) to allow
air to
move from the rear heat exchanger to the coolant tank.
11. Recheck the coolant level. If the coolant level is low, repeat
steps 2
and 3.
12. Install the coolant cap to the "first" position.
13. Place the snowmobile onto a safety stand.
14. Start the engine and run for 1 to 2 minutes. Do not exceed 5000
RPM.
15. Monitor the heat exchanger temperature by touch.
16. Shut the engine off for 5 minutes.
17. Start the engine and repeat steps 7-16 an additional 2-3 times.

Thank you for your cooperation in this matter.


Sincerely,

Product Service Department
Arctic Cat Inc.
 

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Thanks Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #3
This will be on the dealers' fax machines tomorrow morning. You are seeing it here on HCS before anyone else. It was just released tonight to the dealers. This is the result of 1 very long week of testing. AC managed to eliminate the need to lift the front end. This proceedure works very well if it is followed exactly. Its easy to do and consumers can do it if they read through it and follow it to a T.
 

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Rob,

I'm might be reading into this too much, but after step 10"(Tip the snowmobile onto the left-hand side (PTO-side) to allow air to move from the rear heat exchanger to the coolant tank)" to step #11"(Recheck the coolant level. If the coolant level is low, repeat steps 2 and 3)", AC made no mention of tipping the sled back to the normal position(not on it's side) before doing step 11 "(re-check coolant level)".

Also, there is no mention of if we are to let the engine cool of before proceeding from step #10"(Tip the snowmobile onto the left-hand side (PTO-side) to allow air to move from the rear heat exchanger to the coolant tank)" to step #11"(Recheck the coolant level. If the coolant level is low, repeat
steps 2 and 3)".....

The coolant bottle does read "COOLANT FULL LEVEL/COLD FLUID LEVEL"....... Thoughts?

Thanks.
-John
 

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What is pto side is that clutch side my heat exchanger warms up on the clutch side first.
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Originally posted by JLeosnow@Dec 6 2002, 10:18 PM
Rob,

I'm might be reading into this too much, but after step 10"(Tip the snowmobile onto the left-hand side (PTO-side) to allow air to move from the rear heat exchanger to the coolant tank)" to step #11"(Recheck the coolant level. If the coolant level is low, repeat steps 2 and 3)", AC made no mention of tipping the sled back to the normal position(not on it's side) before doing step 11 "(re-check coolant level)".

Also, there is no mention of if we are to let the engine cool of before proceeding from step #10"(Tip the snowmobile onto the left-hand side (PTO-side) to allow air to move from the rear heat exchanger to the coolant tank)" to step #11"(Recheck the coolant level. If the coolant level is low, repeat
steps 2 and 3)".....

The coolant bottle does read "COOLANT FULL LEVEL/COLD FLUID LEVEL"....... Thoughts?

Thanks.
-John
John, I think it is presumed in those two instances that you need to tip the sled back to a normal position before checking the coolant level. And adding coolant means to the top of the coolant tank. The cold level is just that...when COLD. when you add here, the coolant is warm and top it off each time you need to add. And there is no need to let the engine cool between steps 10&11, as when the engine was running the cap was at the #1 or non-pressurized position. We only put it to #2 full closed position before we tip the sled with the engine off. This is to prevent spilling or the coolant. When you are done, leave the coolant tank full to the brim, and by the next morning it will be near the COLD mark. Don't worry about overfilling it, you can't. If neccasary excess coolant will be expelled through the overflow hose. It would only amount to an ounce or so at most. You want that tank FULL to the brim when it is hot.

And yes, PTO side is clutch side which is the left side :)
 

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Rob,

Thanks for the explanation. I kinda figured I was being a bit to detailed here, but when it is to be followed to a "T", that's the mode I kick into......

I'll be spending my morning and afternoon out in the garage looking over all the sleds 1 final time before use-age. 1 last burp proceedure on the F7, tracks that need to be adjusted, toe-in proceedures that need to be performed on the sleds besides my F7, ect..... :wacko:
-John
 

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Originally posted by rob@Dec 6 2002, 08:54 PM
This will be on the dealers' fax machines tomorrow morning. You are seeing it here on HCS before anyone else. It was just released tonight to the dealers. This is the result of 1 very long week of testing. AC managed to eliminate the need to lift the front end. This proceedure works very well if it is followed exactly. Its easy to do and consumers can do it if they read through it and follow it to a T.
Well, you answered my question about lifting the front end. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I should add that in the above proceedure, starting and
shutting off of the engine is critical and I fear many dealers will
skip those steps.


When the bubble gets caught in the rear exchanger there
is also one caught in each side hose that lead to the running board
exchangers. These are the high points. The problem is that the air
gets pushed through the system so fast that it can go straight to the
pump and cavitate. Thats why they are seeing the seizures. If the
pump cavitates from an air bubble it wont pump again until the engine
is shut off and allowed to bleed the air through the small line at
the top of the head.
It was a rather complicated problem.
 

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Rob,
Does Cat know which batch of sleds were affected or is it a random thing?
Also, I burped the sled according to your previous post about elevating the sled 41". Everything was good. Since then I've put 180 miles on her with no problems at all up at Tug Hill. The BIG question now is... am I safe to assume
that my sled won't melt down with this mileage???
Thanks for the great site! John
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I think you are good to go, John.
I think it is a random thing, but Cat is especially looking at F7's that had the coolant tank serviced for any reason. That lets an air bubble into the system.
 

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Hey Rob, I'm with highlander, my clutch side warmed up long before the other side. Is that normal? I noticed this during burping the machine with the instrustions posted here before.
 

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Scroos

This should be normal. According to the diagram in the performance manual the coolant runs from front to back on the left side board and into the rear cooler. Then runs back to front on the right side board. I guess the left side should warm up a little quicker than the left. But there should be no large temperature difference.
 

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When I warmed mine up out side on a cold day. I couldn't get mine or my buddy's right side to get warm except the very back by the handle. I figured that was okay because it was just idleing. My buddy had the same thing. He rode his this weekend and it warmed up. I think this sled cools so well that it need to run to have that heat exchanger get hot. I wouldn't worry about it too much until you run it. Check the very back of the right side heat exchanger when you run it. It will get a little warm. That will let you know its flowing.
 

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If the level is good cold could a person ride for five miles or so (after its completely warmed up) with the cap on the first position? If the air is in there it has to go somewhere so why not out there? Then after the five or so miles if the level is still good you should be good to go.
 

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i am good friends with my dealer and helped put mine together out the crate and we checked and it there were to and now it's fine never had a prblem nad it has 63 mi on but thanks for the warning
 

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So let me get this straight. There is no need to raise the front end of the sled in any of the steps. My dealer gave me the exact same bulliten that was posted but he said on the last steps to raise the front end. I don't think some of the dealers know to much about this. Kinda scary. Thanks for any info in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
the last word was follow this procedure and you're all set.
Stopping the engine when it is indicated is very important to doing it properly.
 

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ATTENTION: I’m told by an inside source at Cat that their is ANOTHER SB coming out for the cooling system. They will require the dealer to use a 5 gallon bucket to run coolant through the system checking flow. This is similar to a cool-down kit for grass drags.. Apparently the air bubble thing is a big problem for the dealers who are NOT sure how to properly bleed the system. The crate under the front end thing is NOT WORKING in many cases. Your pistons will have a scoring look to the front of the piston if you un-spring the pipe and look in. This air bubble can come loose at high RPM and overheat motor (scoring until ring or piston fails - NOT burndown). ALSO, with this or problem sleds a new CDI box program is added to richen up the mixture when the H2O temp rises. I was not told if the CDI change is for all sleds or the ones that overheat.

Once that’s taken care of, you will be good to go. This is new info as of 1/23 3pm
 
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