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What rebuild kit do you guys recommend for primary clutch? I've heard bad things about EPI but I cant find another manufacturer that makes a kit. any help is appreciated.. Picture is for you Don, This is current progress on the 2002. i did the pipes and added the EGTs today. :D she is going to be my pride and joy.
2107825
 

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First, I have no where near the experience of Phil, Don, Too Slow or most of the guys on here. That being said, I have had Indy Specialties rebuild and balance one of my primaries and it looks and works beautifully. Not the cheapest way to go, but as you stated: " She's going to be my pride and joy." I am going to have another one rebuilt this year.
 

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What rebuild kit do you guys recommend for primary clutch? I've heard bad things about EPI but I cant find another manufacturer that makes a kit. any help is appreciated.. Picture is for you Don, This is current progress on the 2002. i did the pipes and added the EGTs today. :D she is going to be my pride and joy. View attachment 2107825
I recommend OEM parts in most cases, not a kit but good quality rebuilding parts.
 

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My year working at a place mentioned and the hundreds of clutches I rebuilt. Spider rebuild kits we used Wahl bros. They are great quality. They might even be oem as far as I know. Just built into a kit. As far as bushings, oem is best.
 

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I have also rebuilt hundreds of clutches, team kits were great, epi kits also very good, oem stuff if you don’t need everything is sometimes cheaper. Biggest thing is proper tools and removal of the old parts. Cleaning moveable sheave and cover bushing bosses is crucial in getting clutch to work right when done. So to answer your question, spi Kits are not good. EPI and if you can find them, team kits are very good. OEM also good.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
First, I have no where near the experience of Phil, Don, Too Slow or most of the guys on here. That being said, I have had Indy Specialties rebuild and balance one of my primaries and it looks and works beautifully. Not the cheapest way to go, but as you stated: " She's going to be my pride and joy." I am going to have another one rebuilt this year.
The pride and joy sled I was referring to is different than the one I'm rebuilding. I'm rebuilding my dads xcr.. and he doesn't want to spend the money on Indy Dan. Plus I enjoy gaining the experience of doing it all myself.

I recommend OEM parts in most cases, not a kit but good quality rebuilding parts.
I was looking around and I was leaning towards Wahls Bros. Also I pressed in the bushing on the secondary like you suggested, worked like a charm. Also plan to use SLP Slippery buttons.
 

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I , too, always want to do things by myself; the clutch was for my '93 XLT w/ ES. I built it from two clutches because I wanted to keep the ES. It had a horrible vibration at 6,000-6500 rpm. That's why I sent it to IS. Also,the tools are a little pricey, but I found a nice set of tools for a good price.
My experience w/ Wahl Bros. has been great.
 

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I have also rebuilt hundreds of clutches, team kits were great, epi kits also very good, oem stuff if you don’t need everything is sometimes cheaper. Biggest thing is proper tools and removal of the old parts. Cleaning moveable sheave and cover bushing bosses is crucial in getting clutch to work right when done. So to answer your question, spi Kits are not good. EPI and if you can find them, team kits are very good. OEM also good.
You are correct, it the moveable sheave bearing area is not perfectly clean the sheave will have a good chance of binding.
Also correct: SPI rollers fail very quickly, DO NOT USE them.
 

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The pride and joy sled I was referring to is different than the one I'm rebuilding. I'm rebuilding my dads xcr.. and he doesn't want to spend the money on Indy Dan. Plus I enjoy gaining the experience of doing it all myself.


I was looking around and I was leaning towards Wahls Bros. Also I pressed in the bushing on the secondary like you suggested, worked like a charm. Also plan to use SLP Slippery buttons.
Wahl Bros. are great folks to deal with, they more than likely use OEM primary clutch components. I was unaware they still sold complete rebuild kits.
If you have never done a moveable sheave bearing installation you might find it rather hard to remove and install it, really should have the proper removal and install tools to do it so as not to ruin the bearing.
 

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Wahl Bros. are great folks to deal with, they more than likely use OEM primary clutch components. I was unaware they still sold complete rebuild kits.
If you have never done a moveable sheave bearing installation you might find it rather hard to remove and install it, really should have the proper removal and install tools to do it so as not to ruin the bearing.
I gotta ask. Because I plan on buying all the tools for myself. How do you protect the moveable sheave face when removing the bushing and installing it. I had a special mount for it when I did them, but I cant make that tool on my own. I was guessing a wood fixture with a hole in it?
 

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I gotta ask. Because I plan on buying all the tools for myself. How do you protect the moveable sheave face when removing the bushing and installing it. I had a special mount for it when I did them, but I cant make that tool on my own. I was guessing a wood fixture with a hole in it?
I use a very thick piece of rubber with the proper size hole to push the bearing into it, and using the right size aluminum drivers (2 different sizes) to remove & install them. I made the tools on my Lathe.
 

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I use a very thick piece of rubber with the proper size hole to push the bearing into it, and using the right size aluminum drivers (2 different sizes) to remove & install them. I made the tools on my Lathe.
Great thanks! I can make that. I will be buying the proper removal/install tool when the time comes. So far cleaning them every year goes a very long way in longevity for the bushings.
 

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I gotta ask. Because I plan on buying all the tools for myself. How do you protect the moveable sheave face when removing the bushing and installing it. I had a special mount for it when I did them, but I cant make that tool on my own. I was guessing a wood fixture with a hole in it?
What Ive found is that with the hard belts that are used today,by the time those bushings are bad the clutch is probably past its service life.Yes,you can cut the faces if there are no hairline cracks but the sheave faces can get thin pretty quick depending on how deep the grooves are.
 
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