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I have been lurking around on other brands boards and talking to many people on the trail. Guess what? all kinds of prople are blowing up sleds. All models. All makes. So what is so different about this year. Cold baby!! It is killing sleds out there with cold siezures, snow injestion, frozen carbs that lean out, fuel pump freezing, oil gelling in lines and ice in your fuel. This has been the coldest winter in memory and many sleds have fallen victom to it. Most guys follow the same warm up routine, Fill up and go at fuel stops, follow too close to the sled ahead and don't even consider what the cold may do to their sled. If you take some simple steps, a great and reliable ride is in the making. Here is some simple steps that will lessen the probability of siezure on cold days.

1) Always fill sled before putting it away. This will keep the condensation at the minimum and displace most moisture to the top.
2) put fuel dryer in your fuel an hour or two before you leave. This will eliminate most moisture and also give it time to get down to fuel pumps and such. It also will ensure that it is there when you ride. The stuff evaporates quickly and thus is useless if you put it in a few days or a week before.
3) Use a jack stand to warm your sled up. It will help get heat to all areas of the engine bay. Clutches need to warm, as does the belt. Pulling away with a cold belt can cause enough damage for premature failure. Warming up this way will allow you to make sure all heat exchangers are warm to the touch.
4) On really cold days it is a good idea to use a higher octane gas because it generally leans out your sled and can cuse detonation. Higher octane gas will give you a little more or a safe zone.
5) At the begining of the winter we usually clean our carbs and remove old fuel. At least once during the winter remove the water traps and drain. clean out the gas tank and dry it out as best you can, Fill up with gas and fuel dryer. This will really help with water problems.
6) Once out and running, try to stay out of the snow wash from the sled ahead of you. Snow injestion will cause the jets to clog up and lean out. Fuel dryers help but stopping every now and then and letting the heat of the engine melt the carbs is better. It only takes a few minutes. " My sled really has some pep with this cold can mean it is ripe for a burn down"
7) really cold weather can cause heat exchanger freeze over. The exchanger actually freeze over and this causes a cavity of air in between the exchanger and the ice. turn your sled on its side whenever you do your normal pee stop and knock the ice out of the exchagers.
8) Try to get off the edge of the trail sometimes to get fresh snow up into the exchangers as the trail can get frozen pretty hard and will not offer the proper amount of snow to cool the sled down.
9) Bring duct tape. At temps down below -25 degrees celcius, taping over your air vent up front will help with carbs not freezing and pipes running at optimim temperature.
10) Remind your buddies of this checklist. IF they break down, your stuck with them. Insist on it. You'll be a better friend.

I'm sorry if this offends some of your intelligence, it is not meant to. I have seen some pretty smart people break down because they thought they were doing things the right way or my personal favorite." It never said anything in my manual!" You can be your own beat friend or your own worst enemy, you choose.

Good luck :) :)

Jester :) :)
 

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Just one question Jester, I was always under the impression that on very cold days you are supposed to use a lower octane fuel to keep your engine running warmer, and on warm days to run high octane to keep your sled running cooler. No?
 

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Yes, on warmer days use a higher octane because it runs cooler, colder days run lower octane- it runs warmer!!!!! :rolleyes:
 

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While you may say it runs 'warmer', it would not be noticeable as you cannot run lower octane than recommended. As well, the higher octane you are burning is only costing you $$$.

Please people, quit thinking octane is the end all solution to power, performance and engine maintenance.
 
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