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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I just recently picked up a clean 2010 crossfire 800 since I’m in to those older models, just wondering how’s the reliability? It has 5000km which is like 3k miles is there anything I should be checking over? For example oil, diamond drive, what not? Or should I just go and get her serviced at a arctic cat dealer? What my best choice here
 

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Those sleds are very reliable and are good to 10000 miles without any major motor repairs as long as it’s well cared for. Change diamond drive lube every 3000 miles or once a year, add tunnel supports if it doesn’t have them, grease it often and there are lots of spots to do, check rear skid for loose or oblong wear on all bolts, as well as all the idler wheels. Feed it good quality oil, high test fuel,let it warm up well before you hammer it and it should be a good dependable sled for a long time. Other things we did was add a mountain seat, cleaned and checked both clutches often to keep everything working properly and moving freely. I ended up with after market skis but even a good set of snow trackers, deuce bars or slim Jim’s for carbides will improve steering. I’m sure others will add upgrades like clutch kits, fuel controllers, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
[
Those sleds are very reliable and are good to 10000 miles without any major motor repairs as long as it’s well cared for. Change diamond drive lube every 3000 miles or once a year, add tunnel supports if it doesn’t have them, grease it often and there are lots of spots to do, check rear skid for loose or oblong wear on all bolts, as well as all the idler wheels. Feed it good quality oil, high test fuel,let it warm up well before you hammer it and it should be a good dependable sled for a long time. Other things we did was add a mountain seat, cleaned and checked both clutches often to keep everything working properly and moving freely. I ended up with after market skis but even a good set of snow trackers, deuce bars or slim Jim’s for carbides will improve steering. I’m sure others will add upgrades like clutch kits, fuel controllers, etc.
she has the mountain seat, the guy I bought it off of hes in his 40s - 50s and bought it brand new off the floor in 2012,
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I’m just not too mechanically inclined to be taking apart clutched and what not, is there any major things I should be looking for? When I popped the hood I can tell the steering post bearing was really lubed as there was still a wad of grease on it, is there ways I can change the diamond drive oil without taking apart the clutch? For example what oil should I be running in the engine and the DD? All looks good in the skid and track besides usual rubbing on the sides, what should I be looking for major?
 

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Sounds like you should have someone experienced give it a look over, but in general from the pic it looks to be clean and well cared for but that’s just from the picture. I always run Cat gear lube but some do use other types of transmission fluid. Only need to remove the rear or driven clutch to do a DD fluid change. Pretty simple just pull the drain plug and then top it up until you can’t get anymore in the fill hole, reinstall the plug and secondary clutch and your done. I also always used Cat semi synthetic injector oil but there are other alternative. You should start by goggling maintenance on the Crossfires. There’s a shift load of info on the internet. To check the drive clutch no need to remove or tear it apart mostly just keep it clean and by using an open end wrench make sure the weight pins aren’t seized and move freely, but again I’d take to a shop that knows them or is at least capable of checking it over. You should regularly open the hood and feel for any leak or seeping from the bottom of the DD case for any sign of leakag. Fastest way to blow a DD is run low on fluid and not know it’s low.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sounds like you should have someone experienced give it a look over, but in general from the pic it looks to be clean and well cared for but that’s just from the picture. I always run Cat gear lube but some do use other types of transmission fluid. Only need to remove the rear or driven clutch to do a DD fluid change. Pretty simple just pull the drain plug and then top it up until you can’t get anymore in the fill hole, reinstall the plug and secondary clutch and your done. I also always used Cat semi synthetic injector oil but there are other alternative. You should start by goggling maintenance on the Crossfires. There’s a shift load of info on the internet. To check the drive clutch no need to remove or tear it apart mostly just keep it clean and by using an open end wrench make sure the weight pins aren’t seized and move freely, but again I’d take to a shop that knows them or is at least capable of checking it over. You should regularly open the hood and feel for any leak or seeping from the bottom of the DD case for any sign of leakag. Fastest way to blow a DD is run low on fluid and not know it’s low.
For sure! I’m gonna call the nearest shop and see how much it is too get a full service. In the morning or next just to get her ready for the winter
 

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Welcome to the forum. Boom has you pretty covered already but I will go ahead and add, At that age, it would not be a bad idea to consider, and if you were to ask a AC dealer for a full service, this is what you’d likely get:
1, Gear oil changed and if metallic particles are abundant in it,gear case opened up for inspection.
2, exhaust valves removed, cleaned, cables inspected and adjusted
3, rear suspension removed, (that’s the only way to really check it for wheel bearings and worn parts)
4, rear shocks rebuilt at that time, (now a rebuild could just be an oil change in them, or they could need new seals.)
5, remove and rebuild front shocks as well.
6, replace skid runners (hyfax) while skid is out.
7, ski carbides? Could be good, could be pretty worn
8, a guy that knows what to look at can tell you if the clutches need attention without actually taking them apart, so your minimal cost there.
But basically, you can spend $0 or you can spend $200-500,maybd more, depending on how close you want to look. Those are great sleds, but great sleds still need attention
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Welcome to the forum. Boom has you pretty covered already but I will go ahead and add, At that age, it would not be a bad idea to consider, and if you were to ask a AC dealer for a full service, this is what you’d likely get:
1, Gear oil changed and if metallic particles are abundant in it,gear case opened up for inspection.
2, exhaust valves removed, cleaned, cables inspected and adjusted
3, rear suspension removed, (that’s the only way to really check it for wheel bearings and worn parts)
4, rear shocks rebuilt at that time, (now a rebuild could just be an oil change in them, or they could need new seals.)
5, remove and rebuild front shocks as well.
6, replace skid runners (hyfax) while skid is out.
7, ski carbides? Could be good, could be pretty worn
8, a guy that knows what to look at can tell you if the clutches need attention without actually taking them apart, so your minimal cost there.
But basically, you can spend $0 or you can spend $200-500,maybd more, depending on how close you want to look. Those are great sleds, but great sleds still need attention
For sure I’m gonna check it out with a AC Dealer in the next day or so, I don’t think anything needs to be rebuilt I’m fond with the fox floats but basically not anything else. I had to keep it up with my crf 250r I was easily able to do that once I learned but at the moment just wanted to get it done professionally by a Arctic cat dealer so I’d say that’s what I’ll do
 

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Before I’d do anything with those Foat 2’s (pretty sure that’s what it has) in my humble opinion there are much better options and not that pricey. For now main thing is get it serviced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Before I’d do anything with those Foat 2’s (pretty sure that’s what it has) in my humble opinion there are much better options and not that pricey. For now main thing is get it serviced.
I’m pretty sure it’s just the 1s I’m not 100% sure, but keep this thread open, in a few days I’ll let you guys know what I’m deciding to do I appreciate the help just wouldn’t want anything to happend to the sled, either she’s mint or she needs to be cleaned up but I’ll keep you guys posted!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I’m pretty sure it’s just the 1s I’m not 100% sure, but keep this thread open, in a few days I’ll let you guys know what I’m deciding to do I appreciate the help just wouldn’t want anything to happend to the sled, either she’s mint or she needs to be cleaned up but I’ll keep you guys posted!
Anyways Can I post a video in here? Here’s a few pics of the clutch
 

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It all looks to be in decent condition. It needs a clean up. I blow mine out with my air compressor weekly but first thing is get it looked at at a dependable shop. If you got a Manuel it wouldn’t hurt to have a look. It will give you info on the easy way to change belts, change DD fluid, adjust track alignment and tension. Gives you proper method to check ski alignment as well as ski pressure for handling. Most of this I just mentioned with a little patience and experimenting you will be able to do your self.

Some tips for longevity and trouble free sledding are always let the sled warm up a bit before you start giving it hard, also never tried to move it if it’s got a track frozen to the snow. Always free it up by rocking the sled or lifting the rear end and letting it drop gently to free it up. This will save drive belt wear and tear on the track. Get into the habit of always topping up the oil , checking your sliders for wear and carbides. This is before you leave for a day, nothing worse than realizing an hour from home your low on oil (or gas) or your carbides a bent or wore out. You may know all this not sure how much sledding you’ve done but never hurts to remind a fellow sledder.

Leraning how to remove a belt by removing the rear clutch bolt (1/2 inch) and reversing it and then screwing it back in to spread the sheeves for easy belt removal. The insert you remove and turn the other way also has shims held on by an o ring for adjusting or shimming the driven clutch for proper belt fit. Your belt is sitting at the perfect height as it is now. Just the thickness off the cooling fins on the belt above the rear clutch. That’s a lot of stuff hope it helps. If it’s info overload just say.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
It all looks to be in decent condition. It needs a clean up. I blow mine out with my air compressor weekly but first thing is get it looked at at a dependable shop. If you got a Manuel it wouldn’t hurt to have a look. It will give you info on the easy way to change belts, change DD fluid, adjust track alignment and tension. Gives you proper method to check ski alignment as well as ski pressure for handling. Most of this I just mentioned with a little patience and experimenting you will be able to do your self.

Some tips for longevity and trouble free sledding are always let the sled warm up a bit before you start giving it hard, also never tried to move it if it’s got a track frozen to the snow. Always free it up by rocking the sled or lifting the rear end and letting it drop gently to free it up. This will save drive belt wear and tear on the track. Get into the habit of always topping up the oil , checking your sliders for wear and carbides. This is before you leave for a day, nothing worse than realizing an hour from home your low on oil (or gas) or your carbides a bent or wore out. You may know all this not sure how much sledding you’ve done but never hurts to remind a fellow sledder.

Leraning how to remove a belt by removing the rear clutch bolt (1/2 inch) and reversing it and then screwing it back in to spread the sheeves for easy belt removal. The insert you remove and turn the other way also has shims held on by an o ring for adjusting or shimming the driven clutch for proper belt fit. Your belt is sitting at the perfect height as it is now. Just the thickness off the cooling fins on the belt above the rear clutch. That’s a lot of stuff hope it helps. If it’s info overload just say.
No way man I appreciate it a ton! Is my primary supposed to move a bit back and forth? Like is it safe, i know it’s good that it rotates but moving it back and forth just the slightest bit, it makes a little clicky sound but it’s barely enough to hear it, I understand clutch’s make a lot of noise especially on arctic cats but I have a video of it all if I could figure out a way to send it, I contacted a dealer and they said they could check it all over and if I supply the oils and lube they’ll do it for cheaper.
 

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Your moving the front (primary) clutch? Probably just feeling compression as the pistons and rings change direction.
 

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I’m not understanding either with the clutch sound. Is only when it starts or is this with you moving it back and forth by hand? If the dealer isn’t a Cat dealer then you will need to get lube from somewhere else. I’ve only ever used Cat brand lube but there are other alternatives.
 

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I use cat lube too. Unless it’s on my own sled and I am changing gears every few weeks, then I have used tractor type hydraulic fluid
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I’m not understanding either with the clutch sound. Is only when it starts or is this with you moving it back and forth by hand? If the dealer isn’t a Cat dealer then you will need to get lube from somewhere else. I’ve only ever used Cat brand lube but there are other alternatives.

When I rock the clutch back and forth it makes a little movement almost like the bearing is wearing but I’m not sure, if I could send videos on this forum I’d show you it’s the primary.
 
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