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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys! I'm having a hell of a time keeping up with my hubby in the trails. I'm a bit timid I guess. What is a good way for me to learn to be a bit more aggressive in the trails? I have studs, I have the HP, but how can I get my confidence up? HELP!!! Don't want to be second to him. I can take him on the lake, but he says that not like being able to take him on the trails... :ph34r: Anyway, if you guys can give me any advice, please do. I'm happy with being No. 1, even if it's only in a straight line, but I would gloat for the rest of winter if I kicked his ass in the trails... ^_^
 

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Originally posted by arcticf7@Jan 28 2003, 09:58 AM
Hey Guys! I'm having a hell of a time keeping up with my hubby in the trails. I'm a bit timid I guess. What is a good way for me to learn to be a bit more aggressive in the trails? I have studs, I have the HP, but how can I get my confidence up? HELP!!! Don't want to be second to him. I can take him on the lake, but he says that not like being able to take him on the trails... :ph34r: Anyway, if you guys can give me any advice, please do. I'm happy with being No. 1, even if it's only in a straight line, but I would gloat for the rest of winter if I kicked his ass in the trails... ^_^
:rolleyes: Put a set of mirrors on HIS sled. He will get nervous when he doesn't see you and slow down. Sure works for Jane and I ^_^ :rolleyes:
 

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I guess I would say it is experience. You can't just go out one day and say I'm going to ride the trails the fastest today. When people do that, thats how they get hurt or even worse...killed.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
There's a thought. Would love just once to come smokin by him though...LOL! Just don't want to kill myself tryin though. :wacko:
 

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Experience...experience, time on the sled and knowing where you're riding. It gets easier everytime you go out.
 

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Please don't worry about keeping up or passing your hubby on the trails. The trails are not a race corse!!!!!! I love to ride hard too but some places are not ment for high speeds!!! On the lake, YOU GO GIRL!!!!!!
 

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I would say that each corner you go through, try to figure out if you could have went faster through it. Think about each move you make and whether or not it was the right one. Each time out, push your self a little harder. You have to get a good feel for the sled and how it responds under different conditions. Each sled is a little different and you may find that you need to fine tune the suspension settings to get her to hum! Have patience and you can ride safe and aggressively at the same time!
 

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I always am watching way ahead of my sled, looking for the line I want to ride in. Especially on the Firecat, don't be afraid to move around on the seat. The sled will respond nicely to how you move around, lean, pull, etc. BE CAREFUL!

How long have you been riding anyway?
 

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Consider this:

Perhaps he is going to fast or willing to take more risks than necessary.

It's better to get there than be the winner and hit someone head on or fly off the trail.

I push my sled fairly hard through the trails. My friend and I almost trail race at times, or at least it seems that way the way we fly. But we are actually trying to stay at about 70 to 80% of the top speed we feel we can carve a trail. Now that being said, the F7's I feel can go about 30% faster than my older ZR600 or any older ZR chassis through the trail. Why? Because they have a tremendous pull and power in the straights and can soak up heavy bumps with ease.

To go faster I have found the following helps:

(Consider that my sled and my frame might be different than yours.)

I weight 135 lbs.

1. I ride a LOT of standup in the bumps. I'm off the seat as much as 60 to 70% of the time when the trails are rough. That's a LOT of standup and a real workout. If your husband is riding more standup in the rough than you are, he will pull away no matter how much you try to keep up with him because he can soak up the bumps a lot more. However standup has it's risks which are slower cornering at times unless you lean and you have to be more aware of low branches.

2. I am almost always carefully picking "WHEN" I can corner a bit faster or slower. Some treelined sections of the trail are bare and have more visability so you can see around the corners. Those can be taken faster, because you can see far ahead of the corner and know there are no sleds ahead. Pine trees and thick tree lined corners offering blind curves mean it's time to SLOW DOWN. If you don't take the changing terrain into your equation, you can easily get into trouble or a HEAD ON COLLISION.

3. Don't FOLLOW CLOSELY. It's not a race. You can WIN when you start ahead of him and STAY AHEAD of him with him feeling comfortable that your riding fast enough. It's not about getting close to the other guy because if they stop fast, you may hit them. Some people have fallen off their sleds only to have a fellow rider hit them in the helmet with a ski and break a neck or worse. I heard about a rider getting paralyzed because of a close rider hitting them after they flew off their sled.

4. I find that for me setting my coupling block to 2 helped me keep the ski's down which allows me to carve the corners a bit more. I would definately make more adjustments to the ski's (ski pressure) etc to allow more carving if your thinking about increasing speed on the trail. (I've found that setting the coupling block to 2 was enough for me. I am used to a LOT of ski lift anyway.)

5. Experimenting with different turning speeds and styles in an open field is good to get a feel for your sled. I have spent time early seasons just going in circles at different speeds in open areas to get a feel for the "EDGE". This cannot give you everything you need to know or will run into on the trails because you will have ICE, RUTS and other obsticles that can cause additional problems when your pushing the envelope. For this reason I try to ride within 70% of my "edge" ability and that works out to a fairly fast trail speed.

6. There will always be someone faster. My friend and I have been passed by maniacs on ZR's who were travelling way to fast and taking turns wide while on our F7's. We were going a fairly fast clip. Guess what? Within a mile or two we saw a ZR stuck in the woods, it hit a tree.

7. I've found that leaning by putting my (left cheek) butt over the center of the seat when turning right and right cheek when turning left is enough leaning for me to carve the corners faster. I'm not going as fast as I can through the corners, but love to EXPLODE and hit the throttle hard after coming out of the corners. For years I practiced taking turns by slowing into them without breaking and then accellerating out of them. However that was not as fast (on a ZR) as my friend who breaked hard into corners and then pulled out of them. It was a different riding style, but I like my smoother style (smoother in my mind at least). When I add occassional breaking it helps me go faster.

8. This is something that's a variable and I don't recommend it for trail riding, but I have found at times it makes me get around turns faster. The back of my sled (with 156 studs) will POWER SLIDE if I turn the ski's a bit into a turn and hit the break. The degree of sliding is dependent on the speed I'm going, how icy the turn is, and how hard and long I hit the break. It makes for a shorter sliding turn. But is NOT VERY PREDICTABLE. You'll see Sno-Cross racers do this in events on F chassis Sno-Pros. Not something you can do often with certainty, but I figured I'd bring it up.

CONCLUSION:
These tips may help you. Pushing the envelope to much is not a good idea however. I was shocked the other day when racing in a field how fast my F7 was going and how LONG it took for me to slow down. The f7's are deceptively FAST and that SPEED can easily WARP a person into a problem situation.

Ride safe. Have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Originally posted by Wicked King@Jan 28 2003, 11:38 AM
I always am watching way ahead of my sled, looking for the line I want to ride in. Especially on the Firecat, don't be afraid to move around on the seat. The sled will respond nicely to how you move around, lean, pull, etc. BE CAREFUL!

How long have you been riding anyway?
I used to ride all the time as a kid...then parents got rid of sleds. I've been into horses ever since, and two years ago went with friends on a 150 mile ride. Amongst all the sore muscles...I also, as did my hubby, get the bug to get back into it. It's my second season of riding since reentering the sport.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Originally posted by jakesF7@Jan 28 2003, 11:47 AM
Who cares about the trails,smoke him in the straitaways!He must look like this on the lake! :eek:

:ph34r: Yes...His look does resemble that, and he waves good bye...of course, I never see the wave! LOL
 
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