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Bought an F-7 in november, didnt get to ride her here much,
finally went to the U.P. this week, had a chance to put her to the test...
first out on the lake...raced for the first , my buddy has a bone stock rev 600ho, I beat him...my sled is still stock... So we stop and he wants to set a few things... he rolls back his stop blocks, loosens up his front springs, tightens up his center shock, all this took a couple of miniutes and he proceeds to kick my butt... 3 times, at 80 or so I turn on and he is done at 100, I pass him...
Next problem, we get in the trails...I start riding like I used to ride my 95 zr 700...wow... I have to slow down in the corners!! she feels huge top heavy, I now can't keep up with my two buddys, one of which is on my 95 zr700.
I love the power of the motor but I need some guidence on what problem I have if any, sorry guys, I cant get beat by a 600 and be out rode in the trails,
If so it will be a zr900 or a...and I hate to say it...rev 800

PLEASE HELP!!! :angry:
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Oh by the way this is a F-7 snow pro, I installed 102 woodys 1.45" studs and when I did race on the lake I felt like the sled just spun the track, my bud claims his track was spinng to but i really felt i was not hooking up at all. the lake was hard pack snow...i know this sled is better than this...help :(
 

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well bro, power aint the issue, set up is. You can use the search engine on this site to set up anything you want.....

suspension is key for illiminating ski lift and to make it corner like a zr ;)

in the trails i have never been owned by anything, yet.....

you have to adjust to its ride, then ride hard..... but it does take some tweaking, out of the box its to much machine


hehehe
 

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the firecat takes a little different riding style took me a while to see that! i came from a 00 zr 700 i know what you are saying about the handeling got me at first to. still not 100% on my f-7 suspension? and now they come out with crosslink on f-7 damm that chould be the answer :D
 

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I have come over to CAT from a GenII Polaris XC700 (which I had DIALED IN!) and boy, lemme tell ya, It took some time to get the hang of the Fcat! Actually, My brother was havin work done to his DOODOO FIII and I lent him my XC7 and the BASTARD actually passed me in the WHOOPS and I WAS PISSED. I spent some time playing around with the F7 and WHALLA -- CYA BABY B)

Change your Coupling, adjust the Ski Pressure, and MOVE AROUND ON THAT BABY! You NEED BODY ENGLISH for it to respond. Sit close to the bars (or stand) in the corners, and she will ROCK B)
 

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I agree with all the above statements. You need to setup your suspension properly, and once you do, it'll flat out handle. I would've put more than 102 studs in it. 156 1.45s work out much better for me.
 

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Same thing here....took some time to find the right suspension set-up, and also... PULL DOWN YOUR LIMITER STRAPS!!!!! This puts more track on the ground and puts more pressure on the front skis. Put 8" carbides on the skis. With this setup, this sled rocks around corners and gets a great holeshot!! Also, take out the coupling blocks...you get the best of both worlds....a little ski lift and a little better rear shock performance in the rough stuff. This is,without a doubt, the best performing sled I have EVER owned. Get it dialed in, and you won't be disappointed. :D
 

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Actually sabrecat f-7 when you tighten up your limiter straps you put less track on the ground, the reason for tightening them up is to reduce the angle of attack in which the track rotates for less friction and to also put the nose of the sled closer to the ground (center of gravity). As far as it putting more pressure on the skis that is primarily done with your front shocks tightening them or your center shock loosening it. NEVERENUFF it sounds like your riding style is directed more toward the ZR900 low center of gravity straight line ecceleration. The F-7 sno-pro was not made to be tied down, it was made to take jumps and turns. After 90 mph that thing runs good, I should know I was the buddy, on my girlfriends REV 600 H.O. I will help you set it up to drag but it wont like it, it would rather be soaring over doubles and triples. As far as the trails i dont think i will even get an argument from this forum that the F-7 is no match for any REV chassis, providing they have rode a REV for very long. P.S. I think this is a great site for all the new F-7 owners. B)
 

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Set up youre suspension. Search the forum for setups. Once you have it down she should be railing. I had a z 440 before the f5 lots of getting used to
 

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I also think you need some time to get used to this snowmobile. Read this article by supertrax magazine:Firecat: A Learning Curve
(September 24, 2002)

In corners the Firecat is profoundly different than the ZR series Cats. In fast, flat turns there’s more body roll at play and the Firecat seems to have a subliminal narrower feel than the firmly planted demeanor of the older chassis.

Furthermore, the longer track, albeit narrower, tends to resist initial turn-in. Here’s the effect. In their present state F-Cats tend to understeer at initial approach to an apex and then rapidly convert to oversteer at the apex and beyond. This is not necessarily evil or uncomfortable - it’s just something you have to retrain yourself to accept.

Some of this behavior is because of the Firecat’s snocross racing roots. Accepted procedure with successful racers is to approach the corner carrying as much speed as possible and while standing, literally haul the sled onto its side while pivoting. With all this going on, full throttle is applied prior to the apex to complete the turn with the track loose and churning around the corner.

The bottom line is this technique works especially well with a very narrow track like the Firecat’s and even better on a grainy, chewed up mush surface like most snocross tracks become during a race. The bad news is trail riders don’t ride like this. So there’s a learning curve. Certainly, snowmobilers are an adaptive crew but will they change their riding style to the degree described above?


-----While i'll admit that the handling certainly feels different, it's much better in the twisties. the sled just seems to whip around corners, almost like it's hinged in the middle. it's a strange sensation but it really works. for high-speed flat out corners i still think the zr chassis is better, but if you really use some body english the firecat chassis is pretty darn close.
 
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