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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,

I recently got a 2013 Polaris switchback. This is my first modern snowmobile as I used to ride old Polaris wedge chassis style. I had it in the shop, rebuilt all the stock Fox shocks and went through the entire sled. I set up the shocks to the "Perfect fit" that's in the owners manual. I took it to northern Wisconsin to ride this past weekend and man new sleds are way different than the older ones. I'll start by saying the sled handles the minimal trail chop beautifully. I was barely sore after 175 mile ride. However, I ride fairly aggressively and I think the handling is pretty awful. I can't keep the lead ski on the ground when cornering. It's borderline dangerous.
Like I mentioned I come from older wedge chassis sleds so your center of gravity is way lower. Maybe this is how the newer sleds are but wanted to hear from other owners and their thoughts.
Also if anyone has any special shock set up's they run I'd love to hear the recommendations.
 

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Set the front track shock as soft as you can. This lets the front end sit in lower naturally.

Tightening the rear spring will give you more front end bite and less weight transfer.

When the trails are smooth I actually turn the front shock clickers way up to corner flatter. And turn them softer when it gets more rough for comfort.

Personally I like the weight transfer. I have my front track shock set soft as I can. This helps with keeping the front end down when I'm not heavy on the throttle. I'm never hard on the throttle in the corners.
 

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It's a process. I've spent the last 500 miles tuning the suspension on my 2014 SB Adventure after a total suspension rebuild. I'm finally there, after trying 2 different skis and 4 different sets of carbides. I've currently got the FTS backed off one turn from the factory 1 3/8th. Front springs at 3" factory preload and Studboy 6" duce bars. Different skis than your 2013, Polaris changed them in 2014-present. Everything else I think is the same suspension, as your 2013 except I have WE shocks.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Appreciate the feedback guys! I'm glad to hear that it isn't just me.
I like the soft shock set up idea. Thank you.

Also while I got your guys attention. I have the stock Fox shocks that don't have the clickers. Is it worth upgrading?
 

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Appreciate the feedback guys! I'm glad to hear that it isn't just me.
I like the soft shock set up idea. Thank you.

Also while I got your guys attention. I have the stock Fox shocks that don't have the clickers. Is it worth upgrading?
The clickers do make a difference that amazes me. A couple clicks one way or the other was noticeable even before the shock rebuild!
 

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So disclaimer, I suspect all of the posters here are faster on the trails than I... I didn't learn how to snowmobile back when I was immortal so I am never going to be as quick around the bends as those of you who have that instinct. But in my opinion no amount of suspension tuning will make a modern sled ride like the wedge chassis. A different technique is required. Due to the rider being positioned higher on the sled the rider actually has more authority over the sled position (longer lever of higher position)... that high CG point is mostly the rider position, not the sled This means that to go fast... you have to be an active rider. Put your weight forward and lean over the inside ski in corners and that ski will stay very well planted. However if you do not stay active.. that higher rider position will work against you, increasing the tendency to lift the inside ski in corners. The modern chassis can get through corners just as quick if not quicker and safely.... Just need to ride it differently.

And of course, the modern sled suspension has alot more knobs, clickers, and other adjustments as mentioned above to fine tune the sled to you and what your priorities are when riding, that were not available on the wedge chassis.

Mike
 

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took me 2 years to get to where i am very comfortable in the straights and corners. It was definitely a process of one thing at a time to figure out the best suspension for my height and weight
 

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So disclaimer, I suspect all of the posters here are faster on the trails than I... I didn't learn how to snowmobile back when I was immortal so I am never going to be as quick around the bends as those of you who have that instinct. But in my opinion no amount of suspension tuning will make a modern sled ride like the wedge chassis. A different technique is required. Due to the rider being positioned higher on the sled the rider actually has more authority over the sled position (longer lever of higher position)... that high CG point is mostly the rider position, not the sled This means that to go fast... you have to be an active rider. Put your weight forward and lean over the inside ski in corners and that ski will stay very well planted. However if you do not stay active.. that higher rider position will work against you, increasing the tendency to lift the inside ski in corners. The modern chassis can get through corners just as quick if not quicker and safely.... Just need to ride it differently.

And of course, the modern sled suspension has alot more knobs, clickers, and other adjustments as mentioned above to fine tune the sled to you and what your priorities are when riding, that were not available on the wedge chassis.

Mike
Your right. And thats why they put the engine so low. Your right that if your taking a corner hard, having your body off the sled over the skis is required. But if your at a moderate pace, even just leaning your body helps the inside ski lift. You dont have to get your butt off the seat at a moderate pace. Just lean your body to one side.

Experience also makes inside ski lift not daunting either. It can eventually just be apart of the ride.
 

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So disclaimer, I suspect all of the posters here are faster on the trails than I... I didn't learn how to snowmobile back when I was immortal so I am never going to be as quick around the bends as those of you who have that instinct. But in my opinion no amount of suspension tuning will make a modern sled ride like the wedge chassis. A different technique is required. Due to the rider being positioned higher on the sled the rider actually has more authority over the sled position (longer lever of higher position)... that high CG point is mostly the rider position, not the sled This means that to go fast... you have to be an active rider. Put your weight forward and lean over the inside ski in corners and that ski will stay very well planted. However if you do not stay active.. that higher rider position will work against you, increasing the tendency to lift the inside ski in corners. The modern chassis can get through corners just as quick if not quicker and safely.... Just need to ride it differently.

And of course, the modern sled suspension has alot more knobs, clickers, and other adjustments as mentioned above to fine tune the sled to you and what your priorities are when riding, that were not available on the wedge chassis.

Mike
Trust me, at 70 I'd betcha I'm not as fast as you are. I started again last winter after not having ridden since the 440 Cat days in the '70's. It's quite a difference that 50 years makes, both on the sleds AND the bod!
I ride with two 50 something brothers who were both very good motocross riders in their day. One can't stand the new sleds but motors right along on his 2002 Polaris. The other, older brother, has been sledding right along and currently rides a 850 19 Indy. That one just bought himself a new 350 4-stroke KTM. LOL
 
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