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Looking for advice. Sagging sled was sitting on coupler blocks in the 45* garage with no snow weighing it down. I lift the back end and will sit maybe 1" higher and will go down with nearly no resistance. Fox zero pro shocks rebuilt 500 miles ago this year. went to michigan and rode and conditions were fine, not terrible or moguls. The suspension has barely been used this year. Springs are set on highest tension.

Could the shocks be blown already? Anything else I should be checking?
 

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Looking for advice. Sagging sled was sitting on coupler blocks in the 45* garage with no snow weighing it down. I lift the back end and will sit maybe 1" higher and will go down with nearly no resistance. Fox zero pro shocks rebuilt 500 miles ago this year. went to michigan and rode and conditions were fine, not terrible or moguls. The suspension has barely been used this year. Springs are set on highest tension.

Could the shocks be blown already? Anything else I should be checking?
The only way to tell us to pull the shock out and see if it's still pressurized or have the dealer put a gauge on it. I bet you're springs are sacked out. I change mine every third year because they're sacked out.
 

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Looking for advice. Sagging sled was sitting on coupler blocks in the 45* garage with no snow weighing it down. I lift the back end and will sit maybe 1" higher and will go down with nearly no resistance. Fox zero pro shocks rebuilt 500 miles ago this year. went to michigan and rode and conditions were fine, not terrible or moguls. The suspension has barely been used this year. Springs are set on highest tension.

Could the shocks be blown already? Anything else I should be checking?
Have you had the skid out lately? Just make sure the rear shock didn't somehow pivot down where it's mounted at front.
 

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Nothing to do with the shocks. Sled needs to be in a flat surface with nothing underneath it. No dolly's.
shocks do affect how high the rear end sits or the front end or the pressure on the front track shock there's no doubt about it that a pressurized gas shock of 200 PSI takes at least 50 or 60 pounds of force to compress it. don't tell me that does not make a difference in ride height it does. End of discussion.
 

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shocks do affect how high the rear end sits or the front end or the pressure on the front track shock there's no doubt about it that a pressurized gas shock of 200 PSI takes at least 50 or 60 pounds of force to compress it. don't tell me that does not make a difference in ride height it does. End of discussion.
I can push the shaft in on a new shock and it does not take 50+ lbs to do so. The springs hold the back of the sled up. unhook the springs and the sled will bottom out. If it were an air shock, it will hold the back of the sled up but not talking that type.
 

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shocks do affect how high the rear end sits or the front end or the pressure on the front track shock there's no doubt about it that a pressurized gas shock of 200 PSI takes at least 50 or 60 pounds of force to compress it. don't tell me that does not make a difference in ride height it does. End of discussion.
I got an idea......Just for shits and giggles some time this summer, pull the rear shock out of your skid and see what happens......
I guarantee it will stay fully in the upright position, and when pushed down, it will pop right back up faster than it ever does with a shock in it....
Now for the OP's problem....If the sled is not on dollies, then something else is up......
Could be the front ski springs have been cranked tight enough to overcenter the center shock and put too much weight on the rear springs.....
Could be one or more of the rear cross shafts is cruddy/rusty causing binding.....If the front ski shocks have not been adjusted, then the skid needs to come out to diagnose the issue.....
It is NOT the shocks......
 

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I got an idea......Just for shits and giggles some time this summer, pull the rear shock out of your skid and see what happens......
I guarantee it will stay fully in the upright position, and when pushed down, it will pop right back up faster than it ever does with a shock in it....
Now for the OP's problem....If the sled is not on dollies, then something else is up......
Could be the front ski springs have been cranked tight enough to overcenter the center shock and put too much weight on the rear springs.....
Could be one or more of the rear cross shafts is cruddy/rusty causing binding.....If the front ski shocks have not been adjusted, then the skid needs to come out to diagnose the issue.....
It is NOT the shocks......
Been there done that. you cannot argue the fact that it takes 50 lb to collapse a shock. that being said it does aid in ride height.
 

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Been there done that. you cannot argue the fact that it takes 50 lb to collapse a shock. that being said it does aid in ride height.
Might aid in "loaded" ride height, but for example, the rear lower shock mount on the Doo R Motion can be moved from a lower to higher position to soften the suspension. There is zero load on the rear shock in the R Motion and it can be moved easily.
There is no doubt that the Cat suspension has some load on the rear shock even at the lowest static position, but it has no effect on unloaded suspension position.
 

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shocks do affect how high the rear end sits or the front end or the pressure on the front track shock there's no doubt about it that a pressurized gas shock of 200 PSI takes at least 50 or 60 pounds of force to compress it. don't tell me that does not make a difference in ride height it does. End of discussion.
Wrong. And I won't go into detail as other posters have beat me to it.
 

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Even though it may take 50 lbs to collapse a shock, a conventional non-air shock will not spring back, it will stay compressed. However, an air shock will spring back. Therefore a conventional shock does not hold the sled up. But an air shock does. What type of shock are we talking about? If its the 2015 Pantera 7000 then it's a conventional, non-air shock.
 

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Wrong. And I won't go into detail as other posters have beat me to it.
Wrong back at ya.......For example the TZ1 series of Cats(arguably some of the best riding sleds in history) have oil charged shocks with zero nitrogen pressure...The shock will stay at any position left with no movement in or out......This discussion is ridiculous.........Shocks in any torsion spring skid have nothing to do with initial ride height, and this discussion is only confusing the OP......
 

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On top of everything else already mentioned about how the shock does NOT hold the sled up on a torsion spring sled.....the angle of the shock and the lever action of the suspension arms also come into play.Even if you started out with 50 lbs of resistance in a vertical position by the time you add in the other factors there wouldn't be any resistance left.
 

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Wrong back at ya.......For example the TZ1 series of Cats(arguably some of the best riding sleds in history) have oil charged shocks with zero nitrogen pressure...The shock will stay at any position left with no movement in or out......This discussion is ridiculous.........Shocks in any torsion spring skid have nothing to do with initial ride height, and this discussion is only confusing the OP......
Then we agree.
 

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if the shock is a pressurized gas shock and takes a certain amount of force to colapse it ie; 50lbs and it is the rear shock.. then yes it will help in ride hight by @50lbs. if it is just a reg shock... oil dampened then full carrying force is on the springs. shocks are tuned to control calapse and rebound of springs attached or seperate. most likely the problem is you are not sitting flat on the floor or you have a dolly as mentioned under you skid/track, depending on where the dolly is situated... close to front will make it sag.... close to rear will sit higher. but i agree if its sitting flat on floor... then you either need to crank your cams on the rear soo when you sit on it with all gear on the dog leg should be half way between the torque link puck and start possition.
 

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if the shock is a pressurized gas shock and takes a certain amount of force to colapse it ie; 50lbs and it is the rear shock.. then yes it will help in ride hight by @50lbs. if it is just a reg shock... oil dampened then full carrying force is on the springs. shocks are tuned to control calapse and rebound of springs attached or seperate. most likely the problem is you are not sitting flat on the floor or you have a dolly as mentioned under you skid/track, depending on where the dolly is situated... close to front will make it sag.... close to rear will sit higher. but i agree if its sitting flat on floor... then you either need to crank your cams on the rear soo when you sit on it with all gear on the dog leg should be half way between the torque link puck and start possition.
I think you and drummer should talk to a chassis/shock builder or a mechanical engineer.
 

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The sled in question TRDon posted about was mine. It was on dollies at the time we were trying to figure this out.

We took it off the dollies and no problems whatsoever. Just wanted to share that info for those that were wondering/arguing. Thanks for all the input guys!
 
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