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Discussion Starter #1
<_< My 2002 ZR CC will not stop pushing through the turns. I have done some mild adjustment on the limiter strap and that is it. I just had the shocks revalved (warranteed thank god) and is much worse than it was before. It is especially bad when I get back into the throttle in the center and the exit of the corners. Should I jack down on the limiter strap some more? Should I put more preload on the front springs? Please help, it is scaring me, I ride to hard to push through the corners. Thank you fellow Cat People.
 

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go with new carbides 8 inche or more and tighten up on ur limiter straps a little (not completly tight when on level ground, noone on the machine)... i would keep ur preload at a moderate setting... with clickers i keep mine on 7 and it has little-no push wqith the STOCK skis and 144
 

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Tighten the Ltd. strap and add carbide.
For higher $$ go with Simmons or C&A's they are great for cornering.
Tim did you not get the remote adjuster? It was standard on the 02 CC's
 

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If you have a cross country, tightening the limiter straps has the same effect as turning in the knob on the handelbars. I usually turn the preload on the front skis about 3 full turns. This usually stops them from pushing in the corners, even with studs. :rolleyes:
 

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Tightening the straps just reduces front arm travel. Not what you want. What you really need to do is adjust ALL of the spring preloads to suit your weight and riding style.

Adding front runner (carbide) length is also a must especially if you have studs. 6 to 9" of cutting center carbide is about right. I personally like lots of runner so I can back off on ski spring preload, as I like a soft ride with precise steering.

To adjust the straps, let them all the way out until the front arm shock is fully extended then shorten them until the shock moves in about 1/2". This gives you max front arm travel. On a ZL with SS suspension you will have about 1 to 1 1/4" of thread showing at the strap adjuster... not sure about the ZR. Set the front arm spring to a minimum tension with the straps adjusted as above. You want just enough tension so the spring does not rattle or come loose at the adjust collar

Now set the rear springs per your riding style and preference... lets say position 2 on the preload block. Set the ski springs to allow a slight droop of the "A" arms with at least a half tank of gas.

Now check to see if the rider less sled "rocks" on the front portion of the skid when you bounce down on the rear bumper. If it does, reduce the front arm tension, add ski preload, add rear spring preload or shorten the straps a small amount IN THAT ORDER.

Ride the sled. If it turns on a dime at low speed (10 mph) or is really darty, then you have too much front arm tension for the skis and rear spring tensions. You can add rear and ski spring to offset the front arm if you are at minimum front arm tension.

The sled will be close at this point. Fine tune by adjusting the rear and the front but do the rear first so you are comfortable and then finalize the ski preload to get a good carve. Be aware that if you change the rear, you have to change the front also. Don’t be afraid to tweak those ski springs, as they are the key to responsive steering. Also be aware that this is also based on the coupling blocks being in place as they influence the overall spring rate of the skid as a whole.

BobCat
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Bobcat, I will try those things. I have always been a believer of not using the limiter strap too much. I think once I get the preload up front right and my carbides in order I should have better results. What do you think about removing the coupler blocks?? I have heard many different things...
 

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Removing the coupler blocks will make things worse when you power out of a corner. It will allow more weight transfer to the skid and unweight the skis. Push will increase.

BobCat
 

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I have the same sled and I had the same problem. I messed around with various settings and it still wouldn't turn. It's fun to go fast in a straight line, but not so practical ;). Anyway, when all else failed, I broke down and read the manual (duh). You should be able to correct the problem just by cranking down on the knob on the 'Clicker' shock on the fromt of the skid. It took about nine turns, on my sled. I also added pre-load to the ski shocks, but I'm a big guy (300#), so I'm not sure that you will need to do so. Good Luck!!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
As what I thought, the coupler block reduces or slows weight transfer from the front. I want to keep that especially with my pushing condition.
 

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make sure you check your center shock pre-load or your front skid frame shock as some people call it Robs set up for the f-cat works as a good place to start even on a zr good luck
 

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Slash, With it needing 9 turns on the adjuster to tighten up your sled I thing you'll find either the front skid shock spring is cranked up far too tight and or the front shock springs are set far too soft. The adjuster is intended to enhance a well set up sled not compensate for a poorly set up one and will fail prematurely when used as you are.

Rick.
 
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