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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Upon attempting to replace my hyfax I discovered that the bolt that holds the front shock to the skid-frame had not only come loose and egged the hole in the sliderail but broke into the next hole. Can this be repaired? Is there a "quick fix"? Do I need to buy new sliderails altogether? With the lack of funds and lack of snow I am REAL hesitant to pay the dealer the estimated $350 that they want to install new ones.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions you guys may have.
 

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I just had the rails on my 02 XC/SP welded up for the same reason. lower front shock mount - 4 holes.

Turned out perfect and cost $60.00 for the pair cdn.

I drilled them out on my press myself to save a few bucks . I just made a quick aluminum template based on the other mounting points, center punched them and a quick drill. Put on all new skid hardware and used red loctite on the lower mounts. (4 bolts on the XC)

Done by a shop that specialized in building race bikes.

When I pulled down my ZR Skid this season for service I also added a new shock bushing from SnoTek and all new nylock nuts for everything - also dabbed with loctite - blue.

You should not re-use nyloc fastners on the skid - replace every time you pull it down for service.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys.

Next question... Is it possible that the holes can be welded with the skid still installed in the sled or does it have to come out and be completely dis-assembled?
 

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Thanks guys.

Next question... Is it possible that the holes can be welded whith the skid still installed in the sled or does it have to come out and be completely dis-assembled?[/b]
The guys who did mine asked for the bare rails only.

I wouldn't do it in the sled but my nature is always to take the long way. I'm pretty fussy so I can often go to far with things like this so my advice is likely of no benefit.

Easier to drill with a press to insure the holes are perfect also.

It took me about 2 hours to remove my skid and completely strip it down to rails from opening the first beer to putting away the bottles so I could go over and detail mine.

Back together should take an evening as you'll want to carefully drill the holes, clean the shafts, bushings and touch up paint chips and go over all the bearings while she is apart.

May not hurt to do the skid shocks while she is out if you can swing it. Mine were under $60 a pop.

Don't forget to get that shock bushing ordered up from Bill at SnoTek, $10.00 and a far cry from a new shock because once it is banged oval your pretty much screwed. You'll have it apart anyways and if you look I'd suspect your lower shock bushing is a bit banged up or gone.

Just my thoughts.

Anyone have any tips on doing it in the sled?
 

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Couldn't these be installed with the skid still in the sled??? http://www.fettbrosperformance.com/www/fet...oductCode=ACRR2[/b]
Sure could.
Best way to prevent it from happening again is to......................
-always keep a close eye on all the skid bolts
-use the earlier Sno Pro lower front shock mount. The winged brackets give huge additional support to the rails and the thicker style bushing never seems to wear out. My set up is now in it's third sled with zero issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think that my dealer is feeling the pinch of a no snow winter and wants to pinch me for $350 to put in new slide rails...

I have seen the repair kits online though from Fett Bros. and another one from Blizzard Products. Looks like I may go this route. I can't see welding and redrilling the holes if it is likely to happen again.
 

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I cut an old A. D Bovin aluminum coupler mounting part in half and drilled them to match the holes that are on either side of the original egged out hole, and used two bolts, one in front and one in back of the ( original egged out hole)bolt that goes all the way thru and supports the Shock. I cut down the outer spring retainer bushing to compensate for the thick aluminum it added worked for over three thousand miles.
 

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i had the same problem but with the rear spring mount bolt on a sno pro. I used a piece of 1/8 steel plate and drilled 3 holes in it and used the holes ahead and behind to bolt the steel to the rail, then i put the long bolt through and it worked perfect. I had my rails replaced under warranty but i put the plates on the new ones to prevent it from happening again. Pics to follow
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
pics please?
 

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This is an age-old problem! There is a very simple problem to fix this from ever happening again the only catch is you have to start out with good rails and aluminum spacers. I contacted Joey Hallstrom from Cat in 2001 about this problem with the skids. Sent him pictures and everything but apparently they never wanted to address the issue. If you caught it in time, warranty did pay for new rails.

The outside of the wheel on each side of the front shock axial is compressed with an aluminum spacer. One side of the aluminum spacer is compressed up against the plastic wheel using a steel washer the other side of the aluminum spacer is against the aluminum rail. The problem is the aluminum spacer compressed against the aluminum rail! The wheel inserts and rail spacer area contracts and expands with temperature. When it does the aluminum spacer loosens slightly and will spin wearing off some of the soft aluminum spacer and into the soft aluminum rail. You cannot have two soft surfaces together. Once this starts you are doomed. The fixed length steel rod that goes through the wheels is just that fixed. You can tighten the wheel bolt till hell freezes over and that spacers on either side are still going to spin.

You can reach into that front shock wheel on each side and grab the aluminum spacer. If you can turn it with your thumb and finger it is time to address the issue. Tightening the bolts will not do any good. Good news is there is a cheap permanent fix. The bad news is you have to take the skid out and take it all apart separating the front arm wheel axial from both sides of the rail.

The fix is to take two “thin” steel Grade 5 washers just like the thicker ones that the aluminum spacers already compress on the wheel side and put the new thin one between the aluminum spacer and the rail. You will have to grind a little flat spot on each washer to fit it under the front arm-mounting bracket, as the area is real close. Again put each washer on the outside edge of the new aluminum spacers between the spacer and the rail surface. Tighten the rails together making sure that inner fixed rod compresses through the inside of each washer and butts up against the rail when tight.

The end result is that aluminum spacer now meets steel at both ends, one up against the wheel and now one up against the rail. No more wear will take place! I have 10,000 miles on this skid without even having to tighten that bolt again. A 2-cent fix for an age-old problem….Hope this helps! :div20:
 

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i cut a piece of 1/4" aluminum to fit the outside of the rail, drilled 3 new holes, and used longer bolts. never took the skid out, and have had no problems so far. and if that eggs out, i'll just do the same thing again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks guys for all of your responses here. After considering all of my options I have purchased a rail repair kit from Blizzard Products. John was very helpful and seemd quite educated in the pitfalls of the 900. Will be installing it this weekend and hopefully we receive some white stuff soon to try it out.

Thanks again! :chug:
 
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