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Old 10-11-2019, 08:43 PM   #1 (permalink)
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I'm in the process of replacing the deck on my sled bed v front trailer. I've done some searching but saw mixed reviews about what type of plywood to use. Any help/info is appreciated.
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Old 10-11-2019, 10:49 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Marine grade ply
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Old 10-12-2019, 10:33 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Marine grade ply
2nd this. For a bunch or reasons including strength, rot resistance and and exterior grade glue.
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Old 10-12-2019, 10:56 AM   #4 (permalink)
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yes marine grade, or if just treated plywood, make sure its rated for round contact, its treated better, than the lesser NON ground contact treated wood!
and make sure you use chemical resistant hardware to secure it down
treated wood chemicals will eat certain metals!
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Old 10-12-2019, 03:24 PM   #5 (permalink)
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I just used exterior grade plywood and painted the topside.



By the time the wood rots out, etc. You can replace it again for less than you will buying marine.
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Old 10-13-2019, 12:11 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Thanks for the replies so far, I've heard that marine is the best but was looking for other opinions. I've also heard not to use regular treated on aluminum as it will cause corrosion?
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Old 10-13-2019, 12:50 PM   #7 (permalink)
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I have used regular treated ply wood on my trailers in the past, never had any reaction from it and the aluminum frame< its on there a good 15+ yrs now too
BUT when you mix METALS with aluminum, you will get a reaction, and this is why they place sacrificial things between trailers frames and the axle mounts! to try and curb the reactions from the different metals !

treated wood will eat steel hardware, screws and bolts over time'
and why you need to use either aluminum or stainless steel, or other wise Coated screws rivets/bolts when using in treated wood!
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Old 10-13-2019, 04:53 PM   #8 (permalink)
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I tried to post this but failed. If it comes up twice, my apologies.

The copper in treated wood causes the reaction; it does discolour and corrode Aluminum. This impacts fasteners more extensively and quickly b/c it's surrounded and embedded in the wood and I've seen flashing chewed up in relatively short order. It could be that treated wood laying on a much thicker gauge box tube frame would be a slower reaction but I still wouldn't personally do it without putting something b/w the two (e.g. thin rubber sheet).

IMO marine ply is still the best option followed by a good quality sheet of exterior ply that you've gone over to make sure it's the best of that batch (avoid sheets with lots of voids b/w plies, de-lamination of plies, large knots holes, etc.). It's most important to make sure the adhesive in the ply is meant for exterior otherwise moisture will simply cause it to fall apart.

Of course use and abuse matters. Is this sitting outside flat all the time with water pooling on it? or will you keep it covered and/or tilted to have the water run off? Is it in the sun or shade? In the city or country? At our cabin on the lake, things decompose a lot faster then they do at my primary residence near the city.
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Old 10-13-2019, 05:05 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishhard View Post
I tried to post this but failed. If it comes up twice, my apologies.

The copper in treated wood causes the reaction; it does discolour and corrode Aluminum. This impacts fasteners more extensively and quickly b/c it's surrounded and embedded in the wood and I've seen flashing chewed up in relatively short order. It could be that treated wood laying on a much thicker gauge box tube frame would be a slower reaction but I still wouldn't personally do it without putting something b/w the two (e.g. thin rubber sheet).

IMO marine ply is still the best option followed by a good quality sheet of exterior ply that you've gone over to make sure it's the best of that batch (avoid sheets with lots of voids b/w plies, de-lamination of plies, large knots holes, etc.). It's most important to make sure the adhesive in the ply is meant for exterior otherwise moisture will simply cause it to fall apart.

Of course use and abuse matters. Is this sitting outside flat all the time with water pooling on it? or will you keep it covered and/or tilted to have the water run off? Is it in the sun or shade? In the city or country? At our cabin on the lake, things decompose a lot faster then they do at my primary residence near the city.

Yes that's what I read as well on the green treat, my trailer has a channel that the ply goes in so a layer between would be almost impossible. My trailer does sit outside all the time as I dont have room for it inside.
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Old 10-13-2019, 05:51 PM   #10 (permalink)
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if your worried about a reaction of your frame from the wood
why not just spray paint things, a few coats will add a layer to help slow things down

, maybe even some under coating, let it dry good before installing the wood onto the grove

you can also place duck tape or likes on the plywood

I know yrs back lots of folks would use roof tar to seal treated posts they sunk into the ground to help make them last longer from rotting!


I would SKIP basic NON Treated plywood, if your sleds have studs and or you don';t use ski guides, , as there will be a ton of places water will seep in faster and make it rot off even faster
the hassle of replacing decking is more work than I'd want to do ona regular basis

if you use treated wood, you can always treat it with good waterproofing now and then to help it last even longer!

Many people I know treat the bottom of things heavy, before installing, as its harder to coat again later on!


to help wood last longer on tilt trailer, or any flat bed
if you raise the tongue jack to keep deck at , as steep an angle as you can, it will shed water faster, prevent ponding, and thus, last longer!
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