Driveline Maintenance Tools and Techniques - Page 2 - HCS Snowmobile Forums

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Old 11-23-2016, 12:33 PM   #11 (permalink)
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The new seals on mine were a PITA to install for some reason. Didn't want to tap in. Tight fit.
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Old 11-28-2016, 03:51 PM   #12 (permalink)
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I started ripping apart my sled to perform the upgrades and replacements. Here's a few hints and pain points:



Get a decent pair of snap ring pliers. I believe there's 1 on the bottom of the chaincase, 2 to 3 at the top of the chaincase, 1 on the outside of the driven clutch side jackshaft bearing, and one on the outside of the driveshaft clutch side bearing. The snap rings don't have holes, so you'll need a snap ring plier that has kind of a flat end. The least fun snap ring is on the chaincase side of the jackshaft, since you have to remove that snapring twice as if falls into another snap ring groove on the way off the shaft.



The jackshaft comes out on the driven clutch side. Since I was doing the update on a 2012 I didn't need to remove the bearing from the big aluminum bracket that is bolted to the motor. However, I would imagine that you have to remove the aluminum brakcet anyway to get the jackshaft out since the bearing is pressed onto the shaft and into the aluminum brakcet. The motor and the brakcet all have rubber mounts, so I imagine you'd never get enough impulse force onto anything to get the bearing or shaft to move.



Sneaking out the big aluminum bracket that holds the driven clutch side jackshaft bearing is a pain in the ass for several reasons:



-There is a thru bolt in the middle on the bracket that is a complete pain in the ass to get to on a turbo. To remove horizontal chassis support bar that is blocking the aluminum bracket's exit path we loosened the vertical support bar that goes up towards the handle bars to get better access. The brake line and and the main electrical harness are attached to that vertical support brace, so we only loosened it instead of removing it.



-The motor needs to be moved probably 2 inches to get the aluminum bearing support to clear the tab on the tunnel that it is thru-bolted to. It needs to be moved more forwards rather than upwards, and a crow bar between the metal tab that frames the heat exchanger and the engine did the trick. I would only put the crowbar against the metal tab of the heat exchanger frame, since any further towards the center of the front tunnel is the heat exchanger itself (there's nothing between the actual heat exchanger and the back of the motor).



Once the aluminum motor mount was moved up and around the metal tab on the heat exchanger frame a few taps on the jackshaft from the chaincase side was all that it took to get it completely out. My driven clutch side jackshaft bearing was in decent shape it seems, although the chaincase side was rough. I haven't pressed that bearing out of the chaincase yet.



Another hint: In the update kit the aluminum mount that holds the bearing is already installed onto the jackshaft. Be careful removing the jackshaft from the box because the bearing allows the shaft to go through at an angle. Without anything to keep the angle that the shaft goes through the bearing from becoming too large the jackshaft will pop out the bearing's seal. This is why they mention putting a 6.5" deep wall socket over the jackshaft, since this will prevent the jackshaft from ending up with too high an angle from perpendicular in the bearing and popping out the seal.
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Last edited by izzni; 11-28-2016 at 03:56 PM.
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Old 11-28-2016, 08:58 PM   #13 (permalink)
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I would like to point out, for those of you removing just the bearing, it is possible to get the right size tube (whatever material you want with one end capped to put the bolt through) and "pull" the jackshaft (and bearing) in the aluminum bracket out on the clutch side using the threads in the jackshaft. You will need a range of threaded bolts or some washers/spacers.

Just an alternative to pulling that bracket out, which was well described above. Major PITA!

Last edited by 20H1GHC0UNTRY13; 11-28-2016 at 09:02 PM.
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Old 11-29-2016, 10:48 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20H1GHC0UNTRY13 View Post
I would like to point out, for those of you removing just the bearing, it is possible to get the right size tube (whatever material you want with one end capped to put the bolt through) and "pull" the jackshaft (and bearing) in the aluminum bracket out on the clutch side using the threads in the jackshaft. You will need a range of threaded bolts or some washers/spacers.

Just an alternative to pulling that bracket out, which was well described above. Major PITA!
Interesting idea. How do you press the new bearing back in applying force only to the outer race?
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Old 11-29-2016, 06:21 PM   #15 (permalink)
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watch the OSP video - they make it look easy with that bearing driver tool they use
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Old 05-15-2019, 01:41 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Default Industrial bearing nut

Quote:
Originally Posted by Super 8 View Post
I made my own and would be more than happy to send it to you to use.
Looks like an Industrial Nut to me.. I purchased one twice that size to work on a truck differential ..

I found an Industrial supplier with a reasonable price. .. I can't even remember the brand now or what they call them.
Mine is a BASF-10 but seems like there is a 16 on the Nut ..

https://www.whittet-higgins.com/part.php?series_id=76
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